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NZHawk
05-09-2011, 10:24 AM
concrete walls
steel reinforcement
wants wireless broadband accessibility throughout house.

any suggestions on how to achieve this with such a structure.

Thank you

wratterus
05-09-2011, 10:27 AM
EOP + several routers?

http://pbtech.co.nz/index.php?z=p&p=NETNCMP204&name=NETCOMM-NP204-200Mbps-Ethernet-Powerline-Adapters-

http://pbtech.co.nz/index.php?z=p&p=NETTPL0211&name=TP-Link-TL-PA211-200Mbps-Powerline-Ethernet--Adapt

http://pbtech.co.nz/index.php?z=p&p=NETNGR1130588&name=Netgear-XAVB2001-Powerline-AV-Ethernet-2pc-Kit-Sli

http://pbtech.co.nz/index.php?z=p&p=NETTPL0212&name=TP-Link-TL-PA211-KIT-200Mbps-Powerline-Ethernet-Ad

http://pbtech.co.nz/index.php?z=p&p=NETNGR1130593&name=Netgear-XAVB1004-Powerline-AV-Ethernet-Kit-with-4-

or a bunch of these maybe

http://pbtech.co.nz/index.php?z=p&p=NETTPL0730&name=TP-LINK-TL-WA730RE-Wireless-Range-Extender-boosts-

NZHawk
05-09-2011, 10:35 AM
Sorry EOP? - what does that mean?

Speedy Gonzales
05-09-2011, 10:41 AM
Ethernet over power?

NZHawk
05-09-2011, 10:43 AM
Thank you!

Will explore your suggestions

mikebartnz
05-09-2011, 01:24 PM
Could you set the router up in the attic space.

Billy T
05-09-2011, 01:30 PM
Have you actually tried it, or done any field strength checks yet?

Once dry, concrete is not a great attenuator of RF signals and the reinforcing should only affect it significantly if it is directly between the transmitting antenna and the target computers, and is also very close to the radiating antenna (i.e. screening it).

Better antennas at both ends of the path might help, as might winding a few turns of wire around the transmitting antenna and running it along or up the all for several metres.

In a previous thread I mantioned how a few metres of wire terminated in a few turns around my mp3 FM stereo transmitter extended the range from just inside my house to two or three streets away.

Range is more about antenna efficiency and receiver sensitivity than it is about radiated power, and amateur radio enthusiasts have established two-way contact halfway around the globe on not much more power than your modem puts out, albeit at lower frequencies of course.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

NZHawk
05-09-2011, 01:31 PM
mikebartnz: good suggestion, I will investigate that as a possibility as well - thank you

NZHawk
05-09-2011, 01:34 PM
Thank you Billy T - great perspective. They had previously had a wireless router in the house but were not able to get a signal at the other end of the house. - coiled wire it is.

dugimodo
05-09-2011, 02:12 PM
I'd be curious as to how the coiled wire coiled help. I didn't think you could induce current flow into an unterminated piece of wire, it has nowhere to go. Perhaps if you earthed one end of the wire, or made a large loop?
If you say it works I'll believe you but logic suggests it shouldn't. I was planning on trying something similar on the reciever of my garage door opener but a radio tech told me it wouldn't work maybe I'll ignore that and try anyway (it has terrible range and sometimes doesn't work)

PENTIUM
05-09-2011, 05:55 PM
Dugimodo, capacitive coupling does not require a completed circuit.
However, the power mains method looks to be the best solution

dpDesignz
05-09-2011, 06:18 PM
http://powerline.dlink.com.au/