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Mike
07-01-2011, 11:30 AM
The fan in my PSU has seized. PSU still works (computer gets power fine) but the fan no longer turns around, so the PSU gets REAL hot :)

I have switched out that PSU for one with a working fan, but I would like to get the fan working again if possible. Is there a way to unseize a fan in a PSU? The fan power is soldered into the fan so I can't switch it out easily for another fan...

Any suggestions? Seems a waste of a good PSU when just the fan doesn't work?

Cheers,
Mike.

linw
07-01-2011, 11:41 AM
You can see how much longer it will run by applying a small amount of light oil to the bearing but it is likely that the bearing is stuffed. Peel back the foil on the centre to get at the bearing. Also clean all dirt/fluff off it.

Easy enough to cut wires and solder new one on if you have a soldering iron and can find a good fan.

Good luck.

Myth
07-01-2011, 11:43 AM
Depends.. what brand PSU is it?

pctek
07-01-2011, 12:07 PM
Replace the fan.

Myth
07-01-2011, 12:23 PM
Replace the fan... even if it an unreliable brand of PSU?

pctek
07-01-2011, 12:29 PM
.. even if it an unreliable brand of PSU?

No. but that isn't what he asked........BTW your GF didn't ring?

Myth
07-01-2011, 12:45 PM
No. but that isn't what he asked........BTW your GF didn't ring?OK

And yeah, she left a message this morning. Will ring you later :) </hijack>

Paul.Cov
07-01-2011, 06:19 PM
The super nasty way to do this is to bolt another fan to the outside of the computer, over where the PSU fan normally vents.
If doing this it may be best to cut the power to the seized fan and to remove it, or break off the fans fins so that it's not obstructing the air flow.

Super nasty, but effective.

PENTIUM
07-01-2011, 06:33 PM
Putting a fan on the outside is hard on the fingers and the fan if you forget it is there!
It is quite possible to take the old fan out and fit a replacement.
Make sure the 400volt rail is discharged before you stick your fingers inside.

Agent_24
07-01-2011, 07:04 PM
I have replaced PSU fans several times, It's very very easy.

Just need a new fan (standard 80mm or 120mm or maybe even 90mm computer fan depending on what your PSU is like) and a soldering iron

If you don't have a soldering iron find someone who does. They should be able to replace the fan in 5 minutes, [thats how long it would take me.]

If it would take them half an hour or more then they don't know what they're doing.

pctek
07-01-2011, 07:19 PM
I have replaced PSU fans several times, It's very very easy.
.

Yep.
Should be a go unless it's a Hyena or something, in which case bin it.

Mike
07-01-2011, 07:23 PM
Yep.
Should be a go unless it's a Hyena or something, in which case bin it.what crazy advice. If a PSU (even a Hyena or whatever) still supplies power, and its only a cheap fan that's the problem, why bin it and pay who knows how much for a whole new PSU?

Anyway, I've pulled the fan apart and cleaned its insides, now it spins when I blow on it (before that I couldn't even get my vacuum cleaner to spin it... I could get it to move slightly with my finger)... so hopefully it works again now :)

Any way to start up a PSU without attaching it to a Mobo?

Mike.

icow
07-01-2011, 07:42 PM
http://www.gideontech.com/content/articles/196/1

Agent_24
07-01-2011, 07:49 PM
what crazy advice. If a PSU (even a Hyena or whatever) still supplies power, and its only a cheap fan that's the problem, why bin it

Because Hyena are cheap and nasty. Cheap PSUs are not cool.

Hyenas here in NZ are actually built not incredibly badly, but they are let down with useless capacitors which die quickly.

If your model is one of the decent ones with the full input filter etc then it might be worth capacitor replacement.


But cheap PSUs in general are not a good idea. Most are missing input filters which makes them susceptible to power disturbances.

Cheap capacitors make the working life short, and when the output capacitors fail the PSUs ripple suppression is gone and 'dirty' power starts going into the rest of your PC.

But by far the most compelling reason to not buy and use cheap PSUs is because when overloaded they often don't shut down and instead blow up or catch fire.

They also enjoy doing this for no good reason. NOT something you want to happen if you leave your PC on overnight or whatever.


Here's JonnyGuru's review on a late model Allied aka Deer\Solytech\Hyena and others: http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Story&reid=65

The Error Guy
07-01-2011, 08:00 PM
Basicly, if the CPU is crap, why bother with time to solder and replace parts? a bad PSU could even give a nasty voltage spike damaging MORE equipment and costing more than just replacing it. I have even seen some cheap PSU's arc and catch fire, and even overload/over heat and catch fire.

If you are in wellington I can fix in 3 weeks, I would tomorrow but i fly out then

Agent_24
07-01-2011, 08:20 PM
As Jonnyguru showed, the ripple is actually quite nice (when the capacitors are brand new)

After a year or two, though, that probably wouldn't be the case, so better capacitors are needed.

With decent capacitors it would be fine for a Pentium 3 or something, but efficiency does suck.

Might as well spend the money on a new PSU unless you absolutely can't afford it (because a recap would certainly be cheaper)

Mike
07-01-2011, 08:39 PM
Thanks.

Mike.

Agent_24
07-01-2011, 09:06 PM
Clearly whatever PSU you have is working OK (Hasn't exploded anyway!) so if you're happy with it just fix\replace the fan.

However if when you open it you notice the capacitors are bulging or leaking brown stuff, they are dead and I highly recommend they be replaced.

Even a decent brand of capacitor will be fairly cheap compared to a whole new PSU, if you don't want to\can't pay for one.