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Question
13-03-2011, 08:18 PM
This just happened to me today. Threw some clothes, socks and a bath towel into the washing machine, and most of the shirts ended up with hair and bits of white stuff that looks like lint stuck onto the shirts. Pretty much unwearable without looking like a furball.

Any idea why? Are you not supposed to wash socks together with shirts or ?

8ftmetalhaed
13-03-2011, 08:21 PM
Towel. Or a tissue. Or undissolved washing powder.

Tasha
13-03-2011, 08:37 PM
Won't it be the fact you put a towel in with clothes?

After many years of washing and learning from my mistakes... my wash loads go as follows:
Whites and colours (bright colours inside out so they don't fade on the clothes line)
Darks (turned inside to prevent fading) with jeans, dark fluffy socks etc
Towels, tea towels, hand towels, face clothes, cleaning cloths (you get the picture)
Sheets - if they are Summer cottons, all in the same wash. If they are thick Winter sheets I wash them separate from other sets so you don't transfer coloured fluff haha

Anyway, probably not the answer you were looking for but there really is a knack to washing! You can't just throw everything that needs washing in the machine and hope for the best.

Tasha
13-03-2011, 08:38 PM
Also, the $2 shops or similar shops have those roll on lint removers that are basically big sticky rollers that will roll all that fluff and hair right back off that shirt. Much better to spend the 2 bucks than throw out a good shirt.

forrest44
13-03-2011, 08:54 PM
This just happened to me today. Threw some clothes, socks and a bath towel into the washing machine, and most of the shirts ended up with hair and bits of white stuff that looks like lint stuck onto the shirts.

Yep, same thing happened the other day to me, quite annoying really
Maybe it is something with the way the machine filters the water?

Question
13-03-2011, 08:57 PM
Uh, so why cant you throw a towel in with clothes?

Would throwing those shirts into the washing machine again remove the hair, etc? Can you name any of the $2 or similar shops?(Have yet to see any in Auckland...)

Poppa John
13-03-2011, 09:04 PM
Blocked filter? PJ

Tasha
13-03-2011, 09:14 PM
I'm guessing but figure the hair and lint came from the towel. Tricky little devils.

The original '$2 shop' would sell them as I think that's where I got mine from for... you guessed it, $2. Also, I am sure I have seen them in two packs at The Warehouse. Let me know if you want me to track one down for you and post it.

Question
13-03-2011, 09:19 PM
Hmm, theres a warehouse near me so i will check it out. Thanks!

Tasha
13-03-2011, 09:19 PM
TradeMe has a few, 'lint roller'.

Bobh
13-03-2011, 09:33 PM
Any idea why? Are you not supposed to wash socks together with shirts or ?


I was taught never to wash socks with other clothing mainly to prevent the spread of tinea and other foot deceases that were prevalent in tropical climates. I still do this in New Zealand for the same reason.

Paul.Cov
13-03-2011, 09:46 PM
Yeah, dark clothes will show the sludge and fluff from the washing detergent and particularly from new towels.

I use a lint roller rather than splitting the wash into smaller loads.
Rewashing seldom gets rid of all the bits.

Using a liquid laundry detergent , and avoiding excessive suds may help reduce the mess, but won't eliminate it totally.

pctek
14-03-2011, 07:41 AM
Uh, so why cant you throw a towel in with clothes?

Would throwing those shirts into the washing machine again remove the hair, etc? Can you name any of the $2 or similar shops?(Have yet to see any in Auckland...)
1)You get bits of fluff on jumpers and stuff.
2)Any hair or fluff gets spread to everything else.


No. It won't remove it. Your choices are picking it all off or trying the lint gadget. I've found lint gadgets to be hopeless.

$2 are all over the place - not necessarily called a $2 shop - just look for loads of junk both inside and outside.

I call them Chinese **** Shops. But they are handy for cheap odd things and usually have almost everything.

johcar
14-03-2011, 07:42 AM
Before putting clothes in the washing machine, ensure that cat/dog is not inside it.

Marnie
14-03-2011, 09:30 AM
Towels and/or socks, particularly new ones, will shed fluff and what better thing to pick it up than a dark shirt? Especially something made of cotton knit fabric.

If you have access to a dryer, throw the dry shirt in there for around 15 minutes. It's great for getting creases out of jeans, too. Lint rollers are cheap, but if you don't have one you could try a slower method of wrapping sticky tape around your hand, sticky side out and going over the fluffy areas.

I think you can still buy the lint/fluff shavers that run off batteries.

