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kenj
11-02-2012, 10:02 AM
Oh yea!!!!!!

http://news.cnet.com/8301-17852_3-57374683-71/teen-whines-about-parents-on-facebook-dad-shoots-laptop/?part=rss&subj=latest-news&tag=title

Ken :D

SP8's
11-02-2012, 10:44 AM
:lol:

rob_on_guitar
11-02-2012, 11:38 AM
I watched this this morning and was more satisfied with the shooting than the idea of giving it away to charity

mikebartnz
11-02-2012, 11:54 AM
:lol::lol:
One thing that gets me with YT is all the posts flagged as spam which isn't. Must be people reporting it as spam instead of giving the thumbs down.

Paul.Cov
11-02-2012, 03:51 PM
My take on it: Redneck control-freak dad spits the dummy and destroys a bunch of his own hard work.

The daughter may not be perfect. The dad needs to take just as hard a look at himself.

No way to garner respect by humiliating your kid.

Family discipline should be kept within the family, not broadcast to the world.

Dad fails!

mikebartnz
11-02-2012, 09:32 PM
No way to garner respect by humiliating your kid.
The trouble with too many parents today is that they try to be their kids friend rather than a parent.

tuiruru
12-02-2012, 12:52 PM
The trouble with too many parents today is that they try to be their kids friend rather than a parent.
I heard somebody fairly high up in the NZ Police say exactly that last week. Trouble is, given how young some people get pregnant these days, we've had at least two generations of parents doing that and are now suffering the consequences. It's always harder to recover from mistakes as opposed to not making them in the fist place!!

(Coincidentally, I came here to post the same clip, and have just sent out a FB Post and general e-mail to social contacts with the following message:
I made a conscious decision in my mid teens that I didn’t want kids. The reasons for that are complex, but, and this is a big generalization, I tend to hear people moaning about the problems they have with their offspring, rather than the positives. If you kind of fall into that category (definitely no criticism intended), this is for you. If you’re a grandparent, maybe pass it on to your children. Whatever your stance it highlights the complications that modern technology can bring to an already volatile mix. You’ll need an internet connection that’s better than mine (not difficult). (For those watching their datacap it involves about 38 mb). I don’t think it matters if this was staged or not, it’ll press buttons. Teenagers beware!! Final comment: I would have used a shotgun, but then I haven’t got that problem have I ? ;)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kl1ujzRidmU))

gary67
12-02-2012, 02:36 PM
It's a pity society doesn't have the balls to stand up to their kids anymore and teach them to respect their elders and be thankful for what they have got. My parents gave us very little because they simply couldn't afford to give us more, it made them ashamed to be poor and the 3 kids all had after school jobs so we could buy the things we wanted. I certainly respect my parents for doing the best they could

Billy T
12-02-2012, 10:10 PM
If there is one crucial lesson in life that is lacking for young people today, and in the not so distant past as well, it is consequences.

Without consequences, there can be neither balance in life, nor demarcation between success and failure.

Our kids have been very good, and are both successful, but that doesn't mean that there have not been disputes over parenting or complaints of unfairness etc.

There was one thing they could always rely upon, if they did as their parents expected of them, there were consequences they would like.

If they failed to do what they should have expected of themselves, then the consequences were their own responsibility.

No bail outs...........

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

Contented
13-02-2012, 01:06 PM
My attitude is much the same, my kids are both young so it's adjusted to what they can understand and are able to reasonably adher to, but the philosophy remains.
They have a good and balanced life, they know broadly what is good and what is not and the 'rules' are clear, appropriate, constant and enforced. I'm personally against smacking, but that's not to say there are no consequences to their actions. I keep to my end of the deal and provide them a safe, loving environment with all the opportunities they could ask for, they keep to their end by sticking to the rules.

Their decisions have consequences, good and bad. There's not many rules, just the common sense ones, ones they can only really break on purpose. By being consistent it's easier, however far along the scale from soft and wooly to draconian one may be. The odd spontaneous poor judgement aside, they have the ability to weigh up and decide whether to do something 'good' or 'bad' and are given the opportunity to choose, likely outcomes together with 'why' can be clarified with their Mum and me if needed.
Parenting is all about preparing them for the real world and clear boundaries are found in society as well as the workplace.

