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tuiruru
18-09-2011, 01:09 PM
SWMBO recently cane across the attached ad.

I presume it works, but I'm a bit dubious about the quality. Is there another way of doing it? We've only got laptops so does that mean there's no way to hook them up to our sound system?

To be honest, this is the first time I've considered transferring cassettes so I'm operating pretty much in the dark

All suggestions (preferably cheap) welcome

Thanks

fred_fish
18-09-2011, 01:44 PM
All you need is ANY tape playing device with a line out (presumably you already have one), a line in on your PC (presumably you already have one - may be labeled MIC IN), a suitable cable to connect the two (~$10) and some (free) software to record / split / encode it (Audacity etc).

That just looks like a fairly expensive (and ugly) tape deck. It probably comes with some "easy to use" software which may or may not do the job to your liking.

Driftwood
18-09-2011, 02:43 PM
Rip Vinyl works good.
If you set it up right it will separate all the tracks too

kahawai chaser
18-09-2011, 03:14 PM
Try Music Match (Jukebox) (http://musicmatch-jukebox.com/), It used to auto split the tracks, and can create tags (info about the track). If you have dozens of tracks you may want an organizer, like Media Monkey (http://www.mediamonkey.com/) or the free version of The Godfather (http://www.free-codecs.com/download/The_GodFather.htm). Best to have good quality music tapes, otherwise sometimes can spend a long time doing reverb, noise removal, boosting, filtering, etc with Audacity or the more advanced Cool Edit Pro 2 (http://www.softpedia.com/get/Multimedia/Audio/Audio-Editors-Recorders/Cool-Edit-Pro.shtml) (Adobe Audition). You can buy hand held USB tape cassette to mp3 encoders/converters at Fish Pond NZ. Also depending on your stereo outputs, you may need single/twin adapters for RCA to 3.5 mm plugs amongst others.

fred_fish
18-09-2011, 03:18 PM
... or just find the title online ...:blush:

Did you already pay for the content or just the bits of plastic it originally arrived on? :devil

R.M.
18-09-2011, 04:47 PM
+ 2 for Audacity

tuiruru
18-09-2011, 06:17 PM
... or just find the title online ...:blush:

Did you already pay for the content or just the bits of plastic it originally arrived on? :devil

Yep - these are legitimately, shop bought,commercially produced Music Cassettes..

Driftwood
19-09-2011, 07:32 AM
Just the downloading part that could be ??

tuiruru
19-09-2011, 08:50 AM
Just the downloading part that could be ??

???? I don't understand?

dugimodo
19-09-2011, 08:52 AM
Yeah just connect a tape deck to your pc and use some of the software suggested above. One thing in favour of cassettes is the tape noise is very predictable so software can remove it very effectively.
I've done a couple a long time ago using windows sound recorder and nero wave editor (from nero 6) and was very happy with the results. I just sampled a section of the "silent" lead in as a noise profile and then selected the whole recording and removed it. The result sounds very good. I used a crappy worn out old el-cheapo walkman and still got good results :)

Trev
19-09-2011, 08:56 AM
Personally if the cassete is available on CD I wouldn't bother transferring.
:)

tuiruru
19-09-2011, 09:01 AM
Yeah just connect a tape deck to your PC and use some of the software suggested above. One thing in favour of cassettes is the tape noise is very predictable so software can remove it very effectively.
I've done a couple a long time ago using windows sound recorder and nero wave editor (from nero 6) and was very happy with the results. I just sampled a section of the "silent" lead in as a noise profile and then selected the whole recording and removed it. The result sounds very good. I used a crappy worn out old el-cheapo walkman and still got good results :)

It's a laptop, so the only way in is via the MIC socket or a USB (as far as I know). So a simple "line in" cable should do it? Is that the red, whit or yellow one?

Whenu
19-09-2011, 09:09 AM
A stereo 3.5 headphone jack connected to a plug that matches an output on the cassette player, usually RCA plugs, into the mic input on the lappie will do it, then Audacity to record

Burnzee
19-09-2011, 09:37 AM
Hi Tuiruru

All these type of ads make it appear quite easy to convert your vinyl or cassettes into great playing and sounding songs. It is true in theory at least, in reality it is damn hard work!!

First thing, you have to understand the copyright law. You own the cassette or the record, if you like the plastic. You DO NOT own the content!! Therefore you have no rights in law to change the media ie, to take the audio and put it on a CD or on a hard drive, without permission of the copyright holder. Do not get confused between American Law and New Zealand Law. There is no such thing as Fair Play Rights in New Zealand.