Always turn dark clothing inside out for washing and drying. As mentioned by Paul.Cov, use a liquid laundry detergent. Although I do use powder detergent for some things (well dissolved before adding clothes) my 'dark wash' is always done with the liquid.

Tasha
14-03-2011, 09:56 AM
I also have a lint remover with the batteries but that's more for pilling than fluff I think? I could be wrong. I just use it for pills.

John H
14-03-2011, 11:10 AM
I think Poppa John is the only one in this thread that has suggested you check to see if your wmachine has a filter, and see if it is blocked.

x2 for that suggestion. Our old machine had a filter that had a wee fabric bag that collected all the lint, cat hair etc. If it was full, all of that rubbish bypassed the filter and ended up evenly distributed throughout the wash.

I strongly recommend that you check for the filter, and then if you have one, empty it out. It may be the end of your troubles.

Metla
14-03-2011, 11:32 AM
Definitely look at the filter as suggested, The effects of it being blocked can occur immediately.

dugimodo
14-03-2011, 01:51 PM
I seperate my wash into "smooth" & "fluffy" - very scientific
some fabrics attract fluff & lint etc some shed it - avoid mixing the two

I also always wash my towells in a seperate load to everything else.

That said with a bit of practice you can get away with chucking most things in together, especially if none of it is new.

Question
14-03-2011, 02:56 PM
I used a machine that didnt have a filter from what i could see.

How would turning the shirt inside out help avoid the hair/lint? You would still end up with hiar/lint, except now they are on the side of the shirt thats in contact with your skin.

Marnie
14-03-2011, 07:59 PM
A couple of reasons for that, Question. One is that the exposed side of the fabric rubs against other clothes, which can make a light layer of fuzz causing loss of colour. Another is that often a small amount of lint or fluff may attach itself to the garment and if it's not horribly noticeable you could wear it without it being visible to anyone else. This is obviously not what has happened in your case.
Inside out to dry is self explanatory, it's to avoid fading.

Question
14-03-2011, 08:01 PM
Side note : Are socks safe to wash with clothes?

Marnie
14-03-2011, 08:06 PM
I wash dark socks with dark clothes..but I still put them in one of those mesh laundry bags. It protects both the socks and the rest of the laundry. The bags can be bought fairly cheaply.
I do the same for the light coloured ones, except never in with a dark wash.

Poppa John
14-03-2011, 08:29 PM
I used a machine that didnt have a filter from what i could see.

How would turning the shirt inside out help avoid the hair/lint? You would still end up with hiar/lint, except now they are on the side of the shirt thats in contact with your skin.


Is this how 'Religious Hair Shirts' came about? PJ :rolleyes:

R2x1
14-03-2011, 09:08 PM
No, the hair shirts were a shipment of rabbit shirts that got confused a bit in the specifications due to txt speak.

Tasha
14-03-2011, 09:11 PM
And you can put your bras and knickers in those little bags too... *wink*

bellbird
14-03-2011, 09:26 PM
Yeah, dark clothes will show the sludge and fluff from the washing detergent and particularly from new towels.

I use a lint roller rather than splitting the wash into smaller loads.
Rewashing seldom gets rid of all the bits.

Using a liquid laundry detergent , and avoiding excessive suds may help reduce the mess, but won't eliminate it totally.

Put some white vinegar in the rinse, it removes the sludge and some of the fluff. No, your clothes won't smell of vinegar after they're dry. A double rinse helps too.

Marnie
14-03-2011, 09:54 PM
Good idea, bellbird, I should have mentioned that. I buy my white vinegar in large containers for that purpose.

Winston001
14-03-2011, 10:48 PM
For much of my life, my clothes turned up in the superheater cupboard or in my drawers. Lint free. However recently I was introduced to a previously unknown space in the home called a laundry. That's where Mum and later, my wife kept disappearing to...

I too then discovered the mysteries of mixing fabrics. Which still defeat me. :D My solution is a vacuum cleaner brush with two velcro strips which seems to grip and eat the otherwise impossible fluff.

Mind you, having a white cat probably doesn't help but he's useless at washing anyway. :lol:

Snorkbox
14-03-2011, 11:15 PM
I suspect that the OP went to a Laundromat hence the lack of not checking for filters or not knowing which I could understand.

My cat, Winston001, possibly washes over her ears more than I do so she understands washing.

No lint on her!

Marnie
15-03-2011, 09:12 AM
For much of my life, my clothes turned up in the superheater cupboard or in my drawers. Lint free. However recently I was introduced to a previously unknown space in the home called a laundry. That's where Mum and later, my wife kept disappearing to...

I too then discovered the mysteries of mixing fabrics. Which still defeat me. :D My solution is a vacuum cleaner brush with two velcro strips which seems to grip and eat the otherwise impossible fluff.

