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SurferJoe46
01-05-2012, 03:29 PM
I find this very shocking - sad really.

I live in such affluence - multiple vehicles, a boat, lots of bass guitars and amplifiers and solid walls around me and a floor and non-leaking roof.

When I was in Hong Kong, I never saw this, and I think this might be from the Olympics that screwed a lot of the outland farmers up when they gave it all up and moved to the city to earn their 'fortunes' there.

Now -- I KNOW this isn't a recent article, but I just found it and I'm still shocked - a lot.


Cage dogs of Hong Kong: The tragedy of tens of thousands living in 6ft by 2ft rabbit hutches - in a city with more Louis Vuitton shops than Paris

By Damien Gayle
UPDATED: 10:16 EST, 11 January 2012

Hong Kong, one of the world's richest cities, is abuzz with a luxury property boom that has seen homes exchanged for record sums.

But the wealth of the city has a darker side, with tens of thousands priced out of housing altogether and forced to live in the most degrading conditions.

These pictures by British photographer Brian Cassey capture the misery of people - some estimates put the figure as high as 100,000 - who are forced to live in cages measuring just 6ft by 2 1/2ft.

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/01/11/article-2084971-0F6811F700000578-728_634x481.jpg

Yan Chi Leung is mentally ill and lives in the 6ft by 2.5ft wire cage at the bottom of this stack of three

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/01/11/article-2084971-0F68120700000578-597_634x421.jpg

Kong Sui Kao, 64, sits in his home in a room with 19 other cages

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/01/11/article-2084971-0F68120300000578-201_634x421.jpg

The city is one of the planet's most densely packed metropolitan areas, with nearly 16,500 people living in every square mile of the territory.

Unscrupulous landlords are charging around US$200 a month for each cage, which are packed 20 to a room, and up to three levels high.

The lower cages are more expensive because you can almost stand inside them, but the conditions are no less squalid. All this in a city with more Louis Vuitton shops than Paris.

Tai Lun Po, 79, has lived in cage he is sitting in for 30 years

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/01/11/article-2084971-0F68124B00000578-419_634x421.jpg

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/01/11/article-2084971-0F6811FF00000578-951_634x421.jpg

Eight-year-old Lee Ka Ying lives in a 6 foot square 'cubicle cage home' with her mother

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/01/11/article-2084971-0F68125700000578-17_634x421.jpg

There are other photos on the site.

Occupants must share toilets and washing facilities, which are rudimentary. Many of the apartments have no kitchens, forcing their impoverished residents to spend there meagre (sic) incomes on takeaway food.

The cage homes have been a running scandal in Hong Kong's housing market for decades, yet rather than disappear, they are on the rise.

As the world economic crisis has lashed the city a former British territory whose economy is focused on financial services, more have been forced to turn to them for a place to stay.

The alternative is life on the streets. 'The temperature inside the cages can be two to three degrees higher than what they are outside,' he said. 'It's really uncomfortable, and sometimes I cannot sleep until after 5 in the morning.'

Cockroaches, wall lizards, lice and rats are common. 'Sometimes I am worried if lizards or cockroaches will crawl into my ears at night,' said Cheung.

LINK::: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2084971/Hong-Kongs-cage-homes-Tens-thousands-living-6ft-2ft-rabbit-hutches.html

Gobe1
01-05-2012, 03:48 PM
For 200 bucks a month i would take my chances outside, less rats and cockroaches too

Looks to me like their cages are their bedrooms

"forcing their impoverished residents to spend there meagre (sic) incomes on takeaway food." do they have social welfare in hong kong?

lakewoodlady
01-05-2012, 04:21 PM
That is terribly sad :(

LL

kenj
01-05-2012, 05:35 PM
SWMBO and I were in Bali about 3 weeks ago and saw the poverty there. Women at Port Benoa thrusting handcrafts through the security fence begging us to buy. We didn't but were bought to earth with a crash when our friend bought a small cloth object and the Balinese woman burst into tears having made a sale. Pity some of our brethren who cry that a large number of Kiwis who are recieving benefits, are on the poverty line and have starving chidren, should go and see what poverty really is!

Ken

WalOne
01-05-2012, 06:46 PM
SWMBO and I were in Bali about 3 weeks ago and saw the poverty there. Women at Port Benoa thrusting handcrafts through the security fence begging us to buy. We didn't but were bought to earth with a crash when our friend bought a small cloth object and the Balinese woman burst into tears having made a sale. Pity some of our brethren who cry that a large number of Kiwis who are recieving benefits, are on the poverty line and have starving chidren, should go and see what poverty really is!


I regularly passed through Hong Kong a few years back, and our local manager (Lewis) insisted I stay with he and his family of four. I was embarrassed because I anticipated much more than Lewis' home ... five people living in a one bedroom flat. The family all moved out of their one bedroom for the night, and I had the luxury of staying in it. They deposited themselves around the rest of the flat - wherever there was space, and would not hear a word of my protests. We paid Lewis a small fortune by HKG standards, and they considered themselves rich and fortunate to be able to live in a western style apartment with mod cons of aircon and western luxuries.

That was in the days of turning right once you saw the red and white Checkerboard on the approach to Kai Tak, but from Joe's post, that doesn't surprise me.

Metla
01-05-2012, 07:09 PM
Surely bunks would be more effective then cages, You could get far more people per room.

Hostels are nothing new, NZ has communal accommodation with shared bedrooms.

Greven
01-05-2012, 07:35 PM
Bunks would be a lot more expensive than cages & I don't see how you could fit in more bunks than cages

Metla
01-05-2012, 07:43 PM
Bunks would be a lot more expensive than cages & I don't see how you could fit in more bunks than cages

I can guarantee you not only could I source bunks for cheaper then the cost of steel cages but I could fit more of in a room, thereby increasing the daily turnover.

win-win situation.

WalOne
01-05-2012, 08:05 PM
Part of the problem:

HERE (http://www.imagef1.net.nz/upload/rickshaw2.jpg)

:o

Metla
01-05-2012, 08:17 PM
Deriving an income from tourists is part of the problem?

In what way?

Surely its better then no income at all.