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Lawrence
22-12-2011, 04:19 PM
Selling as new ,Hard Drives used with Movies and not as the described size

http://www.smh.com.au/digital-life/computers/exposed-new-dick-smith-hard-drive-full-of-pirated-movies-20111222-1p6eh.html

But it would not happen here I guess

Bobh
22-12-2011, 05:55 PM
Oh dear, how embarrassing for Dick Smith getting caught out like this. It could not have happened to a nicer business. They need to get their operating procedures sorted out. :D

icow
22-12-2011, 06:11 PM
Yeah we got an mp4 player from them, broke and got it repaired. They sent us someone else's back. Still had their stuff on it.

The Error Guy
22-12-2011, 07:01 PM
It probably is a 1.5 TB but there is only a 30GB partition active. Especially as those Seagate enclosures are pretty much impossible to open cleanly I doubt someone switched in a 30GB SATA HHD in place, in fact I think they are sealed IE impossible to open without breaking. Can you even buy a 30GB SATA HDD?

Think of it this way mate, easier than downloading them, right? :devil

icow
22-12-2011, 07:09 PM
The retailer has since admitted that it sells second hand hard drives as new, but in this instance forgot to wipe it clean.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/digital-life/computers/exposed-new-dick-smith-hard-drive-full-of-pirated-movies-20111222-1p6eh.html#ixzz1hF1LjpMc


Mason said a Dick Smith staff member also separately told him that it had a regular practice of selling returned drives as new.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/digital-life/computers/exposed-new-dick-smith-hard-drive-full-of-pirated-movies-20111222-1p6eh.html#ixzz1hF1fjJMs
That's the bit that concerns me.

Lawrence
22-12-2011, 07:20 PM
Reading one of the comments may give a answer to the 30Gb capacity





The drive would have been 1.5TB - it just would have been reformatted as FAT32 in Windows which, for antiquated reasons, has a 30GB limit.

Chilling_Silence
22-12-2011, 10:13 PM
A few things came to mind from skimming over the article (Didn't read it thoroughly):
1) It wasn't "filled", it had like 10, that's like 6-8GB worth
2) FAT32 works fine on partitions over 30GB
3) It's possible a customer used it, returned it, and it was put back on the shelf or in one of those 'bargain bin' places. Wouldn't surprise me even...

pine-o-cleen
22-12-2011, 10:18 PM
You'd think they would be more careful considering this:


A NSW Fair Trading spokesman said retailers who mislead consumers about the nature of goods and services can face fines of up to $1.1 million for each offence, while consumers could claim compensation for consequential losses.

pcuser42
22-12-2011, 10:19 PM
2) FAT32 works fine on partitions over 30GB

True, but Windows XP and later can't format FAT32 partitions bigger than 32GB.

icow
23-12-2011, 12:56 AM
XP? That still exists?

The Error Guy
23-12-2011, 03:33 AM
It wasn't "filled", it had like 10, that's like 6-8GB worth

Yeah I was a bit confused about the filled part when I saw about 8 or 9 films... and that's it, in fact 8-9 films taking up around 9GB space on a 30GB HDD isn't even filled. On a TB scale thats like mildly tainted.

I also find it unlikely myself that this computer had several hours of video "corrupted" as a result of simply plugging the drive in due to malware. From my knowledge malware doesn't just find a few GB of information and just corrupt it. If it was going to do damage it would have done the lot or at least something else.

Another thing I noted was he claims the machine was never connected to the internet and has only ever had a video camera attached... if that's so why is there a 250GB HDD displayed in my computer? unless of course its a partitioned drive (50gb for windows and 250 for other stuff) But I find that unlikely myself.

Personally when it comes down to it there is a lack of adequate protection, if the footage was important malware protection should have been enabled, also why would he continue using the device on the computer if it had been suspected to cause damage previously? He should have made backups too although the drive was purchased as a backup so thats excusable.

IMO I think the whole corrupted and malware bit is all cock and bull. 30GB drive with pirated films, yes. Full of pirated films and malware no. Also there has been no PROOF that they films are pirated... probably are but not proven.

dugimodo
23-12-2011, 06:46 AM
It seems the guy in question isn't very computer literate and the article writer is probably no better. It doesn't excuse Dick smith for selling used hard drives as new and potentially with malware or Virus's though.
It is more likely to be a virus and could have done what he claims, it makes sense that a virus contained in a video file would infect other video files. I'd almost put money on the fact he watched one or more of the movies to get infected though.

A smart user would have repartitioned and formatted the drive and would have antivirus software running wether or not they ever use the internet.
Any professional taking video footage and not keeping a secure backup needs something like this to happen to educate them to the foolishness of the practice. Home users also should backup anything important.

It's difficult to figure out who's to blame for what here. The retailer replaced the drive and was publicly embarrassed and definately was in the wrong here, but is it their fault the user lost the only copy of his files? and what about the person who returned the drive with the dodgy movies on it. How much at fault are they?

Myth
23-12-2011, 07:11 AM
Yeah I was a bit confused about the filled part when I saw about 8 or 9 films... and that's it, in fact 8-9 films taking up around 9GB space on a 30GB HDD isn't even filled. On a TB scale thats like mildly tainted.

I also find it unlikely myself that this computer had several hours of video "corrupted" as a result of simply plugging the drive in due to malware. From my knowledge malware doesn't just find a few GB of information and just corrupt it. If it was going to do damage it would have done the lot or at least something else.

Another thing I noted was he claims the machine was never connected to the internet and has only ever had a video camera attached... if that's so why is there a 250GB HDD displayed in my computer? unless of course its a partitioned drive (50gb for windows and 250 for other stuff) But I find that unlikely myself.

