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Ninjabear
18-10-2011, 09:27 PM
Question for all of u

If you sign up broadband max speed and you ask the sales rep , How fast will my broadband be and he the rep says "up to 100mbps" depending on your geographical area. Is that false advertising?

We are just talking about ADSL2, not cable

wainuitech
18-10-2011, 09:48 PM
No its not false advertising -- the key words they use "up to 100mbps" that would be under ideal circumstances , they also forgot depending on the Internet speed over all, time of day, where traffic is coming from, etc.

Take at the moment :mad: -- anything over seas ( mainly the USA) is either dead / pages not loading or so slow dial up would be faster, even loading PF1 had to have several goes other wise it times out.

Yet earlier today I was hitting the max speed I can get on my plan 1.5MB /sec

mikebartnz
18-10-2011, 10:41 PM
No.

goodiesguy
18-10-2011, 10:52 PM
No, it isn't false advertising.

Ninjabear
19-10-2011, 02:26 AM
but as we know ADSl2 cant achieve up to 100mbps . Doesn't that sound a bit fake?

Paul.Cov
19-10-2011, 06:41 AM
It's very analogous to buying a car to use on the Auckland motorway. The car salesman is quite correct to say the car is good up to 160km/hr, however, due to circumstances beyond his and your control, there will be times when traffic volume, road works, accidents and narrowed atreries result in you going much, much slower, and at times at a crawl.

pctek
19-10-2011, 06:49 AM
Up to is anything in between 0 and 100.

So 1, 2, 2.5, all comes under the category.

Safari
19-10-2011, 07:31 AM
Up to is anything in between 0 and 100.

So 1, 2, 2.5, all comes under the category.

It is not possible to get 100mbps on ADSL2
Up to 24Mbps would be a more reasonable response

Chilling_Silence
19-10-2011, 07:57 AM
For ADSL2+ I too would have presumed that 24mbps would be the maximum.

If it was VDSL2, then it's entirely accurate that it *could* be up to 100mbps...

wainuitech
19-10-2011, 08:07 AM
You also have to keep in mind that you were talking to a rep -- did he have it written down on paper or show where it was advertised at a certain speed -- if not then its very hard to prove what was actually said. He also may have gotten his bits and bytes confused. :)

Chilling_Silence
19-10-2011, 09:02 AM
True but either was, 100m/bits vs m/bytes is still *far* above 24m/bit ;)

But I'm with wainuitech, unless it was in writing, you're basically gonna be fighting a losing battle trying to prove it.

dugimodo
19-10-2011, 09:38 AM
Sales reps aren't generally technical people, he probably just doesn't understand enough to give you a better answer. They are likely told to say told "up to 100M" in preperation for VDSL offerings, so it's kinda correct that could could theoretically achieve that under Ideal conditions at some future date...

They would be better saying something like "typically between 8-24M with but could be as low as 2M and theoretically as high as 100M" can't see them doing that though.

Chilling_Silence
19-10-2011, 09:55 AM
I wouldn't say in prep for the VDSL2 offerings personally, AFAIK Telecom has been rating it as "up to 80mbps".
100mbps is the number being thrown around by the FTTH rollout.

Definitely a confused sales rep though ;)

Lurking
19-10-2011, 10:23 AM
Take at the moment :mad: -- anything over seas ( mainly the USA) is either dead / pages not loading or so slow dial up would be faster, even loading PF1 had to have several goes other wise it times out.

Wai, you got that right, our cable has been diabolical for the last few days, similar to dial-up speed.

Could be that stupid WRC thingy.

Lurking.

Ps. that's using IE8, Chrome and FF7.01, the latter is the worst.

lurks.

Peter H
19-10-2011, 11:21 AM
Agree with that - last night, on cable, couldn't get any USA sites. BBC was ok and nz.

Agent_24
19-10-2011, 12:58 PM
How fast will my broadband be and he the rep says "up to 100mbps" depending on your geographical area.

Sounds correct to me.

The term "broadband" does not exclusively mean ADSL, in fact it does not specifically apply to any connection type in particular.

"Any connection to the customer of 256 kbit/s or greater is more concisely considered broadband Internet access"