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ghristle
24-12-2010, 06:44 PM
I recently bought a desktop from trademe. It had been running fairly fine for a week or so then all of a sudden whilst playing call of duty the computer very suddenly died. I suspected the computer of overheating as it was a very hot day and I had noticed the computer running very hot in the past so I didn't try to turn it on for another couple of hours (Someone once told me this was a good idea). Now when I try to turn it on a couple of LEDs on the motherboard flash and the PSU fan spins both for just a fraction of a second but otherwise no sign of life.

I have tried taking out all the ram sticks and putting them back in several times but this unfortunately did nothing. Also I noticed that although the computer doesn't start power is obviously getting to the motherboard because it will charge my phone that is plugged in through USB (this is even when the power cable is just plugged into the computer not just during the second it tries to boot).

Now obviously if anyone knows a fix that would be great, but I suspect I have irreparably melted some part of my computer, probably the CPU or the motherboard. What I would like to know is whether there is a way to tell which part is ruined or if anyone knows which part is more likely to be ruined.

Anyway, any advice is appreciated.
Thanks in advance

Speedy Gonzales
24-12-2010, 06:54 PM
Open the case and check the capacitors. To see if any are leaking / bulging

wainuitech
24-12-2010, 07:26 PM
Welcome to Press F1 :)

The problem could be a couple of things.

I'd try another known good working Power Supply, if the one in the PC has partly failed, it may not be providing enough power to boot the PC.

If the power supply is OK, then it may very well be the Motherboard.

OR it could even be the On Switch causing problems.

Easiest way to test the switch, is follow the wires down to the Front Panel connectors on the board, Pull off the two wires that connect the switch, then with a flat bladed screw driver, touch the two pins to make a circuit (this is basically what the switch does anyway) - If the PC fires up, its a switch problem, if not then possibly the board.

Doubt its the CPU - most CPU's have a thermal cut off, meaning if they get to hot they simply shut down, then when cool enough allow the PC to start again.

Just something else to try, when you have the PC off, actually pullout the power lead for around an hour, sometimes if the power supply actually doesn't have any power going to it, then it may just start,( lets all the stored power disperse) if this happens, new PSU time.

8ftmetalhaed
24-12-2010, 09:32 PM
We also haven't yet asked him of the specifications. If you're able to find out, what are the exact specs of your pc? Particularly the PSU, graphics card, and CPU.

ghristle
24-12-2010, 10:05 PM
Thanks for the advice. I will try these later tonight.
As for the computers specifications they are as follows:
CPU: Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600 2.4 GHz, 1066MHz FSB
PSU:Zalman ZM600-HP, Ultra-Quiet, 600W ATX PSU, Active PFC, SLI Ready.
GFX:Geforce 8800GT 256MB Ram
Mother Board:Gigabyte GA-P35-DS3P

sahilcc7
24-12-2010, 11:19 PM
Check the motherboard power(atx) connectors and pull them out then put back in.

:pf1mobmini:

ghristle
25-12-2010, 01:58 AM
Ok to update....
As someone suggested I found where the cable from the ON button lead and gave it a fiddle. I managed to boot the computer like this, at first with a screw driver but also just by plugging the cable back in and using the ON button. However when I put the graphics card back in (I had to move it to get to the ON plug) the machine stops booting. Not sure whether this means there is a problem with the motherboard, graphics card or Power Supply. But at least it's not a problem with the processor (as someone said earlier, it was quite unlikely anyway)

pctek
25-12-2010, 07:39 AM
However when I put the graphics card back in the machine stops booting.

Check the power supply. Then suspect the graphics card itself if the second PSU doesn't help.

It should all still be under warranty so take it back to the shop and get them to sort it, they should troubleshoot for you if you haven't got access to test parts.

Overheating generally just shuts the PC down instantly and it doesn't melt anything. Your case and/or room would have to be really crap for that to be the case - most people get overheating problems after having the PC for a while - once it starts to accumulate fluff and dust.


Oh just seen you bought it off Trademe. Bummer. No warranty then.

Paul.Cov
25-12-2010, 07:44 AM
Some Graphics cards require their own supply of power on a cable direct from the CPU. Are the GPU's powerplug points occupied (if it has any)?

wainuitech
25-12-2010, 09:37 AM
Ok to update....
As someone suggested I found where the cable from the ON button lead and gave it a fiddle. I managed to boot the computer like this, at first with a screw driver but also just by plugging the cable back in and using the ON button. However when I put the graphics card back in (I had to move it to get to the ON plug) the machine stops booting. Not sure whether this means there is a problem with the motherboard, graphics card or Power Supply. But at least it's not a problem with the processor (as someone said earlier, it was quite unlikely anyway) That'll be me :nerd:

Just a question - where you say "However when I put the graphics card back in (I had to move it to get to the ON plug) the machine stops booting."

Can we assume you mean the actual Power button, OR the front panel Headers ?

Looking at the Actual motherboard Layout As Shown Here (http://www.imagef1.net.nz/files/Gigabyte1293222404.jpg) -- As long as the Graphic Card is in the Correct PCI-E Slot, (Circled) theres no way it should be caught up with the front headers (arrow).

With the Graphic Card Out, and it boots (to a degree of course) do you hear any Beeps indicating no Graphic Card ? -- If you dont, then remove the RAM and try again, you "Should" hear a series of Beeps indicating No RAM.

ghristle
25-12-2010, 02:07 PM
When I got the computer the graphics card (which had a bulky cooler on it's underside) was in the lower PCIE 16 slot so it was just a little too awkward to get to the front headers.

When the graphics card is plugged in it has a cable marked "PCI-E1" going from it to the mother board. Though the computer won't boot whether this is plugged in or not. It only seems to care that the card is in the PCIE slot.

When I try to boot without the graphics card the lights come on and the fan starts but after about five second it makes a quick series of three beeps but otherwise seems to carry on working. When I take out the ram it starts but has a series of three slow beeps like a siren. Although now that i think about it I can't remember whether the

I have also tried booting it with and without the DVD writer and hard drive powered but this isn't making any. difference

I actually already have another graphics card coming in the mail sometime soon so I can check out whether that changes anything. The graphics card now that i look at it is looking a bit dodgy.

Hopefully sometime in the next few days I can get a hold of another power supply to try that out. Does anyone know what kind of wattage would my computer need to use to be sure it's not just short on the power requirements?

Also should it matter which PCIE 16 slot the graphics card is in

Speedy Gonzales
25-12-2010, 02:20 PM
It may matter what PCI-E slot you put it in. Since it looks like one's 16x the other is 4x (altho this may depend on the revision of the mobo)

wainuitech
25-12-2010, 05:14 PM
The series of beeps when components are removed is a good sign, at least the board is detecting they are not there.
When the graphics card is plugged in it has a cable marked "PCI-E1" going from it to the mother board.Normally, the Graphic Card goes in the PCI-E Slot that was circled - and the power Lead, comes from the Power Supply, NOT the motherboard.

If there is a Power Lead coming from the Board - As per the Manual Picture (http://www.imagef1.net.nz/files/Graphic_Card_Power.jpg) - Note it says "Extra Power" -- Normally this is not required on a single card -- look on the Power Leads, for the PCI-E connector, and plug that into the card, and disconnect the one from the board ( if thats how its setup).

Edited: Since you have another Graphic Card coming, hold off getting another PSU at the moment, you may fine the current card is the whole problem - With the New card, correctly mounted and powered up, it may run fine.

PENTIUM
26-12-2010, 04:26 PM
Can PcTech tell me where the Trade Me shop premises are?