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Nomad
27-01-2011, 12:24 PM
I am going to provide a different perspective the job search posts here ..

Having worked for a no. of years and getting a a decent salary, I thought I take a career change into IT.

I find the process of writing a CV and covering letter no different but the issue for me is that all the jobs are pretty much Helpdesk, I am in Wellington. The selection of jobs are so narrow compared to say a office job where you can branch around and relatively doable to branch back into the field one wants this is not so with IT. There are also much lesser recruitment agencies that deal with IT roles.

It's not like one could just go temping and still jump back into a IT role using that gathered experience.

Not sure if I made the wrong choice :D
Thou Software Development like SQL, programming are much easier cos you can work with array of different jobs in offices or even be an administrator with a project or data warehouse, finance, data analysis, statistics etc etc.. or with a project team.

Mine is more in the IT hardware side.



Regards.

Snorkbox
27-01-2011, 01:20 PM
I'm really not sure what your point is here.

Are you asking if you made the wrong choice or are you trying to give advice or are you looking for another job?

Or what? I, for one, find the post rather confusing.

SolMiester
27-01-2011, 01:26 PM
Not sure what you are saying here, however IMO, hardware support is pretty much a neesh field as are many IT fields nowadays....Helpdesk is really just a sort office for the back office boys...

Nomad
27-01-2011, 01:48 PM
Just saying that IT roles are harder to get into.

It's not like medicine that you do very relevent study and be a Doctor (and you're in demand) and it's not v general that you can just do office temping and hope to get some skills to land you a IT job.

I find that the software guys are a bit easier more jobs to get into etc... you could just start off as an administrator for a finance team, pick up some knowledge and you might end up improving reporting processes for eg.

Helpdesk level 1 I think is more frontline customer service (first point of contact), back office might be level 3 is it? I was told level 2 is a mixture of the both.

Not sure if IT jobs sound so great now ... maybe going back to my previous type of role is one of the options I may consider ...

pctek
27-01-2011, 02:03 PM
The selection of jobs are so narrow

There are also much lesser recruitment agencies that deal with IT roles.





Really???

http://jobs.geekzone.co.nz/Jobs

http://www.seek.co.nz/JobSearch?DateRange=31&industry=6281&SearchFrom=quick

And there are loads and loads of Agencies that do IT.

Nomad
27-01-2011, 02:19 PM
Really???

http://jobs.geekzone.co.nz/Jobs

http://www.seek.co.nz/JobSearch?DateRange=31&industry=6281&SearchFrom=quick

And there are loads and loads of Agencies that do IT.

I am in Wellington, if I filter it down to Helpdesk and IT Support I get 2 pages of all jobs, 95% are Helpdesk, very few agencies compared to the more general jobs. Like for us there is just Intergen, Candle, Absolute IT, Hays ... I also noticed that some adverts specifically ask agencies not to refer clients, something that didn't occur to me when I was outside the IT field.

http://www.seek.co.nz/JobSearch?DateRange=31&location=1019&industry=6281&occupation=6291&SearchFrom=quick

Other than maybe "Helpdesk and IT Support" is probably out of my skillset. It's not like I can use my office administration skills to apply for a IT role :
The more general jobs might be able to access, receptionist, administrator, co-ordinator, PA, assistant, intern or entry analyst .. .. and then after a while you may get a more indepth job.

Snorkbox
27-01-2011, 02:40 PM
One thing I do know about job applications Nomad.

If you don't know where you are going then it's going to be very difficult to get there!!!

Nomad
27-01-2011, 03:36 PM
One thing I do know about job applications Nomad.

If you don't know where you are going then it's going to be very difficult to get there!!!

For IT roles at the beginning there are v few avenues generally speaking. Helpdesk or Application Support but Helpdesk takes up like 95% of the jobs. If one wants to be get a hardware job, entry level hardware jobs are actually very few, likewise Application Support.

For other roles, if a person is a accountant or just got a arts degree, they cannot get the foot in the door, they could do call centre work, get a bit of office experience and work experience, then maybe do some non telephone work like a administrator and they could use those skills to get them into a actual financial or other role they have in mind.

pctek
27-01-2011, 04:23 PM
if I filter it down to Helpdesk and IT Support I get 2 pages of all jobs, 95% are Helpdesk,


Funny that.

somebody
27-01-2011, 07:06 PM
When you say "IT hardware side", what do you mean by that? It could vary anywhere from assembling/repairing PCs like a number of PressF1 members do, through to designing enterprise hardware platforms. If you can give us a better indication of what you want to do, and what sort of experience you have, someone here might be able to help you out.