Mind you, having a white cat probably doesn't help but he's useless at washing anyway. :lol:

We once decided a lounge suite colour on the grounds that we owned a beautiful silver tabby. Correction, a silver tabby owned us!!

Snorkbox
15-03-2011, 09:16 AM
We once decided a lounge suite colour on the grounds that we owned a beautiful silver tabby. Correction, a silver tabby owned us!!

When, if, I get reincarnated I want to come back as a cat and adopt a nice rich family. :)

John H
15-03-2011, 04:24 PM
Reported the new ****** in our midst.

Poppa John
15-03-2011, 05:44 PM
When, if, I get reincarnated I want to come back as a cat and adopt a nice rich family. :)

I would settle for being the firstborn SON in a rich family!!! PJ:cool:

SurferJoe46
15-03-2011, 06:48 PM
Youse guys gotta stop laundering youse sheep in da machines.

SurferJoe46
15-03-2011, 06:53 PM
I think Poppa John is the only one in this thread that has suggested you check to see if your wmachine has a filter, and see if it is blocked.

x2 for that suggestion. Our old machine had a filter that had a wee fabric bag that collected all the lint, cat hair etc. If it was full, all of that rubbish bypassed the filter and ended up evenly distributed throughout the wash.

I strongly recommend that you check for the filter, and then if you have one, empty it out. It may be the end of your troubles.

I'm indeed very sorry to hear that your drinking water is full of hair and lint.

If it were me I'd drink the washing machine's discharge because I feel once the water is run through your dirty clothes and towels, etc, it will be less hairy and more easily drinkable.

Question
15-03-2011, 11:00 PM
To clarify, i specifically used a machine that didnt have a filter listed. There were some machines that had instructions to clean the lint filter before use, but im not sure how to do that exactly.

And its $2 per wash so i cant just keep throwing it back in the machine to wash/dry/etc.

So using mixing vinegar before the wash would remove the hair/lint? How does that work?

John H
16-03-2011, 09:12 AM
I'm indeed very sorry to hear that your drinking water is full of hair and lint.

If it were me I'd drink the washing machine's discharge because I feel once the water is run through your dirty clothes and towels, etc, it will be less hairy and more easily drinkable.

Methinks you are being more than usually obtuse SJ. The filter operates on the water circulating in the machine, not what is coming into it from the mains supply...

SurferJoe46
16-03-2011, 03:33 PM
I have never seen nor heard of - until now - ANY washing machine having any filters anywhere in the recirculation system.

Why would youse guys cause yer'selfs such grief and have them installed in youse guys machines?

Just something else to screw up.

Gobe1
16-03-2011, 03:35 PM
Washing machines have filters? why? the water is thrown out at the end of each wash?

John H
16-03-2011, 04:20 PM
I have never seen nor heard of - until now - ANY washing machine having any filters anywhere in the recirculation system.

Why would youse guys cause yer'selfs such grief and have them installed in youse guys machines?

Just something else to screw up.

Our wmachine that we have just got rid of after 15 years use was a Hoover. I thought it was made in Amerika?

Our new machine is an Asko made in Sweden. It has a drainage trap and filter upstream of the drainage pump to filter out objects like coins, hairpins etc to stop them damaging the pump.

For goodness sake Joe, even the bloody hoses have filters in them to stop foreign bodies getting into the wmachine.

I know the Asko and hose filters aren't there to stop lint and cat hair, but that is what the filter was for in the Hoover.

John H
16-03-2011, 04:22 PM
Washing machines have filters? why? the water is thrown out at the end of each wash?

That is not what the filters are there for. The filter in our old machine was to stop the problem complained about by the original poster. The filters in our new machine are to protect the pump from stuff that idiots leave in their clothes such as coins, hairpins etc.

SurferJoe46
16-03-2011, 05:09 PM
We have 'traps' not filters. for foreign objects in the machine.

Hairpins, safety pins, paper clips and staples all wind up in a small serviceable trap that keeps them out of the impellers of the discharge pump.

Circulatory pumps don't exist in modern (I daresay: US- ) washing machines any more.

The old Norge and Hotpoint units had a small basket on the agitator where the circulation pump sent the water back to the drum, and it had a semi-screen device to trap buttons and coins, but they never did.

It was a gimmick that soon disappeared from their- and any other- machines that might've considered them as a marketing ploy.

And - YES - we have water inlet screens to keep rust and small debris out of the solenoid-operated water valves, otherwise they'd leak all the time and possibly flood a house.