Now consider this, no combination of cassette player, cables and/or computer/s is going to automatically create nice sounding CD Quality sounds. For a start all forms of tape is inherently noisily-not to mention clicks and other stray noises. Most haven't even been played for years. This can cause slack and tight spots on the same tape!!. There's some great recording software out there sure, some for free. Despite this, you got work to do, boy oh, lots of work!! Recording, Noise Removal, Splitting, Tagging and Artwork. If you are prepared to do all this, then with practice you can do a reasonable job.

Here's some good advice - unless you have a rare tape with rare songs, save yourself a heartache, not to mention hard work - go buy a legal digital copy.


BURNZEE

tuiruru
19-09-2011, 09:44 AM
Hi Tuiruru

All these type of ads make it appear quite easy to convert your vinyl or cassettes into great playing and sounding songs. It is true in theory at least, in reality it is damn hard work!!

First thing, you have to understand the copyright law. You own the cassette or the record, if you like the plastic. You DO NOT own the content!! Therefore you have no rights in law to change the media ie, to take the audio and put it on a CD or on a hard drive, without permission of the copyright holder. Do not get confused between American Law and New Zealand Law. There is no such thing as Fair Play Rights in New Zealand.

Now consider this, no combination of cassette player, cables and/or computer/s is going to automatically create nice sounding CD Quality sounds. For a start all forms of tape is inherently noisily-not to mention clicks and other stray noises. Most haven't even been played for years. This can cause slack and tight spots on the same tape!!. There's some great recording software out there sure, some for free. Despite this, you got work to do, boy oh, lots of work!! Recording, Noise Removal, Splitting, Tagging and Artwork. If you are prepared to do all this, then with practice you can do a reasonable job.

Here's some good advice - unless you have a rare tape with rare songs, save yourself a heartache, not to mention hard work - go buy a legal digital copy.


BURNZEE

Thanks Burnzee and everyone else.

I'll now run this lot past SWMBO in an effort to convince her that if she wants the job done she will have to invest the time herself (equality of opportunity :).

Many thanks once again :thumbs:

Sick Puppy
19-09-2011, 10:09 AM
Thanks also guys, I was literally considering my options with all this because I am in the same boat with tapes, and wondering what the heck to do with them!


Here's some good advice - unless you have a rare tape with rare songs, save yourself a heartache, not to mention hard work - go buy a legal digital copy.
I have a promotional tape from Sony for their then-new Mega Bass line up, and another one from a music magazine. Both were late 80's maybe? Not a hope of getting CD's for them, and the magazine one... let's just say they weren't smash hits! lol ;)

Thankfully I've just realised I have the stuff to do all this, so just need the software, and will be having a crack soon. Thanks everyone!

tuiruru
19-09-2011, 10:25 AM
Thanks also guys, I was literally considering my options with all this because I am in the same boat with tapes, and wondering what the heck to do with them!


I have a promotional tape from Sony for their then-new Mega Bass line up, and another one from a music magazine. Both were late 80's maybe? Not a hope of getting CD's for them, and the magazine one... let's just say they weren't smash hits! lol ;)

Thankfully I've just realised I have the stuff to do all this, so just need the software, and will be having a crack soon. Thanks everyone!

That's a point. Some of my/her stuff is from wayback and it might take more time to track down than transfer. We're not High Fidelity buffs - if I get a spare decade I might have a fiddle to see if the sound quality is acceptable. (Whoops!! - I said she was going to do all this, didn't I?)

Burnzee
19-09-2011, 03:05 PM
Hi Guys

Let me tell a true story this thread actually stirred up from the murky depths of my brain. I call it My Ole To The Little Cassette Tape.

Many years ago,one of my friends knew a Country Music Singer. He had recorded some cassettes of his material. While not suitable for wide release, the cassettes meant a lot to him. His house got totaled in a well known flood in New Zealand. Anyway, after the event, when everything had dried out, my friend and him returned to survey the damage. What was left was covered in stinking mud except a tree which had been bowled over but had a large branch poking sky wards. Unbelievably, caught in the branch was one cassette tape!!

Through our mutual "friend" - this cassette found it's way to me with the added incentive, - you can fix it, can't yah Burnzee, you know about 'puters, electronics and stuff!! Let's just say a friend in need is a pain in the a*se!! Why do I always get the hard jobs? For Christ's Sake, the cassette was covered in green crud with it's guts hanging out, also covered with green crud but otherwise complete.

After obtaining the necessary permissions and with the strict understanding everything I attempted would be done with the greatest of care but no responsibility, like the fool these guys thought I was, I started ...

