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WalOne
04-02-2012, 09:36 AM
HERE (http://www.ziln.co.nz/video/969)

Questionable if they're strictly VFR at times

Takes me back to V100 circuit training more years ago than I care to admit to :)

prefect
04-02-2012, 12:44 PM
See the turbulence? must be hard trying to formate on a day like that.

tut
04-02-2012, 02:39 PM
Where did you fly the V100?

HERE (http://www.ziln.co.nz/video/969)

Questionable if they're strictly VFR at times

Takes me back to V100 circuit training more years ago than I care to admit to :)

WalOne
04-02-2012, 03:20 PM
Where did you fly the V100?

Mid 60's - WN (Wellington Aero Club). Did my PPL check there in a 30knot NW coming from straight over the top of Mt Vic. But that's what the locals train in :groan:

CAA Testing officer reckoned he couldn't have done a better landing himself. I remember that well, because nobody's ever said the same to me since :lol:

Trev
04-02-2012, 03:26 PM
Good video. Thanks.
:)

tut
04-02-2012, 04:54 PM
I was with the Waikato Aero club. We had the first 100 off the line, CDQ if I remember right.
Only got airborne on a hot day because the earth was curved.
I flew the whole series up to the 300hp Airtrainer. I think the airforce ones were the 210hp models and having done a lot of time in those I used to be very impressed at the performances they put on at airshows. Of course the Airtrainer was a different design based on the one and only 4 seat Victa in the country.
I never knew whether to log them as a Victa or an Airtourer and they went from 100,115,130 to 150 hp, the 130 being the nicest for aerobatics.


QUOTE=WalOne;1074466]Mid 60's - WN (Wellington Aero Club). Did my PPL check there in a 30knot NW coming from straight over the top of Mt Vic. But that's what the locals train in :groan:

CAA Testing officer reckoned he couldn't have done a better landing himself. I remember that well, because nobody's ever said the same to me since :lol:[/QUOTE]

WalOne
04-02-2012, 06:11 PM
I was with the Waikato Aero club. We had the first 100 off the line, CDQ if I remember right.
Only got airborne on a hot day because the earth was curved.


I know what you 're saying. I hardly flew the V100 after my PPL and graduating to the C172 - cross country flying was always my bag. Reckon I must have the record - or a record - for the longest bone jarring PPL solo cross country in a V100: WN/OH/NP (b/l OH - ahem), NP-AR-WP (b/l WP - ahem), WP-WR-AR-HN-PM-MS-WN. I remember meeting Jim Fenwick at HN, who gave me some fail-safe advice which was never wrong: if on reaching 1000ft you can see the table mountain south of Taumarunui, you'll get through the middle OK. Never forgot that.

:D

lakewoodlady
04-02-2012, 06:45 PM
Went for Brevet Club scholarship in 1965 Cessna something, can't remember, in New Plymouth. Didn't win it, was the only female student. Still took lessons until 1966, never went solo. Lots of fun though!

LL

lakewoodlady
04-02-2012, 06:55 PM
Awesome! Thanks WalOne!

LL

tut
04-02-2012, 07:03 PM
I know what you 're saying. I hardly flew the V100 after my PPL and graduating to the C172 - cross country flying was always my bag. Reckon I must have the record - or a record - for the longest bone jarring PPL solo cross country in a V100: WN/OH/NP (b/l OH - ahem), NP-AR-WP (b/l WP - ahem), WP-WR-AR-HN-PM-MS-WN. I remember meeting Jim Fenwick at HN, who gave me some fail-safe advice which was never wrong: if on reaching 1000ft you can see the table mountain south of Taumarunui, you'll get through the middle OK. Never forgot that.

:D

In a V100 that is a cross country of epic proportion. Good on you.
The mountain you mention is just north of the TM airfield and as Fenwick said a good indication if whether you could get to WU direct.
Cliff Tate did the round the world flight in a 115 which never got the recognition it should have.
With the central control stick they were good for cross country as you could put the map on your knee without obstructing the controls and the visibility was also pretty good with those short wings.

WalOne
04-02-2012, 08:22 PM
Went for Brevet Club scholarship in 1965 Cessna something, can't remember, in New Plymouth. Didn't win it, was the only female student. Still took lessons until 1966, never went solo. Lots of fun though!

