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tuiruru
14-03-2011, 11:12 AM
Just a general enquiry. It's something I've been thinking of looking at for a while but don't want to bother if there is a steep learning curve or other probs with it (lazy me? :horrified)

Thankks

Rod J
14-03-2011, 03:16 PM
I've played around with it briefly and it seems to have most of the features you'd want in a publisher application. I installed the version (1.3.3.13.svn) from the repository in Ubuntu 10.04, but it's a rather old version there (December 2008).

It can't import MS Office Publisher files unfortunately.

tuiruru
14-03-2011, 03:53 PM
It can't import MS Office Publisher files unfortunately.

:horrified :groan:

wainuitech
14-03-2011, 04:16 PM
Many other publisher software wont import or open MS .pub files.

What you can try, is the person who has Publisher save the file as .pdf, then import that into the other publisher program - trouble is, the fonts and sometimes the formatting doesn't "stick" -- Better off buying publisher if you are going to use it a lot and save the trouble.

Thats the problem with some other office programs, as good as they are simply dont work with some MS products.

fred_fish
14-03-2011, 04:28 PM
Thats the problem with some other office programs, as good as they are simply dont work with some MS products.

One could easily look at that the other way around.
MS's refusal to support open document standards is going to bite them.
People are waking up to the forced upgrade rort (.docx etc).
Cross platform and cross application document portability should be a prime consideration when considering any new software.

tuiruru
14-03-2011, 04:42 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rod J
It can't import MS Office Publisher files unfortunately.

:horrified :groan:
Yeah - I was being ironic there. The reason I was looking at Scribus was as an alternative to M$. But I can see Wainui's point - for some people, that would be a pain in the proverbila (oh - I like that typo - it was supposed to be "proverbial" - "Proverbila" sounds more forceful don't you think? :)

wainuitech
14-03-2011, 05:10 PM
One could easily look at that the other way around.
MS's refusal to support open document standards is going to bite them.
People are waking up to the forced upgrade rort (.docx etc).
Cross platform and cross application document portability should be a prime consideration when considering any new software. Microsoft Office has been around for years.


forced upgrade rort (.docx etc) BS -- not forced at all, you have the option to save in older formats, or if you want to read the .X files, simply install the Free Converters.

Many other Office products are still playing catchup. While in general business's don't like going with some of the free open source, since it simply wont work with current files/ documents, and when sending to others they have to have the program as well etc.

To be honest I have tried many different Office programs, and in the end gone back to MS simply because its far better supported.

MANY of the other publisher programs are not cross compatible with other programs, so its not just MS. If you used Page plus (a very good Publisher program) or the free version - Serif Page Plus, nothing will open that apart from PagePlus.

Simply put, if you dont like using publisher from MS - use something else, its your choice - just dont complain when no one else can open your work.
Classic example - If I were to send you a ???.aww file, bet you couldn't open it without installing the program ;)

plod
14-03-2011, 05:27 PM
Microsoft Office has been around for years.


While MS office has been around for years, publisher hasn't. Nothing is compatible with it.
As for office, yes its up too everyone else to adopt the office standard

Snorkbox
14-03-2011, 05:42 PM
While MS office has been around for years, publisher hasn't. Nothing is compatible with it.
As for office, yes its up too everyone else to adopt the office standard

Publisher 1 came out around 1991 92 as I remember it.

tuiruru
14-03-2011, 06:01 PM
Publisher 1 came out around 1991 92 as I remember it.
That's right according to this (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Publisher) Snork (scroll down). It was up against something else on the market at the time - can you remember what it was?

wainuitech
14-03-2011, 06:03 PM
Yep - 1991.

While nothing is compatible with it as mentioned before, most other Publishing programs are not cross compatible either, so no difference really.

if customers want a free Publisher program, generally I'll suggest PagePlus (http://www.serif.com/desktop-publishing-software/) - but exactly like MS publisher, its not compatible with other publishers.

Snorkbox
14-03-2011, 06:21 PM
That's right according to this (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Publisher) Snork (scroll down). It was up against something else on the market at the time - can you remember what it was?