Slowly cleaning and wiping with a soft cloth with the minimum of water, the shell of the cassette was cleaned. This took some time but it had a fused shell so this was easier than just changing shells which is what I would have done otherwise. I checked to see if any crap had got inside, there was nothing to be seen through the little window. Some must have got in, surely the hell. It was at this point my attitude started to change. What are the odds of this little cassette making it this far. Something started to make me sorry for the damn thing!! I vowed to give it my best shot.

Decided to slowly pull the whole tape out and then rinse the shell with clean running cold water. Turned it over and attempted to get out as much water as possible. This water had not visibly done any damage to the tape that was left in the shell. Anyway this cassette had seen water before and desperate times call for desperate methods!! Under the circumstances the shell was now looking quite good and decided this was the only real way to clean the tape. Out came the soft cloth with a minimum of water. Once all the crud had be wiped off, the cassette and tape - carefully laid out - was left on my workbench in my shed for about two or three weeks to dry. Kept my friend updated through the whole operation.

After the drying period, the tape was carefully inspected and wound back into it's shell. If you think about what this tape had gone through, no one, least of all me, had any rights to expect sound to come out of it!! But sound did come from it and considering it's history, pretty damn good sound. Not state of the art, sure but I could work with it. Didn't dare play it right through !!

Having one of the first versions of Audacity on my computer, I tentatively recorded the cassette. Once in digital format and saved on hard drive, I proceeded on to the noise removal stage. Now at random, I listened to various tracks. One of the songs, A Closer Walk With Thee sounded amazing clear so I decided to play around with this. I put a bit of echo in, well a lot of echo really. The idea was to make it sound like the singer was in an old stone church and it sounded great. Did a CD copy of this one song and again through my friend sent it to the singer. Back came the reply, Hell that's fantastic, reckon you can get that quality from the whole tape. No, I replied because I had now listened to parts of all the songs and some were sightly muffled. But I would try my best.

To make a long story short - bit late for that!! - I did my thing and eventually a new CD was reproduced with it's label all printed in glorious colour. Even made an insert label again in colour. Looked quite professional in the end. The sound was quite good generally but again not state of the art. The Owner was wrapped. Made no money or reward from it except knowing this is all this guy had from working his bum off for all these years. Gave me a warm feeling and no it wasn't because I had peed in my pants!!

Talk about rare songs in a rare tape!!

BURNZEE

dugimodo
19-09-2011, 10:08 PM
Well Burnzee's story aside it's not hard work, just time consuming. And a good condition tape can give surprisingly good results. That said I'd agree if it's easily available it might be better and easier just to get another copy.
One of the tapes I did is impossible to get on CD unless you know the artist and came out sounding great (actually I told him I'd done it and he said I coulda copied the orginal lol :)).

You can use the mic in jack but just be careful with level settings, if you set it too high it'll distort. Technically it also could be an impedance mismatch which will affect the sound, but in practice it's fine.
Best to record a short sample a few times rather than the whole thing until you are happy with how it sounds. Have a play.

Trev
20-09-2011, 08:21 AM
I actually have a commercial tape from the early 70s which I use to play now and then, earlier this year it finally came out on cd which I bought.
:)

tuiruru
20-09-2011, 08:25 AM
I actually have a commercial tape from the early 70s which I use to play now and then, earlier this year it finally came out on cd which I bought.
:)

Oh - you have to "share" with us what it was!!

Trev
20-09-2011, 08:34 AM
Not a problem. It is called An Astromusical Odyssey (Sounds Galactic) by John Keating and his orchestra. Also on the cd is another album called Sounds of the Stars. It is recorded in Phase 4 Stereo. I got it from England from Presto Classical. It cost me $25 NZ including air freight. It was remastered by Michael J Dutton. You can check him out at www.duttonvocalion.co.uk
:)

tuiruru
20-09-2011, 08:50 AM
Not a problem. It is called An Astromusical Odyssey (Sounds Galactic) by John Keating and his orchestra. Also on the cd is another album called Sounds of the Stars. It is recorded in Phase 4 Stereo. I got it from England from Presto Classical. It cost me $25 NZ including air freight. It was remastered by Michael J Dutton. You can check him out at www.duttonvocalion.co.uk
:)

Thanks Trev - An window into you 70's psyche perhaps?!

Trev
20-09-2011, 08:56 AM
Yes I was into electronic music at the time. I think it was called Moog music.
:)

tuiruru
20-09-2011, 09:26 AM
Yes I was into electronic music at the time. I think it was called Moog music.
:)

That would be because of the synthesizers, which became a generic term - here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moog_synthesizer)and here (http://www.moogmusic.com/products)

Trev
20-09-2011, 09:30 AM
Yes I see they mention Autoban by Kraftwerk which was a favorite of mine.
:)