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View Full Version : Help with buying a PC for video editing



Jessicagee
20-12-2010, 09:18 PM
I'm on the market for a new computer for HD video editing, as my old one can not cope and is well past upgrading. I'm far from an expert in regards to computers but have a budget of $1300 roughly and happy to buy of trademe. Apart from needing at least 8gb ram an at least a 1tb HDD and having no integrated graphics I'm open to suggestions (I also own a copy of Win7 64bit from my old computer). I am using Adobe Premiere for editing with 1080p 60fps footage so it can be very taxing. Really I'm just after someone to post a link and someone else to back them up and hopefully I'll be editing by next week. :thumbs:
I've tried to research AM vs Intel... but there seems to be a lot of conflicting advice so I've given up and hoping someone in the know can help.
Kind regards, Jessica. :thanks
http://www.trademe.co.nz/mcat-0002-4715-4717-/page-6/sort_order-buynow_desc.htm

Nomad
20-12-2010, 09:21 PM
TM might not be that cheap if you are looking for a relatively grunty machine.

Have you checked prices at say computerlounge.co.nz?

TM is good for 2nd hand clerical PCs for the mostly Ordinary Joe and Jane.

I suggest you look at a i7 CPU if you can afford it, or a i5, 8GB as you said, HDD as you said, any compatible motherboard should be fine if you are not overclocking etc...

Got a screen yet.


PS. The video card, any one should be fine if you are not in games as long as it free's up the system shared video RAM by not getting onboard.

Jessicagee
20-12-2010, 09:32 PM
Thanks Nomad really cool advice, I do have a screen a 42" LCD so def all good their. I just had a quick look but keep running into gaming pc's which are probably similar, what would you suggest? Thanks for the quick reply.

Speedy Gonzales
20-12-2010, 09:32 PM
Another program that you can try is Powerdirector 9 (http://www.cyberlink.com/products/powerdirector/overview_en_US.html). It came out recently, and is native 64 bit

Nomad
20-12-2010, 09:36 PM
I would say, have a look at the parts.

i7 CPU if you can afford it.
A motherboard that is compatible and some compatible 8GB RAM, you might want 2x (pieces) of 4GB to get your 8GB so it's a bit faster.

I think Computer Lounge has a system builder online so you can just select all the parts you want that are compatible using drop down menus. They build it for you and courier to your door for free. They're very reputable.

You can of course your own case as how much gaming or reserver as you like :)

For the power supply you may want to look at Enermax. Someone should be able to advise you on what wattage is for your needs.

For the motherboard good ones are ASUS or Gigabytes but there are others...

Chilling_Silence
20-12-2010, 09:44 PM
The RAM is overkill, you really want to spend the money on a CPU, as the RAM is easier to upgrade later, and RAM won't be as much of a bottleneck.
A decent GPU that you can offload the decoding to, and potentially even some of the encoding is a worthwhile investment.

Edit: Something like this is quite probably good bang-for-buck:
http://pbtech.co.nz/index.php?z=p&p=WKSPB1441&name=PB-1441-AMD-Quadcore-955-CPU--4G-DDR3---1TB-HDD-55
Quad-core, 4GB RAM, decent GPU to offload the video playback to. From there it's just up to you to buy a nice monitor, keyboard, mouse, and you should come in right on budget!!

Jessicagee
20-12-2010, 09:46 PM
Thankyou everyone learning heaps!

qazwsxokmijn
20-12-2010, 09:54 PM
If I'm not mistaken video editing programs take advantage of multi-core CPUs? If that's the case you should heavily consider AMD's 6-core Thuban instead of quad core i7s (there are a couple of 6-core i7s, but they're over $1200 each!!!).

Speedy Gonzales
20-12-2010, 09:58 PM
Some may also take advantage of Nvidia cards that support CUDA as well

I see some converter programs state you'll get things done 5x faster with one. The same thing may apply to video editing programs

AvonBill
20-12-2010, 11:12 PM
That copy of Windows 7 you have will need to be a retail version, not an OEM version which is not transferable to a new machine.

pctek
21-12-2010, 08:09 AM
Ihave a budget of $1300 and happy to buy of trademe.

With a decent budget like that, why would you want to resort to Trademe?
The majority exaggerate or inaccurately report specifications, don't list brand of parts (it matters), don't give proper warranty and probably don't/can't be found when/if something does go wrong.

Go to a reputable shop.

Playtech or Computer lounge.
They can also advise you on what would be suitable too.

paulw
21-12-2010, 08:29 AM
That copy of Windows 7 you have will need to be a retail version, not an OEM version which is not transferable to a new machine.

And how many people do that??

wratterus
21-12-2010, 09:17 AM
With a decent budget like that, why would you want to resort to Trademe?
The majority exaggerate or inaccurately report specifications, don't list brand of parts (it matters), don't give proper warranty and probably don't/can't be found when/if something does go wrong.

Go to a reputable shop.

