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Driftwood
21-11-2011, 06:53 PM
Puting a system together for a friend.
All used componants.

Asus P5K-E mobo
Intel E8500 cpu
HD 4870 gpu
Win7 x64 os

At bootup

"Unknown CPU is detected, updating BIOS is required to unleash its full power!
Press F1 to resume"

Went ahead & installed the os & installed latest drivers.

Still getting this prompt at bootup.

Have the latest Bios & update utility from Asus but system rejects it, claiming:

"The version of this file is not compatable with the version of windows you are running. Check your systems information to see whether you need an x86 etc etc"

Well, all the drivers came from Asus for Win7 x64.

So what am I doing wrong?

Speedy Gonzales
21-11-2011, 06:58 PM
Get the BIOS update (looks like its up to 1305 if its P5K-E), extract it to a USB flash drive. Then use EZ-Flash in the BIOS to update the BIOS. Wait for it to finish updating it, reconfigure / save the settings. If that message keeps appearing (and you cant update the BIOS), you'll have to install a lower spec CPU, flash it then put that E8500 CPU back in

Driftwood
21-11-2011, 08:35 PM
Thanks Speedy.
The EZ Flash update appears to have solved the problem.
But it had me worried as the instructions in the manual differed from what I was actually doing on the screen.

Speedy Gonzales
21-11-2011, 08:40 PM
There's 3 different ways you can update a BIOS on an ASUS mobo.

The windows program (ASUSupdate). But you should load the BIOS into it (dont let it find then update it). It'll probably freeze and kill it. Unless the mobo supports crashfree BIOS. Most of the recent ASUS mobos do.

The old way use a DOS floppy or USB flash drive (if the mobo supports USB)

Or the easiest way EZ-Flash. Thats if the BIOS supports it

Agent_24
21-11-2011, 10:10 PM
Yeah forget those Winflash programs unless you have no other option. They have the highest chance of failure and bricking your system, then you can be down for some real fun trying to fix it (although not impossible, but do require the right tools and skills)

EZ-Flash and such utilities are better but not always bug free either.


Personally I boot plain DOS from somewhere, usually a floppy disk, and flash that way, never had an issue doing it that way either.

Snorkbox
21-11-2011, 11:01 PM
@ Agent_24. Agreed.

Speedy Gonzales
22-11-2011, 07:21 AM
Some BIOS's can be buggy too. The other computer here, the latest BIOS USED to corrupt the BIOS (funny how it used to corrupt itself when it felt like it). It used to stuff itself up like every 6 mths. But the latest BIOS is on it now. And its been fine for a while.

And another computer I fixed, the latest BIOS made it loop continuously. If you turned it on, it would never boot into windows (it would loop, after detecting what was in the system). Too bad if you dont use floppies. Unless the system supported USB, you wont be able to flash a BIOS

Driftwood
22-11-2011, 07:54 AM
I may have caused my problem.
Unsure of the mobo's history I reset the bios before putting it all together.
In hindsight it may have been better not to.

Agent_24
22-11-2011, 08:50 AM
And another computer I fixed, the latest BIOS made it loop continuously. If you turned it on, it would never boot into windows (it would loop, after detecting what was in the system). Too bad if you dont use floppies. Unless the system supported USB, you wont be able to flash a BIOS

Or if you have a hardware EEPROM programmer like I do ;)


I may have caused my problem.
Unsure of the mobo's history I reset the bios before putting it all together.
In hindsight it may have been better not to.

No, if the BIOS on there didn't support the CPU, it would never support the CPU.
Resettng the BIOS only puts user-changeable settings back to defaults.
It does NOT revert the BIOS to an older version.

Driftwood
22-11-2011, 12:41 PM
This systerm I have put together has same specs to another I have here, so thought I would compare porformance index figures.
Identical except for memory which is 6.7 & 6.9
Have even swapped the memory with the same result.
Different mobos, P5K-E/Wifi & GA-EP35-DS3
Gigabyte has the higher reading.
Also has a higher ouput PSU, don't know if that would have any bearing.
Had visions of keeping the Asus board for my self, thinking it would be a better board.

Agent_24
22-11-2011, 01:08 PM
I would keep the Gigabyte anyway. Have now had too many failures with Asus boards to want to buy them again.

Driftwood
22-11-2011, 01:29 PM
Just thought of something else too.
The Gigabyte has a E8400 & the Asus has a E8500

dugimodo
22-11-2011, 01:37 PM
It's possible the memory is clocking slower on one machine for some reason. I wouldn't worry about it, that rating is not particularly precise and memory speed has a fairly minor impact on system performance especially with such a small difference.


I would keep the Gigabyte anyway. Have now had too many failures with Asus boards to want to buy them again.

Myself I'm the other way round, I like gigabyte but have had more problems with it than ASUS. I don't think it's a very accurate method using personal experience to compare brands unless you have a decently large sample to go on (maybe you do, personally I don't). Better to try and get statistics for brand failure rates from somewhere, anyone can have a bad run with a normally good brand.

It's Human nature to focus on the negative experiences for these things, for example I have owned one XFX motherboard briefly and it was a complete dog so I'd never buy another (if they even still make them) but they may actually make great gear and I'll never know because of one bad product (was an X58 MB when they were new and had issues with RAM). My current system has given me quite a lot of grief and is the first gigabyte based system I have built in a while whereas my other 2 machines are both asus and trouble free..

Agent_24
22-11-2011, 02:30 PM
Myself I'm the other way round, I like gigabyte but have had more problems with it than ASUS. I don't think it's a very accurate method using personal experience to compare brands unless you have a decently large sample to go on (maybe you do, personally I don't). Better to try and get statistics for brand failure rates from somewhere, anyone can have a bad run with a normally good brand.

I agree with that, But I back my experiences up with information from the badcaps.net forums. There are several guys there who repair motherboards for a living (or part of it) and they have come to the conclusion that Asus are not that reliable anymore. Not always capacitor failures either, just random "nothing visually wrong but board won't work" failures (the problem I have had with most of my Asus failures) They just seem to die for no apparent reason.


It's Human nature to focus on the negative experiences for these things, for example I have owned one XFX motherboard briefly and it was a complete dog so I'd never buy another (if they even still make them) but they may actually make great gear and I'll never know because of one bad product (was an X58 MB when they were new and had issues with RAM). My current system has given me quite a lot of grief and is the first gigabyte based system I have built in a while whereas my other 2 machines are both asus and trouble free..

I buy MSI boards now. Had one that seemed flaky, but the rest are just fine. Will buy MSI again, would consider Gigabyte. Asus only if I was desperate.

XFX might be OK now but their Geforce 8\9 series cards often used Sacon FZ capacitors (one of the worst) - many cheap brands also used these. If you can replace them with something decent the cards will be OK but leave them in and it's a time-bomb.

No comment on ECS or other el-cheapo brands (but the boards that use solid polymer capacitors might not be too bad)

Driftwood
22-11-2011, 02:30 PM
Just swaped the hard drive from the Gigabyte to the Asus & it booted right up.