Fairly sure it was this one:-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adobe_PageMaker

The point I was making is that Publisher HAS been around for some years now and open office does not appear to offer similar last time I looked.

tuiruru
14-03-2011, 06:31 PM
Fairly sure it was this one:-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adobe_PageMaker

The point I was making is that Publisher HAS been around for some years now and open office does not appear to offer similar last time I looked.

Yeah - I remember Aldus Pagemaker. I'm not sure there wasn't another one - ah well....

plod
14-03-2011, 06:46 PM
Yep - 1991.

While nothing is compatible with it as mentioned before, most other Publishing programs are not cross compatible either, so no difference really.

if customers want a free Publisher program, generally I'll suggest PagePlus (http://www.serif.com/desktop-publishing-software/) - but exactly like MS publisher, its not compatible with other publishers.

My point being, if you are serious about word processing use word.
Like wise for publishing use a proper publisher program. And publisher isn't

wainuitech
14-03-2011, 06:50 PM
My point being, if you are serious about word processing use word.
Like wise for publishing use a proper publisher program.:thumbs:

tuiruru
14-03-2011, 07:05 PM
Hang on I'm getting lost here.....



Like wise for publishing use a proper publisher program.

Which is?? :confused:

plod
14-03-2011, 08:04 PM
Indesign, ragemaker, illustrator, coraldraw, to name a few.
Not one program will do it all properly
We use 4 or 5 different programs depending on the purpose.

fred_fish
14-03-2011, 09:33 PM
Microsoft Office has been around for years.Yes.


BS -- not forced at all, you have the option to save in older formats, or if you want to read the .X files, simply install the Free Converters.
OK, so 'forced' is a slight exaggeration. But when .---x documents start turning up that won't open, the common solution is "Oh, you need to buy the new version of Office". Also a converter that does not cost you money, is NOT the same as a free converter. You must still enter into a licence agreement (and give up certain freedoms) in order to use it.

Many other Office products are still playing catchup. While in general business's don't like going with some of the free open source, since it simply wont work with current files/ documents, and when sending to others they have to have the program as well etc.Which is precisely the issue. Having an open document standard means that interoperability is guaranteed, and access to your own information into the future is not dependent on the whim of a single corporation.


To be honest I have tried many different Office programs, and in the end gone back to MS simply because its far better supported.Yes, MS Office is very good at what it does.


MANY of the other publisher programs are not cross compatible with other programs, so its not just MS. If you used Page plus (a very good Publisher program) or the free version - Serif Page Plus, nothing will open that apart from PagePlus.

Simply put, if you dont like using publisher from MS - use something else, its your choice - just dont complain when no one else can open your work.Yes, you are effectively limited to MS software, because "no one else can open your work". Hardly a level playing field for competition and innovation.

Classic example - If I were to send you a ???.aww file, bet you couldn't open it without installing the program ;)Again, a prime example why an open standard for various common document types is required for the future of the information society.
Imagine for example`(admittedly a fairly lame one :)) if your Toyota would not run on Holden fuel.
Standardisation is necessary for the rational functioning of a large part of modern society, and with the increasing importance of the sharing of electronic information, the means of doing this must have an open specification.

wainuitech
14-03-2011, 10:07 PM
To all of the above post - and I'm not quoting it all :)

All I will quote is:
Also a converter that does not cost you money, is NOT the same as a free converter. You must still enter into a licence agreement (and give up certain freedoms) in order to use it. Funny that - :rolleyes: Just about EVERY piece of software a person installs, no matter where or who from, paid or free, you have to click an "I agree" or similar to install - and you are entering a licence agreement the moment you do so with the vendor.

It all boils down to one simple thing:

Certain parts of MS office can be opened/ read and created with other free programs, Eg: Open office.

BUT it seems that different versions of Publishing software - no matter what software a person uses is not compatible with other vendors. So its not just Microsoft who are limiting what programs have to be used to open the publication, the majority are not compatible with others.

Heaven help us all if one day everything is compatible with what every one in the world uses, then there will nothing to moan about :D