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wratterus
23-06-2011, 12:37 PM
Help! :p

I want to upgrade my PSU, but am having a difficult time deciding which one to get...

At the moment I've got a really nice SilverStone 750w, but it's not modular.

The only real stipulation is that the PSU is 100% modular. 750w is good. I would like to individually sleeve a lot of the cables later on, for a bit of an experimental project so i partly want a fully modular PSU for that, and partly cause it looks mint and is soooo much easier for cable management.

At the moment I've narrowed it down to three -

The Corsair AX750 (http://www.computerlounge.co.nz/components/componentview.asp?partid=13408), the Seasonic X-760 (http://www.computerlounge.co.nz/components/componentview.asp?partid=14869) and the SilverStone Strider Gold 750w (http://www.computerlounge.co.nz/components/componentview.asp?partid=14921)

All three meet my requirements, and are roughly the same price. I like the black cables on the Corsair, but was wondering if that might make things difficult later on for figuring out which cable goes where with the sleeving.

Does anyone own one of these? Can you make any comment on any of them?

Thanks. :)

PS - See the attached pic for the type of Sleeving I'm hoping to go for down the track, from here (http://en.mdpc-x.com/mdpc-sleeve/sleeve.htm). Even choosing colour combos is difficult, but that's for another day. :punk

1101
23-06-2011, 01:02 PM
Possibly all made by the same company (??)

have a looksee here
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/power-supply-oem-manufacturer,2913.html

gary67
23-06-2011, 01:08 PM
You got a Window in your case?

wratterus
23-06-2011, 01:25 PM
Possibly all made by the same company (??)

have a looksee here
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/power-supply-oem-manufacturer,2913.html

Thanks - I knew Seasonic made the Corsair AX series, I think Channel Well make most of the HX and TX series? No doubt the info is on that page.

Looks like a company called Enhance made the SilverStone, never heard of them. I thought the SilverStone had a 5 year warranty for some reason, not too sure where I saw that though. I prefer the Seasonic or Corsair anyway.


You got a Window in your case?

Very much so. Sorry about the awful quality pics...:p

inphinity
23-06-2011, 01:57 PM
Personally I'd get the Corsair. Longest warranty :P

Gobe1
23-06-2011, 02:34 PM
That is a massive case Wratt...Antec 12 hundred??
I have a few Antec 900 two's here, real nice for cooling

I always thought the modular PSUs had their own sleeved cables, or are do you want to modd them to your taste?

Iantech
23-06-2011, 02:59 PM
The only real stipulation is that the PSU is 100% modular.

Just curious, why the stipulation to be modular?

They appear to be less efficient and more unreliable from what I have read about them.
Cheers

inphinity
23-06-2011, 03:18 PM
Just curious, why the stipulation to be modular?

They appear to be less efficient and more unreliable from what I have read about them.
Cheers

With junky quality, sure, but with quality gear the difference is so negligible as to be irrelevant.

DeSade
23-06-2011, 03:43 PM
I have used Corsair for a while now, both fixed and modular. There is NO difference as far as I can see. The reliability has always been 100% with all Corsair PSU's that I have brought.

Corsair will always be my first choice for PSU and it would take a lot to change that.

Iantech
23-06-2011, 03:48 PM
With junky quality, sure, but with quality gear the difference is so negligible as to be irrelevant.

Valid point, so if the difference is so negligible, why stipulate on having one?

Food for thought from Toms Hardware


Enermax, Seasonic, and Corsair all told us that if you're looking to maximize efficiency, go for a non-modular PSU.

Are the differences great? No one gave us any hard numbers, but they did indicate that the numbers are measurable. PC Power & Cooling, now part of OCZ, says the same thing:

Due to their look, convenience, and cost savings for manufacturers, modular plugs have become a popular power supply feature. Unfortunately, there has been little or no discussion of the impact of this feature on overall performance and reliability. The fact is, modular plugs limit power by adding to electrical resistance. The voltage drop can be as much as would occur in 2 feet of standard wire. Worse yet, modular plugs utilize delicate pins that can easily loosen, corrode, and burn, creating the potential for a major system failure. That's why professional system builders specify uninterrupted wire!

So in the end, you have to choose: do you go with a modular PSU for cable management and appearance, or do you spring for a hard-wired PSU?

inphinity
23-06-2011, 03:52 PM
Valid point, so if the difference is so negligible, why stipulate on having one?

Because cable management is much easier with a modular PSU. Yes, there is a measurable difference, but it's small enough that imo it doesn't have a real-world impact.

wratterus
23-06-2011, 04:18 PM
Because cable management is much easier with a modular PSU. Yes, there is a measurable difference, but it's small enough that imo it doesn't have a real-world impact.

That's my thoughts exactly - looks and cable management, which, to a certain extent, can be the same thing. Put it this way - for my application, the benefits of going modular far outweigh the drawbacks.


That is a massive case Wratt...Antec 12 hundred??
I have a few Antec 900 two's here, real nice for cooling

I always thought the modular PSUs had their own sleeved cables, or are do you want to modd them to your taste?

Yep, the twelvehundred. I wanted a Corsair 800D, but the budget didn't quite stretch that far at the time. i'm very happy wit it though, it is ever so slightly vulgar when viewed at some angles, but not enough to annoy me. The cooling, cable management options and internal layout are very good. Probably the only major thing I think it's missing is a hole in the motherboard backplate for fitting aftermarket CPU coolers. If you want to do anything with the cooler - out comes the motherboard. nothing a bit of work with a dremel and file won't fix though, I should really get around to doing that sometime.

As for the cabling, yes, often the major cables are kinda sleeved, but I'm talking about real sleeving (http://psychosleeve.com/). :D

Gobe1
23-06-2011, 04:53 PM
As for the cabling, yes, often the major cables are kinda sleeved, but I'm talking about real sleeving (http://psychosleeve.com/). :D

:stare: Whoa that looks like a lot of work

EDIT: Prolimatech coolers dont need upgraded :) Unless you are going liquid nitrogen of course

wratterus
23-06-2011, 05:25 PM
:stare: Whoa that looks like a lot of work

EDIT: Prolimatech coolers dont need upgraded :) Unless you are going liquid nitrogen of course

Yeah maximum work. :p

I've been looking at a few mods on bit-tech recently that have had individually sleeved cables, and decided I'd like to give it a go. The Prolimatech is great, i have that fan running at about 800RPM, it's barely audible and the CPU (i7 860) runs around 30 degrees. pretty sure I could actually get away with passively cooling the CPU, with the amount of air passing through that case. If I conservatively averaged the 120mm fans at 90CFM @ 1500RPM then the thing would be moving over 650 CFM, or a massive 39,000 CFM every hour!! The noisest things in that case are the graphics card and PSU

needless to say the fans are all on minimum speed, at this time of year. :p

pctek
23-06-2011, 07:01 PM
I prefer the Seasonic or Corsair anyway.




+1

BTW, love the pretty blue and black cabling on the PSU pic.

LOVE the 2nd pic in your case pics.:drool

autechre
24-06-2011, 09:11 AM
+1 for Corsair. I have the HX650 in one machine and have had no issues with it.

wratterus
24-06-2011, 03:39 PM
LOVE the 2nd pic in your case pics.:drool

Thanks! It's a bit messy in there at the moment, will get this new PSU soon and do some real cable management. Might get a bit more lighting too, CCFL or LED strip, hiding behind something.

Billy T
24-06-2011, 10:01 PM
The fact is, modular plugs limit power by adding to electrical resistance. The voltage drop can be as much as would occur in 2 feet of standard wire. Worse yet, modular plugs utilize delicate pins that can easily loosen, corrode, and burn, creating the potential for a major system failure. Load of nonsense IMHO The voltage drop would be a few millivolts, which would make no difference whatsoever to system performance and reliability.

Motherboards and peripherals are chock full of wafer-thin tracks pared-down to the bare minimum cross-section necessary to carry the required current. There are also plenty of inter-connections none of which will spontaneously loosen or corrode, and most won't burn, simply because they don't carry enough current to generate heat. The voltage drop "can be" several millivolts but almost certainly is not. Not that it would matter, a 3mV drop at 12 amps creates 36mW of heat. That wouldn't raise the temperature enough to burn the eyelashes off an ant.

It is quack geek 'science', just like the special high cost power cables for Hi Fi systems that are fed via many metres of ordinary 1.5mm TPS (2.5mm if you are lucky) inside the walls of the room, and terminate inside the equipment at a couple of equally scrawny conductors feeding a power transforner wound with even smaller copper wire.

At the end of the chain is a an electro-acoustic transducer (speaker system) that has more peaks and nulls in its frequency response than the Southern Alps, and if you recorded the speaker output and compared it to the signal input to the amp, you would think they were on separate planets.

The human ear and human brain are very egotistical, and tell you exactly what they want you to hear.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)