LL

Well done for trying. You must have been flying from the old Bell Block field. On my epic solo cross country, I remember flying over Stratford in rain under low cloud at about 150 feet and following the railway line into Bell Block ...

prefect
04-02-2012, 09:09 PM
I know what you 're saying. I hardly flew the V100 after my PPL and graduating to the C172 - cross country flying was always my bag. Reckon I must have the record - or a record - for the longest bone jarring PPL solo cross country in a V100: WN/OH/NP (b/l OH - ahem), NP-AR-WP (b/l WP - ahem), WP-WR-AR-HN-PM-MS-WN. I remember meeting Jim Fenwick at HN, who gave me some fail-safe advice which was never wrong: if on reaching 1000ft you can see the table mountain south of Taumarunui, you'll get through the middle OK. Never forgot that.

:D

Jim Fenwick he sure was experienced guess he would be too old to fly now. I learnt to fly at Te Kowhai never met him but I have his book which I used to study for the ppl subjects.

tut
04-02-2012, 09:23 PM
Jim Fenwick he sure was experienced guess he would be too old to fly now. I learnt to fly at Te Kowhai never met him but I have his book which I used to study for the ppl subjects.
Hi name was Ken. I worked for him for a couple of years. Died fairly recently. Both his sons entered flying and now their children are flying, one off carriers for the USAF.

When did you learn to fly at Te Kowhai. If you remember the owner of the airfield, Max Clear he passed away a couple of months ago too.

prefect
04-02-2012, 09:51 PM
Hi name was Ken. I worked for him for a couple of years. Died fairly recently. Both his sons entered flying and now their children are flying, one off carriers for the USAF.

When did you learn to fly at Te Kowhai. If you remember the owner of the airfield, Max Clear he passed away a couple of months ago too.

I went solo in 1996. My plane was kept in an old stable at Barry and Sallys used to taxi out and thru a gate onto the airfield if the wind was right slam the throttle open and commit some aviation. It was right on the approach so when I was working on it the other club members would give me the fingers over the side. I moved it up to Hobsonville and operated out of the glider club free hangarage in return for servicing the glider club TEA Fergi and the winch. Max of course built my microlight never forgot the call when he finished it and took it for its first test flight. Myself and Max once did a night flight in it with me holding an ex Kittyhawk landing lamp out the side.
Sure sad about Max he was a good bugger, really helped heaps of young kids get the flying bug many are now pilots all round the place.

The Error Guy
05-02-2012, 12:00 AM
I am a believer that rough weather makes flying fun, I have been up a few times for various reasons. One time I got an hours trial flight at kapiti. Deliberately used it when there was some epic turbulence coming off kapiti due to a southerly front. It was the most fun I'd had in ages, you'd struggle to take off getting bounced around in the turbulent air, make a right turn towards otaki getting punched up and down 500ft every few seconds and then turn across the hills. We got caught in a hurricane of a updraft near the hill, took us up a few 1000 ft in an extremely short space of time before we powered out and lost it all in the same way :D

Unfortunately he only let me have one shot at landing and it ended up being a go around.


Will be attempting to get into the aviation industry somehow this year, hopefully the Airforce will think i'm a star and accept me in (probably not, space is tighter than... a tight space :D ) If not RNZAF then i'll have to get a job and foot the $45,000 it takes to get your CPL+PPL these days and hope an airline takes me on. Tough industry nowadays.

I thoroughly believe I should have been born 1930-40, then I would have been able to enjoy life, fly crazy, enjoy all the mechanical and scientific goodies that were around back in the day and eventually be ready to drop off at ripe old age. Only bad thing i'd have to endure is the terrible age of design called 1990-2002 where people thought just because it was made on PC it was clever. It wasn't. It was hideous.


I can Honestly say I would give everything up to flick back a few decades. Then again, wouldn't we all?

lakewoodlady
05-02-2012, 09:18 AM
Well done for trying. You must have been flying from the old Bell Block field. On my epic solo cross country, I remember flying over Stratford in rain under low cloud at about 150 feet and following the railway line into Bell Block ...

Yes, Bell Block, a busy little airport in those days, all grass strips too. They had a very active Aero Club. I had to give up the flying, too expensive!

LL