There are definitely jobs out there in the IT industry. Just today I had an email from a friend asking if I knew any good people (for non-helpdesk roles) as their company has a lot of work in the pipeline and need to urgently hire more staff. The company I work for is currently looking for people (at the senior end of the spectrum though). Both of these companies are in Wellington.

Telecom are looking at in-sourcing and on-shoring: http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/4572307/Telecom-looks-for-300-IT-staff

There will be "stuff" happening in the public sector space as part of the all-of-govt IT initiatives: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/technology/news/article.cfm?c_id=5&objectid=10700115

Don't take this offensively, but there are a lot of "IT" people who simply aren't very good, or have entered the industry for all the wrong reasons. In a lot of the fields you've described - like medicine for example - the qualification and training which goes with it does a good job of ensuring only the best people get through. Unfortunately there are a lot of people with IT degrees who have no interest in the field other than having the impression that it pays well, who have either scraped through their qualifications and barely passed, or don't have the life, business, or people skills to make people want to hire them. There are people whose brains simply aren't wired with a technical mindset, who would do a great job in other industries - and yet they insist on trying to get a job in IT.

I have no idea if you would fit into any of the categories I described above so don't take those comments personally - they are intended as broad, general statements.

Nomad
27-01-2011, 07:59 PM
When you say "IT hardware side", what do you mean by that? It could vary anywhere from assembling/repairing PCs like a number of PressF1 members do, through to designing enterprise hardware platforms. If you can give us a better indication of what you want to do, and what sort of experience you have, someone here might be able to help you out.



I mean as a graduate with a Diploma, A+, Network+, MCP; that's more the hardware side. As a graduate, enterprise equipment might be too advanced for them. So probably more desktop PCs or in an organisation that are networked. Yes, like fixing and setting up office workstations.

School has the careers person. That can always be helpful.

I've had a look on SEEK, under the hardware category, pretty much asking for engineering experience. Under the maybe more appropriate category "Helpdesk and IT Support", pretty much all of it was Helpdesk.

The guys I know who graduated and got jobs all work in Helpdesk. Those that have CCNA, or a desktop tech or a lesser (level 4) client support diploma. Some of them went to uni and then went to a technical school, some just went to directly to the technical school.

Obviously there are guys who are already working in IT and just come in the evenings to get the certs. But they are on a different boat than us.

I am the type that just cannot do telephone work. I'm also in my 30s. I come from a financial background, never worked in IT before.

somebody
27-01-2011, 08:33 PM
I mean as a graduate with a Diploma, A+, Network+, MCP; that's more the hardware side. As a graduate, enterprise equipment might be too advanced for them. So probably more desktop PCs or in an organisation that are networked. Yes, like fixing and setting up office workstations.

School has the careers person. That can always be helpful.

I've had a look on SEEK, under the hardware category, pretty much asking for engineering experience. Under the maybe more appropriate category "Helpdesk and IT Support", pretty much all of it was Helpdesk.

The guys I know who graduated and got jobs all work in Helpdesk. Those that have CCNA, or a desktop tech or a lesser (level 4) client support diploma. Some of them went to uni and then went to a technical school, some just went to directly to the technical school.

Obviously there are guys who are already working in IT and just come in the evenings to get the certs. But they are on a different boat than us.

I am the type that just cannot do telephone work. I'm also in my 30s. I come from a financial background, never worked in IT before.

Hmm... ok - I'll let you know if I hear of anything, but it sounds like the sort of stuff you want to do is sort of like the next step up from helpdesk - i.e. people who the helpdesk staff will get to visit a user and fix their computer. I know a couple of people in those sort of roles (I think their official title is "Support Technician" or something to that effect) who spend their days going around fixing PCs which the helpdesk can't do remotely. They both started on the helpdesk answering phones and moved up once they got more experience.

Nomad
27-01-2011, 08:47 PM
:thanks


That's the issue I might be facing. I knew I was going to take a hit on the salary drop but didn't thought so many entry roles are telephone based. Many jobs you could avoid that.

pctek
28-01-2011, 08:05 AM
That's the issue I might be facing.

Is that your point? You're new to IT but you want a better role straight off? Like Desktop Support?
Hell I have enough trouble getting that sort of thing.

Too many IT people, they want experienced and/or specialists.

General support people are a dime a dozen.

Nomad
28-01-2011, 09:24 AM
Is that your point? You're new to IT but you want a better role straight off? Like Desktop Support?
Hell I have enough trouble getting that sort of thing.

