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Nomad
19-01-2011, 05:22 PM
I am just wondering if you are away from home within NZ or abroad, how do you access the net?

Also, do any of you know if the Nokia GPS subsciption fee is for all maps or is that for each of the maps? I happen to have a Nokia handset that does not come with free maps.

Are the iPhones free maps and what about the Garmin cellphone, I guess as Garmin goes each map is payable right :confused: Does the Garmin cellphone have a true GPS or is it just a-GPS?



:thanks:

Cicero
19-01-2011, 05:27 PM
I am just wondering if you are away from home within NZ or abroad, how do you access the net?

Also, do any of you know if the Nokia GPS subsciption fee is for all maps or is that for each of the maps? I happen to have a Nokia handset that does not come with free maps.

Are the iPhones free maps and what about the Garmin cellphone, I guess as Garmin goes each map is payable right :confused: Does the Garmin cellphone have a true GPS or is it just a-GPS?



:thanks:

In my case, the hotel provides Wi Fi.

Nomad
19-01-2011, 05:35 PM
Thanks.

For the others fyi. The Garmin Nuvifone seems to be a dedicated GPS cellphone but the maps are $100US, at least for one I checked out. :lol: A shame for the tourist use. Seems like real GPS devices are to be used in original country.

Erayd
19-01-2011, 06:39 PM
I am just wondering if you are away from home within NZ or abroad, how do you access the net?Usually via my phone (Nexus One).


Are the iPhones free maps...This depends which application you're using. Google Maps is one of the free options, but requires a network connection.


...Does the Garmin cellphone have a true GPS or is it just a-GPS?I'm not sure why this misconception persists, but for some reason people have gotten the idea that AGPS is somehow inferior to 'real' GPS. In most cases, this simply isn't true - AGPS generally refers to a full, standalone GPS unit with a few optional extra bells and whistles that can help improve speed and / or accuracy.

The only situation where AGPS is inferior is where the phone in question is an older model of 'dumbphone' that lacks the necessary system resources to support a full GPS implementation. In this scenario, the GPS unit is effectively split in two, with the phone containing not much more than a GPS radio, and most of the processing is done on a remote server.

All phones sold these days have the necessary system resources to implement a full GPS system locally, and most do. The 'assisted' bit refers to the optional network provision of almanac data, precise time, approximate location fixes, assistance with coordinating fragmented signals, information on local conditions that may affect the GPS signal, etc. None of this assistance is required (although in some cases it can reduce the time required for an initial fix, or improve the accuracy), and the device will quite happily get a GPS fix without the need for any of it.

Nomad
19-01-2011, 06:59 PM
Yeah .. on my phone a Nokia E75 it takes a couple of mins to get a fix on my location from cold.

Does the iPhone have maps that you can download and it does not continously use data (like Google Maps does)? Is there a naviggation guidance subscription? Going travel in NZ or abroad I don't wanna get a data plan or roaming data plan .....

Chilling_Silence
19-01-2011, 09:36 PM
If you get something like the Nexus One, then you can use Google Maps which has recently officially begun to support offline cachine of maps etc.

The standard iPhone version doesn't and requires a constant data connection, though for both Android and iPhone you can get 3rd party apps from their respective Marketplaces, paid of course ... Hence once of the many reasons why I'm going to recommend: Android! ;)

Erayd
19-01-2011, 10:18 PM
Not quite what he's after though Chill, Google Maps / Nav still needs a data connection for searching destinations, figuring out routes etc. Judging by what Nomad says, he won't have *any* mobile data connection at all, so one of the third party apps would be a more appropriate choice here.

Nomad - both platforms do have third party apps that don't require adata connection at all, but I'm not sure what the quality is like, as I've never tried them - Google's navigation apps have always filled my needs perfectly.

:pf1mobmini:

Nomad
19-01-2011, 10:53 PM
So not even Android allow one to download the maps and buy any navigation licenses and to use it without *any* mobile data plan?

I guess the 3rd party ones would be more pricey and if and how they charge different map regions.

May just stick to the Nokia :D I'll just buy a $5.99 30 day navigation subscription and the ~$12 for life of the particular cellphone for "City Explorer".

Nomad
19-01-2011, 11:33 PM
Nomad - both platforms do have third party apps that don't require adata connection at all, but I'm not sure what the quality is like, as I've never tried them - Google's navigation apps have always filled my needs perfectly.

:pf1mobmini:

Correct me if I am wrong but after a bit of research, it does appear the Androids might not have offline maps from factory.

There is a NZ GPS group which makes them available for free, I have them on my Garmin 60CSx which is pretty good but not that professionally colourful.

My concern is that quality free third party apps are prob v limited (if one wants for them for a lot of countries). OTOH one could buy them off Garmin or TomTom doubt it would be cheap thou. Maybe Nokia's offline maps not too bad now, they have many maps available too. The $5.99 30 day subscription. I love a iPhone or Android, v trendy phones as they are but lacks in oveseas GPS travel.