Without judging whether the fella with the gun should have threatened to shoot her laptop in the first place, he made his rules clear and his Daughter elected to ignore them so following through was, I think, the right thing to do.
I'd show it to my kids but they're young enough that the Boy would want to re-enact it with a stick and a muddy puddle, and my Girl would be more interested in why the man would wear a hat that was neither Pink nor Purple.

Agent_24
13-02-2012, 01:28 PM
My take on it: Redneck control-freak dad spits the dummy and destroys a bunch of his own hard work.

x2

Billy T
13-02-2012, 09:44 PM
I don't see it as spitting the dummy, I see it simply as a parent drawing a line in the sand. I don't necessarily agree with his methods, simply selling the laptop might have worked just as well and not offered the opportunity for righteous indignation, but hell, it's the wild west and guns are everywhere, so when in Rome........ We had to draw just such a line once with one of our kids (call it bluff and counter-bluff if you like) but the lesson was learned and when later viewed in retrospect by all parties, it was an effective response.

About 35 years ago (in my mid-twenties) I had to deal with a knotty issue with my own parents over my then choice of girlfriend, and I had to stand up for my right to choose my own companion so I made my point, drew a line in the sand and stayed behind it. They came around in the end, but I'd hate to have heard their discussions on the issue, my Dad liked her, my mother didn't!

The key is to recognise when enough is enough and take a positive action that captures the other party's attention. Perforating the iPad was an effective mechanism that allowed her father to let off steam while at the same time depriving her of a privilege that she clearly did not value.

In the fullness of time they'll hug and make up, but I wouldn't be holding my breath waiting for a replacement iPad.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

B.M.
14-02-2012, 02:07 AM
I can relate to that video clip because many years ago my late father told me that if I ever brought a motorbike home he’d put an axe through it. What a preposterous proposition, cutting up a motorbike with an axe. But my father was a man of his word so I cunningly bought a motorbike but kept it at a neighbours place four doors down the road.

All was fine and I guess from time to time I was seen roaring past until one day I needed an urgent toilet stop so I roared in home, parked my bike against the shed, and headed for the dunny. Whilst sitting on the throne with pants around my ankles I hear this commotion outside. So taking a peek out the toilet window to my horror I find father with his axe demolishing my motorbike.

By the time I’d hitched my britches and got outside it was far too late to do anything and the old bugger didn’t even blunt his axe, he used the back of it.

So you see that type of parenting isn’t all that new. :lol:

mikebartnz
14-02-2012, 08:05 PM
I can relate to that video clip because many years ago my late father told me that if I ever brought a motorbike home he’d put an axe through it. What a preposterous proposition, cutting up a motorbike with an axe. But my father was a man of his word so I cunningly bought a motorbike but kept it at a neighbours place four doors down the road.

All was fine and I guess from time to time I was seen roaring past until one day I needed an urgent toilet stop so I roared in home, parked my bike against the shed, and headed for the dunny. Whilst sitting on the throne with pants around my ankles I hear this commotion outside. So taking a peek out the toilet window to my horror I find father with his axe demolishing my motorbike.

By the time I’d hitched my britches and got outside it was far too late to do anything and the old bugger didn’t even blunt his axe, he used the back of it.

So you see that type of parenting isn’t all that new. :lol:
Have you ever been caught short since then.:D

B.M.
16-02-2012, 09:09 AM
Have you ever been caught short since then.:D

Well never with such consequences Mike. :D

I do know however that if I’d been brought up under all the PC Bull...t that we have today, I’d have spent most of my life in Jail.

So I have to be grateful for a father with iron fists, (yes I had a go at him about 3 or 4 times and always walked into a “lip buttoner” and wound up on by backside) a couple of Teachers that could wield a Cane, and a local Bobbie with size 12 boots.

And for those that like a happy ending, my father and I wound up the best of mates, and the Teachers and local Bobbie, just friends. :D