Personally when it comes down to it there is a lack of adequate protection, if the footage was important malware protection should have been enabled, also why would he continue using the device on the computer if it had been suspected to cause damage previously? He should have made backups too although the drive was purchased as a backup so thats excusable.

IMO I think the whole corrupted and malware bit is all cock and bull. 30GB drive with pirated films, yes. Full of pirated films and malware no. Also there has been no PROOF that they films are pirated... probably are but not proven.This post made me laugh.

Are you a DSE employee?


Another thing I noted was he claims the machine was never connected to the internet and has only ever had a video camera attached... if that's so why is there a 250GB HDD displayed in my computer? unless of course its a partitioned drive (50gb for windows and 250 for other stuff) But I find that unlikely myself.Forgive my stupidity, but what does the size of his drive have to do with this? Any nub knows that video files can take up a lot of harddrive space. And if you had been watching the video that intently, you would see that there was indeed a smaller C:\


I also find it unlikely myself that this computer had several hours of video "corrupted" as a result of simply plugging the drive in due to malware. From my knowledge malware doesn't just find a few GB of information and just corrupt it. If it was going to do damage it would have done the lot or at least something else.Where was it mentioned that the drive never contained MORE than a few hours of footage? It may have corrupted all footage on that partition. He doesn't appear too IT savvy so he may indeed be freaking out and all it has done is screwed with his file associations.

Also, the Seagate possibly does contain malware - where did the movies get d/l from?

Dude... read the facts and stop speculating.


As for the OP... good ol Tricky Dicky really screwed up this time lol

Agent_24
23-12-2011, 09:35 AM
It seems the guy in question isn't very computer literate and the article writer is probably no better. It doesn't excuse Dick smith for selling used hard drives as new and potentially with malware or Virus's though.
It is more likely to be a virus and could have done what he claims, it makes sense that a virus contained in a video file would infect other video files. I'd almost put money on the fact he watched one or more of the movies to get infected though.

A smart user would have repartitioned and formatted the drive and would have antivirus software running wether or not they ever use the internet.
Any professional taking video footage and not keeping a secure backup needs something like this to happen to educate them to the foolishness of the practice. Home users also should backup anything important.

It's difficult to figure out who's to blame for what here. The retailer replaced the drive and was publicly embarrassed and definately was in the wrong here, but is it their fault the user lost the only copy of his files? and what about the person who returned the drive with the dodgy movies on it. How much at fault are they?


The user is a moron.


He had recycled camera memory cards while shooting so about six hours of his footage existed solely on the hard drive of the laptop

WHY would you do that? No backup? STUPID. Probably used Norton too, no wonder he got a virus.

He can give me the hard drive if he wants, free films, heh heh :D

The Error Guy
23-12-2011, 12:55 PM
This post made me laugh.

Are you a DSE employee?

No.



Forgive my stupidity, but what does the size of his drive have to do with this? Any nub knows that video files can take up a lot of harddrive space. And if you had been watching the video that intently, you would see that there was indeed a smaller C:\


Forgiven, I did mention that it is possible he partitioned however I was thinking (and speculating) that it was highly unlikely that he only ever had the video camera attached in the PC's life. The fact that video files take up lots of space is completely irrelevant.



Where was it mentioned that the drive never contained MORE than a few hours of footage? It may have corrupted all footage on that partition. He doesn't appear too IT savvy so he may indeed be freaking out and all it has done is screwed with his file associations.


It didn't but in my lifetime I have never heard of malware that damaged video files and only video files. Usually they tend to go for system files to bring down the computer or produce other devastating effects but then again, this is devastating for him if it is in true fact. As stated, this is my opinion from my experience and is not quoted as fact.




Also, the Seagate possibly does contain malware - where did the movies get d/l from?


I don't know where the movies were D/L from, for all we know they could have been ripped from the previous owners DVD collection although that is pretty darned unlikely. Just because they are pirated however does not mean they are infested with malware. Again, the fact the movies were pirated has little to no relevance to the fact that malware may/may not have existed. The malware could have been contracted from another computer the previous owner used etc.



Dude... read the facts and stop speculating.


Fact is, as others have said before, the guy comes across as pretty computer illiterate, therefore most of this article is mostly speculation in itself so far the only solid facts are: The HDD was 2nd hand and sold as new. The HDD contained another users (likely to be pirated) movies. Everything else is assumed.

To me the guy seems to be making stuff up (RE Malware), idk why but he just does.


As for the OP... good ol Tricky Dicky really screwed up this time lol

True dat though!!!

stu161204
23-12-2011, 02:11 PM
XP? That still exists?

Yes :)

Lawrence
23-12-2011, 08:01 PM
Seems like it is standard for the Retail Industry

http://www.smh.com.au/digital-life/computers/new-goods-scandal--more-stores-accused-20111223-1p80h.html

It must go on here as well

feersumendjinn
24-12-2011, 11:28 AM
From the comments on the above link

I went into a store and they sold me a home hi-fi and TV. The shop assistant just took them off the shelf and gave them to me without any packaging or manuals. They were obviously either return or ex-display. Needless to say that was the last time I shopped at Cash Converters.

Commenter
Peter
:stare::lol::lol:

mikebartnz
24-12-2011, 11:45 AM
From the comments on the above link
:stare::lol::lol:
Cash Converters.:( What the hell did the dickhead think.:groan:

pcuser42
24-12-2011, 12:10 PM
Cash Converters.:( What the hell did the dickhead think.:groan:

I think he was being somewhat sarcastic ;)