Erayd
19-01-2011, 11:33 PM
So not even Android allow one to download the maps and buy any navigation licenses and to use it without *any* mobile data plan?I think perhaps I was a bit unclear with my previous post. Yes, you can do this just fine with an Android phone, and there are apps available that will work completely offline. What I was saying is that Google Maps / Nav is not one of those apps.

Android itself has nothing to do with whether you can navigate without a data connection; it's just a platform on which navigation apps can run. The need (or not) for a data connection depends entirely on the app in question.

:pf1mobmini:

Nomad
19-01-2011, 11:38 PM
:thanks:

But yeah .. quality 3rd party apps are prob gonna cost more than Nokia's free program to many users or else some of the non free handsets - $5.99 month or $29.99 (?) for the year.

For those interested a quality NZ has one for free. I use it for my trekking Garmin and it's pretty good but doubt many other countries are as fortunate.
http://gwprojects.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=1703

I've tried searching free maps for the Garmin, they're pretty much barely done. Some are just maps with no POIs. Some others only have the main st and no POIs. So you cannot even do a search.

plod
19-01-2011, 11:41 PM
Not quite what he's after though Chill, Google Maps / Nav still needs a data connection for searching destinations, figuring out routes etc. Judging by what Nomad says, he won't have *any* mobile data connection at all, so one of the third party apps would be a more appropriate choice here.

Nomad - both platforms do have third party apps that don't require adata connection at all, but I'm not sure what the quality is like, as I've never tried them - Google's navigation apps have always filled my needs perfectly.

:pf1mobmini:
Boss at work has the navman app for his iphone. Seems to work a treat. He didn't get the cradle I don't think. Well its never in the car. Gps works fine on that. Not sure if its using data or not

Erayd
19-01-2011, 11:50 PM
Correct me if I am wrong but after a bit of research, the Androids might not have offline maps from factory.In most cases, Android phones come with Google Maps preinstalled, and Google Maps does not support fully offline operation. There is nothing stopping you from installing another app however; you are *not* restricted to using only the apps that come with the phone.


There is a NZ GPS group which makes them available for free, I have them on my Garmin 60CSx which is pretty good but not that professionally colourful.If this is the map set I'm thinking of, it should be available for use in Android mapping applications too.


My concern is that quality free third party apps are prob v limited (if one wants for them for a lot of countries). OTOH one could buy them off Garmin or TomTom doubt it would be cheap thou.I simply don't know what's available for free - have you looked? There are an awful lot of apps in the market; it's extremely likely that there will be one available that does what you want. I've heard a few friends recommend CoPilot - it sells for NZ $66.71 (includes Australia & NZ maps), and does exactly what you're asking for.


I love a iPhone or Android, v trendy phones as they are but lacks in oveseas GPS travel.Please correct me if I'm wrong, but it sounds to me as if you don't quite understand the concept of apps. Android & iOS are operating systems - complaining that Android doesn't support offline maps is like complaining that Windows XP can't edit PowerPoint files. If you want to edit PowerPoint files, you install MS Office (or similar) - the same principle applies here.

:pf1mobmini:

Nomad
20-01-2011, 09:58 AM
I simply don't know what's available for free - have you looked? There are an awful lot of apps in the market; it's extremely likely that there will be one available that does what you want. I've heard a few friends recommend CoPilot - it sells for NZ $66.71 (includes Australia & NZ maps), and does exactly what you're asking for.

:pf1mobmini:

I haven't looked at what's free for the Androids or iPhones.
My guess would be that quality free maps might be difficult to get if one wants 20+ countries. I have a travel bug. Garmin has been around for a much longer time and it's poor. You could buy the official $$ Garmin maps.

Options like the CoPilot is an option but it gets expensive if one needs it to go overseas. Ie., if a person needs to buy a few maps every year.




Please correct me if I'm wrong, but it sounds to me as if you don't quite understand the concept of apps. Android & iOS are operating systems - complaining that Android doesn't support offline maps is like complaining that Windows XP can't edit PowerPoint files. If you want to edit PowerPoint files, you install MS Office (or similar) - the same principle applies here.

:pf1mobmini:


Some of the "older" MS portable units supported offline usage but I guess the market might have shifted. Well there are Garmin trekking units .....

I am looking at the end user's perspective. They might be ok in the home country where data plans might be affordable but who can afford a international roaming data plan. One could pick up a simcard but then again one might just be in a country for a few days.

Nokia has operating systems too and afaik they might work fully in offline.

merien
28-01-2011, 11:42 PM
iphone (has it all)

gary67
29-01-2011, 08:26 AM
iphone (has it all)

Why are you pushing the Ipoo so much do you work for Crapple?

Jen
29-01-2011, 08:43 AM
Why are you pushing the Ipoo so much do you work for Crapple?The user "merien" was just trying to make 10 posts so they could add their advertisements/spam to their signature. He/she is no longer with us. ;)

gary67
29-01-2011, 09:20 AM
I thought so which is why I reported it