Too many IT people, they want experienced and/or specialists.

General support people are a dime a dozen.

At the time I thought it might of been similar to other jobs to a lesser extent. That there are jobs away from phones even at the entry level. I don't even mind doing office admin as long as it's IT related ...

One of the things I may consider is get into IT Audit instead using my b/ground and now the IT skills I have gathered (at school at least). I do enjoy numbers with spreadsheets and databases. Thou I have meet those who hated software and just want to get into hardware, one even booked a flight to Melbourne later in the year when he expects to finish his course.

I know a few people who might in their 50s (not me yet) who might be graduating soon. That can be difficult for them to do telephone support.

forums12345
28-01-2011, 10:09 AM
you can always volunteer for i.t experience :)

Nomad
28-01-2011, 10:20 AM
I know a few doing that but they are the younger lot, they been with a firm for job experience as part of the course, but they remained on unpaid for 3 months counting ... Fulltime.

For me thou, I arn't in my 20s .. cannot live like this forever.
Maybe I shoulda did software, that would be more relevant getting back into a desk job. Data mining or Data Intelligence; whatever its called.

So many helpdesk roles for IT. Other jobs yo get administrator, assistants, PAs, receptionists, or just go temping on a week by week basis as you are required by the employer .....

forums12345
28-01-2011, 10:22 AM
IT is all about who you know rather than what you know sadly:( I have being looking for very long time I get interviews but thats it!

Bozo
28-01-2011, 11:11 AM
IT is all about who you know rather than what you know sadly:( I have being looking for very long time I get interviews but thats it!

Yes and no.

It takes a lot to stand out from the masses and being able to present your CV and cover letter in a way that stands out and makes your potential employers want to hire you is all part of the deal too. I learned that from getting my current job, and looking back on my original CVs, its no wonder I didn't get any jobs prior to getting a lot of help in that aspect :yuck:

somebody
28-01-2011, 06:52 PM
IT is all about who you know rather than what you know sadly:( I have being looking for very long time I get interviews but thats it!

Although "who you know" plays a role, I don't think it's significantly different to any other industry - at least not in my experience. In any industry, sometimes having "contacts" in the right places can be extremely helpful to get a job. Being the "right" candidate is what will ultimately get you the job - what counts as "right" can include factors all the way from technical expertise through to people skills, attitude, and personality.

The last two jobs I've gotten are with companies I knew very little about. In fact, I wasn't even aware the company I'm working for now existed before I applied for the job.

plod
28-01-2011, 06:58 PM
Have you looked at place like fujixerox, canon, those sort of places. Lots of hardware support needed there, networking, usually on the road at clients. Good coin and company car to boot. To be fair you would probably start in the workshop

Nomad
28-01-2011, 07:23 PM
Well hoping so with .. workshop.

Telephone work just doesn't fit with my psychology type.
When I worked in CSR for 3 months I couldn't wait to get out. It was like the work was so repetitive sometimes I had a habit of saying the same thing but it was wrong.

Someone is keeping an eye out but she did admit at the mo there are more helpdesk jobs out there for grads.

Just out of interests. Those of you who work in IT. How often are you studying part time getting your other skills and your other certs? Are you like engagede 2/3 of the year like that or ....

somebody
28-01-2011, 08:34 PM
We have a company mandated minimum number of hours we must spend doing professional development each year - it is one of the KPIs we must meet during our performance reviews. All of us are constantly learning on the job (there's always something new to learn, even for the most senior employees), plus there are opportunities to attend workshops/training courses, sit exams/certifications etc. If a certification or exam is relevant to what the company does, then they will pay for the cost of the exam and allow us to sit it during work hours.

forums12345
28-01-2011, 09:41 PM
there is a huge difference between csr and helpdesk. Both r help desk but different helpdeskk is when you provide tech support over da phone for internal users regarding technology like ms etc, csr is when u provide tech support to customers regarding when their internet is broken.

:pf1mobmini:

Nomad
28-01-2011, 10:25 PM
Nah .. Cannot do telephone. It's a talking robot. I just cannot sit there and talk. Personality tests show it, telephone and me just don't match.

Funny that, IT that for many the norm is helpdesk. Sounds like a cadet program.

One fella booked a one way ticket to Melb cos he hates helpdesk. I just said that IT is IT, whereas some other jobs you may have more feedback to the company's direction. IT's just Mr Fix it or implement or maintain it. So he said IT is the janitor :D

:pf1mobmini: