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pctek
08-04-2011, 07:58 AM
DIY is in danger as high incomes and lack of skills turn new generations off power tools.
The alarming prediction comes from John Hartmann, who moved from the world's biggest home improvement retailer Home Depot in the United States 14 months ago to become CEO of Mitre10 in New Zealand.

As a consequence, the likes of Mitre10 and Bunnings were modifying their behaviours, changing their mix. "There's a noticable trend in the space to more consumer products, there are more toasters, there are more dishwashers," said Morris.

"This appears to be global phenomenon. The UK's Daily Mirror reported [in January] that this year, DIY skills will be extinct by 2048 stating that DIY skills are becoming a lost art as men prefer to fix a PC than change a plug.''

It said that if interest in home improvement kept falling, 20 per cent fewer men will know basic handyman skills by 2030 and DIY will be unknown by 2048. "They also pointed out that only 32 per cent of men under 25 were able to fix the last practical dilemma they had in their home compared with 83 per cent of over 55s,'' he said. "Seventy one per cent of men in their 70s learned basic DIY skills from their fathers. Now only 44 per cent of men are taught DIY, with a steep decline expected to continue.'' Even making repairs was a dying art, Hartmann said.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/4862084/Do-it-yourself-a-dying-art

gary67
08-04-2011, 08:04 AM
I hate conversations that start with "my husband/partner started this small job" knowing full well they want you to fix some major stuff up. Plus with the rules being tightened as to what you can and cannot do to your own home less people are inclined to DIY. Still it keeps the trades employed as people are too lazy and would prefer to pay for services. Unfortunately I'm no longer able to make use of peoples laziness since I wrecked my shoulder again but its kept me employed for the last 26 years

prefect
08-04-2011, 08:09 AM
I believe it, my kids cant use a saw or hammer and they arent interested in using them.
When they are forced to use a saw it looks like a woman with a gun very ungainly and unnatural.

gary67
08-04-2011, 08:34 AM
My step son is very practical for a 16 year old, he actually wants to learn stuff and in some things is much better than I am

Chilling_Silence
08-04-2011, 09:08 AM
It was interesting, two weeks after my wife and I moved in to our first home, we had a problem with the toilet dribbling water constantly into the bowl.

Her first reaction was to call a plumber.
My first reaction was to Google for the fix.

2 minutes later I'd read a DIY How-To guide, and was off. Turns out it wasn't all that difficult to fix, only took me 5 minutes and it was good as gold!

Long live DIY!

Bobh
08-04-2011, 10:22 AM
As a schoolboy I was taught the basics of woodwork while the girls were sent to cooking classes. Later while I was at Secondary School I was also taught metal work. These classes taught me the basics of using tools.

I live in a house that was shifted onto a section. I kept my costs to a minimum. The first major jobs I did were creating drains, lawns and landscaping which I did by hand.

I recently built a pathway to my back door, something that I have never done before. I used books and the Internet as my research tools. I had to read up on council regulations (the path had to slope away from the house). The building inspector poured water on my new path to ensure the water flowed the right way. I mixed the concrete by hand using a shovel and wheel barrow using the instructions on the cement bag. The rest was common sense.

Any DIY job needs to be thought through and planned before you start it.

mikebartnz
08-04-2011, 10:33 AM
Doesn't surprise me at all as so much fixit work done around the home is done while the kids are at school and not at the weekend by dad like it used to be. Most young kids are quite keen to learn if they are around Mr Fixit.

mikebartnz
08-04-2011, 10:35 AM
The rest was common sense.
Sadly lacking these days.

wratterus
08-04-2011, 10:35 AM
I love a good bit of DIY. Always keen to give anything a go. I reckon, down here at least, the DIY spirit is still alive and well. :punk

Fifthdawn
08-04-2011, 11:33 AM
It was interesting, two weeks after my wife and I moved in to our first home, we had a problem with the toilet dribbling water constantly into the bowl.

Her first reaction was to call a plumber.
My first reaction was to Google for the fix.

2 minutes later I'd read a DIY How-To guide, and was off. Turns out it wasn't all that difficult to fix, only took me 5 minutes and it was good as gold!

Long live DIY!

Probably saved you likea trillion dollars too, those plumber call outs are a killer.

johcar
08-04-2011, 11:48 AM
I love a good bit of DIY. Always keen to give anything a go. I reckon, down here at least, the DIY spirit is still alive and well. :punk

x2

But it helps if you have mates in the trade you can call on for advice and help with the tricky bits....

prefect
08-04-2011, 12:29 PM
DIY can be a godsend for us tradesmen when the job goes wrong we can charge more for fixing their ****ups.

Roscoe
08-04-2011, 12:45 PM
Don't you think that the reaction is a bit over the top?

"DIY is in danger" and it is the "alarming prediction" sounds a bit like scaremongering. The only reason he cares is because his business depends on people who are keen on DIY. Otherwise why would he make such an "alarming prediction"?

I don't see DIY "in danger" of dying out. Not in this country.

But what if DIY does decline or even die out? Does it really matter? Surely there are far more important things to worry about? I think so.