John H
16-03-2011, 05:22 PM
The Asko manual may be using the words filter and trap interchangeably. I haven't been in there yet to see if there is a filter as well - certainly the manual says there is a filter in there.

And whilst you may say that the small basket in the agitator didn't work, the Hoover version sure filled up quickly from any lint or hair that came in with the clothes - I had to clear it regularly or the contents would get spread through the wash. I never found any heavy objects like coins in there - they rattled around in the bowl.

SurferJoe46
16-03-2011, 05:41 PM
I never found any heavy objects like coins in there - they rattled around in the bowl.

That's where I get my beer money.

Bobh
16-03-2011, 06:55 PM
That's where I get my beer money.
There was a time when we could pay for our beer in coins. At least it is clean money after it goes through the washing machine.

I got the Magnamail catalogue that comes with the Grey Power magazine today. They are advertising lint grabbing lint balls for $10.90 on page 23NZ. Anybody tried them and if so did they work for you.

SurferJoe46
17-03-2011, 06:23 PM
We have those silly balls advertised here as clothing softeners to use without 'nasty chemicals in the wash water'.

Seems they do everything but what they say they do.

Perhaps for Cricket as an unbattable ball? ?

Question
20-03-2011, 11:19 AM
Hmm, how much vinegar would you guys suggest using?

Bobh
20-03-2011, 12:57 PM
We have those silly balls advertised here as clothing softeners to use without 'nasty chemicals in the wash water'.

Seems they do everything but what they say they do.

Perhaps for Cricket as an unbattable ball? ?

Thank's SurferJoe I will keep my $11.90 in the bank.

Question
21-03-2011, 01:00 PM
Btw any recommendation on how much vinegar i should pour into the washing machine?

Snorkbox
21-03-2011, 02:15 PM
Have a look here:-

http://www.google.co.nz/search?q=Vinegar+in+washing+machine#sclient=psy&hl=en&source=hp&q=Vinegar+in+washing+machine&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=Vinegar+in+washing+machine&pbx=1&fp=b7a1e6eca7543c93

Then make up your own mind.

Question
22-03-2011, 06:57 AM
Oh well, most of those links recommend cleaning the washing machine with vinegar by running it without clothes, something i cant do.

Gobe1
22-03-2011, 08:31 AM
Pour a gallon in your washing machine, seriously?

Marnie
22-03-2011, 09:44 AM
I can just tell you what I do, Question.

1. If I am using soap powder I make sure it has dissolved before I add clothes, some powders, particularly when used in cold water washes, may leave little white flecks of soap powder on your clothing.

2. I prefer to use liquid laundry detergent when washing dark clothing, I just pour the recommended amount, usually a capful, onto the clothes and set the machine to start. If you have a grease mark or stain on your clothes, rub a little of the detergent onto that before you put it into the machine.

3. I have white vinegar that I have transferred into an old, well washed palmolive dish washing liquid bottle. When it gets to the final rinse cycle I just give it a couple of squirts straight into the machine, usually as it is still filling. You don't have to go to that extent, it's just more convenient for me. The amount of vinegar would probably only be around 15-20 mls.

Snorkbox
22-03-2011, 09:50 AM
Oh well, most of those links recommend cleaning the washing machine with vinegar by running it without clothes, something i cant do.

A number of those same links recommend adding a cup of vinegar to the wash in order to soften clothing and help with lint.

I can say that I don't add vinegar to my wash and have no problems with lint.

Question
06-04-2011, 02:59 PM
I can just tell you what I do, Question.

1. If I am using soap powder I make sure it has dissolved before I add clothes, some powders, particularly when used in cold water washes, may leave little white flecks of soap powder on your clothing.

2. I prefer to use liquid laundry detergent when washing dark clothing, I just pour the recommended amount, usually a capful, onto the clothes and set the machine to start. If you have a grease mark or stain on your clothes, rub a little of the detergent onto that before you put it into the machine.

3. I have white vinegar that I have transferred into an old, well washed palmolive dish washing liquid bottle. When it gets to the final rinse cycle I just give it a couple of squirts straight into the machine, usually as it is still filling. You don't have to go to that extent, it's just more convenient for me. The amount of vinegar would probably only be around 15-20 mls.

How do you dissolve the powder? Do you simply pour in the powder, then pour in some water before putting in the clothes?

R2x1
06-04-2011, 04:26 PM
You can considerably cut down the hair on your shirts by washing the dog separately, after the clothes have been safely started on their drying cycle.

Question
10-04-2011, 01:32 PM
Theres no dog.

SurferJoe46
10-04-2011, 02:37 PM
cat

hairy flat mate

carpets in the laundry