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SurferJoe46
29-12-2010, 04:32 AM
I'm NOT posting this on the tech-side, since it might just be a big joke anyway and I cannot bear the scorn of techies and geeks (not that anyone on F1 is either of those) -

anywho --- I am trying to rescue a friend's 'puter that just sits there and strings beads on the XP start-up screen for hours and hours.

OK - I heard that freezing the hdd will possibly get just one more boot.

Truth or lie? :help:

I've tried putting the hdd in a different location, standing it upright, lying down, gently 'tapped' on it during boot-time and even turned off the lights in case it's embarrassed to be seen naked in the light.

OK - to tell the truth, the hdd is sitting in my deep freezer right now and has been there for the past 24 hours.

Don't laugh - because if this is cutting edge, new technology, I'll have a full report as only I can write these sorta things - but even after I took my medications, this still sounds like a neat-o idea.

If it isn't (or wasn't) a good idea, then we can all have a laugh. :blush:

The Error Guy
29-12-2010, 05:29 AM
Apparently a good freeze can do good, just watch out on the thaw, don't let it get wet with condensation. Keep it out of humidity.

pctek
29-12-2010, 06:54 AM
If your hard disk drive dies, freeze it and it will buy you enough time to retrieve its data.



As the myth goes, if your drive dies (for whatever reason) and you cannot access its contents, just chuck it into the freezer for a couple of hours. Once it's nice and cold, quickly hook it up to the PC and it will run for some time, which should allow you to to retrieve some, if not all, of the data in the hard disk drive. The key, apparently, is to do it while the hard disk drive is cold.

As encouraging as it may sound, this is is just a myth. Most hard disk drives can work at freezing temperatures, as low as 0 °C. However, if the hard disk drive is already dead (e.g. because of a head crash or damaged electronics), you cannot revive it even temporarily by freezing it. Unlike ice-cream, hard disk drives really do not need to be frozen.

The fact is that components of a hard drive are manufactured and placed within the structure with precision. Each spindle head is precisely positioned to retrieve data while you type away on your computer. The myth suggests that when these heads get stuck or misplaced, freezing the drive will shrink the components.

The end user then warms the hard drive back to room temperature where they will return to normal size and back in their correct position. While the science behind freezing, shrinking, warming, and expanding is correct, it does not mean it will miraculously fix your hard drive to proper working condition.

Freezing the hard drive can replace heads and components back to their original position, but only for a few minutes while you desperately try to get the data off the hard drive before it permanently stops working.

Freezing the hard drive may fix the mechanical workings, but freezing it also causes irreparable damage to the hard drive’s platters. The freezing causes severe damage to the magnetic portion of your drive, so your data can be lost to that big black hole in space.

Agent_24
29-12-2010, 10:45 AM
It can work sometimes. It made a dying drive slightly more responsive to me ONCE.

dugimodo
29-12-2010, 04:15 PM
I've heard this one too, but my question is this; - just because it hangs on the XP startup screen doesn't mean the drive is faulty.. are you Sure it is ????

pcuser42
29-12-2010, 04:36 PM
I've heard of this trick, however if I tried it and got the drive going again, the first thing I would do is copy critical data to another drive and throw away the dead drive.

Renmoo
29-12-2010, 05:30 PM
If your hard disk drive dies, freeze it and it will buy you enough time to retrieve its data.



As the myth goes, if your drive dies (for whatever reason) and you cannot access its contents, just chuck it into the freezer for a couple of hours. Once it's nice and cold, quickly hook it up to the PC and it will run for some time, which should allow you to to retrieve some, if not all, of the data in the hard disk drive. The key, apparently, is to do it while the hard disk drive is cold.

As encouraging as it may sound, this is is just a myth. Most hard disk drives can work at freezing temperatures, as low as 0 °C. However, if the hard disk drive is already dead (e.g. because of a head crash or damaged electronics), you cannot revive it even temporarily by freezing it. Unlike ice-cream, hard disk drives really do not need to be frozen.

The fact is that components of a hard drive are manufactured and placed within the structure with precision. Each spindle head is precisely positioned to retrieve data while you type away on your computer. The myth suggests that when these heads get stuck or misplaced, freezing the drive will shrink the components.

The end user then warms the hard drive back to room temperature where they will return to normal size and back in their correct position. While the science behind freezing, shrinking, warming, and expanding is correct, it does not mean it will miraculously fix your hard drive to proper working condition.

Freezing the hard drive can replace heads and components back to their original position, but only for a few minutes while you desperately try to get the data off the hard drive before it permanently stops working.

Freezing the hard drive may fix the mechanical workings, but freezing it also causes irreparable damage to the hard drive’s platters. The freezing causes severe damage to the magnetic portion of your drive, so your data can be lost to that big black hole in space.
http://www.recovery-experts.com/data-recovery-myths/freezing-myth.html

The reference

SurferJoe46
29-12-2010, 07:03 PM
I've heard this one too, but my question is this; - just because it hangs on the XP startup screen doesn't mean the drive is faulty.. are you Sure it is ????

I forgot to say that you can hear the drive whine too.

It gets to a mid-octave Bb and sometime can make a full C#, but the beads just keep a'rolling ad nauseum.

I think three days (yup - 72 hours) of bead rolling is a dead giveaway - no?

I got Puppy on a stick and maybe some Ubuntu on a SD to try if I can get the BIOS to talk. Maybe.

Spring will happen to the HD sometime tomorrow - and it is sealed in a freezer bag, double zipped to keep the moisture outta it - so maybe --- maybe.

I bet it's a total loss anyway - but hey - I gotta open new vistas before I die.

feersumendjinn
29-12-2010, 07:17 PM
May have been better to try slaving it in another machine to recover the data, first.

Scouse
29-12-2010, 07:55 PM
Hi Joe...
A nice little US of A story in our local rags...
Help fill in the time until thaw-day.
Good luck with the adventure.
http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/americas/4500295/Man-chews-his-way-to-freedom

Jen
29-12-2010, 08:57 PM
I've tried the freezer trick in an act of desperation, but alas, it did not work. :dogeye:

I would boot up with a Linux Live CD and see if you can view the HDD.

Jen
29-12-2010, 08:59 PM
Oh, and technical question so thread moved to the PressF1 forum ... ;)

wainuitech
29-12-2010, 09:34 PM
I've done the Old freezer trick a few times BUT only since the person didn't want to pay out big $$ to send to a professional recovery business.

This is after trying all other alternatives - Slaving the drive, Linux etc.

Sometimes it works OK and allows you to get data off, BEFORE it thaws out, once that happens its dead. You only do the freezer trick, if you know the drive is stuffed, simply because it will be afterwards, and you can only do it once.

One particular "recovery" -- The person had LOTS of family photo's and loads of music. It was quite funny to see, SWMBO thought I was nuts :waughh: -- HDD in a sealed plastic Bag, with a SATA cable and power lead attached to the drive, sealed with tape - in the freezer over night.Then removed, and attached to a PC as a slave drive, while sitting in a bucket of ice cubes completely covered.

It was making on hell of a noise, but managed to recover all the photos, and approx 30 GB of music, then it finally died :crying ------- Damn, missed approx 2 GB data.

icow
29-12-2010, 09:47 PM
I've done the Old freezer trick a few times BUT only since the person didn't want to pay out big $$ to send to a professional recovery business.

This is after trying all other alternatives - Slaving the drive, Linux etc.

Sometimes it works OK and allows you to get data off, BEFORE it thaws out, once that happens its dead. You only do the freezer trick, if you know the drive is stuffed, simply because it will be afterwards, and you can only do it once.

One particular "recovery" -- The person had LOTS of family photo's and loads of music. It was quite funny to see, SWMBO thought I was nuts :waughh: -- HDD in a sealed plastic Bag, with a SATA cable and power lead attached to the drive, sealed with tape - in the freezer over night.Then removed, and attached to a PC as a slave drive, while sitting in a bucket of ice cubes completely covered.

It was making on hell of a noise, but managed to recover all the photos, and approx 30 GB of music, then it finally died :crying ------- Damn, missed approx 2 GB data.

:lol:

Burnzee
29-12-2010, 09:54 PM
Hi SurferJoe

The problem behind this process is there are many variables but you can improve the odds. Even then there's no guarantee the method will work for your hard drive.

1. Do not try to boot from this Hard Drive.

2. Install Hard Drive into an external HDD case first. Put in two zip sealed plastic bags. Extract excess air.

3. Freeze both for at least twenty four hours.

4. Do not put on bench to extract data, keep cold. This prevents condensation. I put mine in a powered pre-chilled chilly bin.

5. Install and use a good back up program on a spare laptop. Suggest FBackUp. (http://www.fbackup.com/)

6. Take HDD case power supply and lappie to freezer door, run cords inside.

7. Work as quickly as possible, saving most important data first.

Why does this method work? Don't know, don't care. All I know is it does - sometimes!!

Hope this helps.

BURNZEE