8ftmetalhaed
08-04-2011, 01:30 PM
I'm quite happy to fix stuff. As long as I can see how to fix it, or it seems simple enough to work out.
I've sorted out a leaky toilet, a floppy shower head, a broken washing line, and a plug where the earth socket had fallen loose (that one surprised me... plugged in my belkin surge protector after using the socket for ages, no earth light = damn better get my tools)
And that's just to name a few things I've done.

At the same time, I have blown up a couple of things, but that's only after I figured they were completely buggered anyway.

I do think DIY is in decline, but only because we're being encouraged less and less to get stuck in and work it out. I mean at kindergarden, I got to use a hammer and nails to build little things out of scrap wood. I banged my thumb a bit, but I enjoyed it. Now, I doubt you'd find ANY kindy letting kids near even a plastic hammer, because the fear that they'd hit someone with it and get the kindy closed would be just too much.

Same kind of deal with some schools, but also it seems there's no interest in it now. Not sure why though. I always find an immense satisfaction in working with my hands, and always feel utterly accomplished if I can fix what I'm working on.

(edit - ps i'm 19, so there are still some youngsters keen on it)

DeSade
08-04-2011, 01:35 PM
If its not a computer that needs fixing I am not interested.

pctek
08-04-2011, 01:36 PM
Most young kids are quite keen to learn if they are around Mr Fixit.

Hmm.
Husband read it and said:
His father was utterly useless at any DIY and certainly didn't teach him. I can believe it - saw him once, mower wouldn't start so he punished it with an axe.
Shot his dog once too, I was told. Buried him under the tree in the back paddock - next morning the dog was on the doorstep.

Husband can fix almost anything (except computers but I do those).
Our son though is again, utterly useless at DIY. maybe it skips a generation?

A bit of talent for it perhaps, helps as well. My dad can fix some things, in particular woodworking stuff, car repair, electrical and such though - no.

Me, I can do some, never got into cars though - having watched it seemed to me to be far too messy, far too many immensely stuck seized bolts requiring a lot of muscle and far too complex with todays electronic everything.

Pcs though, are nice and easy and clean. I can change oil though if made to, and wheels and change batteries and check fluids in various parts and stuff like that. I can even crank a car, not that you see too many of those these days.

As for school stuff, I loathed sewing and was really pissed off I couldn't get into the woodwork class. I did get metalwork but didn't like that as much, and I can cook. Anything.

Doesn't really teach you DIY though.

SolMiester
08-04-2011, 01:50 PM
As a lad, my father was always in the garage, fixing\painting a car or doing some other thing...He used to get wary answering my never ending questions, so just told me to shut up and watch and learn!...LOL
He's still the same, always doing something in his shed!

mikebartnz
08-04-2011, 02:17 PM
so just told me to shut up and watch and learn!...LOL
So did you learn?:)

gary67
08-04-2011, 02:19 PM
My Dad is good a decorating especially wallpaper hanging but that's really about it. Me I got a dual trade carpenter and joiner and can do most stuff. Been teaching my step son who is pretty good with the tools, he is good with electronics so teaching me, I would say between us we can fix almost anything around the home or garage, now my shoulder is stuffed its more him doing and me correcting or pointing out how

johcar
08-04-2011, 02:36 PM
My Dad is good a decorating especially wallpaper hanging but that's really about it. Me I got a dual trade carpenter and joiner and can do most stuff. Been teaching my step son who is pretty good with the tools, he is good with electronics so teaching me, I would say between us we can fix almost anything around the home or garage, now my shoulder is stuffed its more him doing and me correcting or pointing out how

Ah! So you're now a consultant!! Well done! ;)

gary67
08-04-2011, 02:37 PM
Ah! So you're now a consultant!! Well done! ;)

yes indeed but the pay sucks

Terry Porritt
08-04-2011, 04:05 PM
What young person of today would know how to sole and heel a pair of shoes ? But then, who has even seen a pair of leather soled shoes in the last 30/40 odd years ? :clap

Technology changes.

However when I tried to get some carbon brushes for a couple of B&D drills and a Skill electric chain saw from Mitre10, I found they didn't stock any sort of spares anyway, not even for the makes they sold.

I thought they'd have had brushes for the models they sold which I could have adapted to fit, but no, I had to make a journey to a power tool centre in Lower Hutt.

pctek
08-04-2011, 07:01 PM
What young person of today would know how to sole and heel a pair of shoes ? But then, who has even seen a pair of leather soled shoes in the last 30/40 odd years ? :clap

.
The key cutter places repair shoes.

I'm going to have a go at making my own tea. Not exactly a repair, but it is DIY.

mikebartnz
08-04-2011, 08:09 PM
I'm going to have a go at making my own tea.
I thought it was grown.:D

decibel
08-04-2011, 08:41 PM
DIY is just changing, that's all.

My Uncle could shoe a horse but none of his son's could.

R2x1
09-04-2011, 09:39 PM
I thought it was grown.:D
That's just a rumour - what sort of plant would grow wee bags with dead stuff in 'em?