Playtech or Computer lounge.
They can also advise you on what would be suitable too.

x2, Highly recommend ComputerLounge for this.

Chilling_Silence
21-12-2010, 09:26 AM
Solid points from AvonBill & pctek!

CYaBro
21-12-2010, 09:47 AM
I hate to say it but wouldn't a MAC be better for video editing?

wratterus
21-12-2010, 09:52 AM
Not for $1300 it wouldn't be! :p

inphinity
21-12-2010, 09:55 AM
I hate to say it but wouldn't a MAC be better for video editing?

The correct answer in this case would be "No". An 8- or 12-core Mac Pro would be very good, but they start at around 5 times the budget posted in this thread, so are out of the picture.

On a more useful note, I'd look at a Phenom 1055T, M4A87TD, 8GB DDR3-1600, GTX460 1GB, Corsair 650W PSU as a base, add in whatever drives you want and a case.

dugimodo
21-12-2010, 10:05 AM
Just a note about the 6 core AMD vs Quad core intel comment, much as I would like to support AMD they simply aren't as fast as intel currently. The fastest 6 core AMD available barely matches mainstream intel Quad cores and generates a lot more heat.

My advice is similar to most here, the best quad core i5 or i7 you can afford, a good brand motherboard and a reasonable graphics card. If memory bandwidth is important an i7 X58 chipset based system with triple channel RAM (6G should be enough) is the way to go, but that'll probably blow your budget.

As for offloading decoding to the graphics cards most discrete cards handle this fine but very few encoders or transcoders actually use the graphics card to help despite this being possible for quite some time now.

inphinity
21-12-2010, 10:31 AM
The fastest 6 core AMD available barely matches mainstream intel Quad cores and generates a lot more heat.


Actually, the Phenom II x6's are very competitive when it comes to multi-threaded applications - including Adobe Premiere Pro - compared to the i5's. To step up from the 1055T, for example, which is about $290, you need to look at an i7, which start at around $400. It's price-point puts it as a direct competitor to the i5-760, and they are very similar in performance. Specific applications or games one or the other may be better, but overall, you'd be hard-pressed to separate them.

A system based around either AMD's 1055T or Intel's i5-760 will, in my opinion, be very capable of meeting the original poster's needs.

I tend towards AMD in such cases because the cheaper motherboard chipsets tend to be better, so you can get overall better value from the system in many cases. Given that RAM, HDD, GPU etc are compatible across both, when you have a motherboard + CPU combo of either
1055t + 870-based board for ~$450
i5-760 + P55-based board for ~$500

The 760 may be 3% faster, but it's 11% more expensive, and so for many cases the AMD option represents better value.

For sure, if we had someone going "Guys I want to build the ultimate gaming PC and I don't really care about price" I'd be pointing at the i7's. Nothing from AMD at present can match the high-end i7s performance. But at the entry-and mid-range price-points, the two companies are definitely competitive, and options from both are well worth considering.

At the end of the day, it's probably going to come down to what the best overall package deal offered by, say, CL or Playtech is.

But for the price range indicated, those would be the two main CPUs I'd be looking to base the build around - AMD 1055t, or Intel i5-760.

dugimodo
21-12-2010, 11:06 AM
I don't disagree, the i5 is exactly the sort of thing I meant by mainstream intel quad core.

AMD dont currently have an answer for the i7 but have always performed well compared to similarly priced inTel CPU's.

The point I was attempting to make is the 6 cores of the AMD offer no real advantage over the 4 cores of say an i5 or cheaper i7.

inphinity
21-12-2010, 11:12 AM
I don't disagree, the i5 is exactly the sort of thing I meant by mainstream intel quad core.

AMD dont currently have an answer for the i7 but have always performed well compared to similarly priced inTel CPU's.

The point I was attempting to make is the 6 cores of the AMD offer no real advantage over the 4 cores of say an i5 or cheaper i7.

Oh, agreed, but they perform similarly, and are priced similarly, so technical differences aside, they will both provide a very similar experience to the user :)

BBCmicro
21-12-2010, 02:39 PM
I use Win7pro64 and Adobe Premiere Pro2 for video editing. I bought a new computer from Computer Lounge in March this year. It works very well:

CPU: i5-750 ("4 true cores")
RAM: 8GB 1333MHz
Motherboard: Gigabyte P55A (the 'A' means has USB-3)
Case: forget its name (Chakra?) but it has a 250mm fan in the side (= quiet) and eSATA+USB ports facing up at the front
Videocard: ATI 5450 (not powerful enough - it doesn't render transitions during timeline scrub. I am thinking of replacing it with an Nvidia 240 (I think) which can also be 'silent', like the 5450 )

As another poster has said, the 8GB is a bit overkill. But 4GB seems a bit light and if you go above 4GB you might as well go for 8GB

I have two eSATA caddies which I consider essential for video/photo editing. They allow me to work on someone's video then pop the HDD out and hide it when I leave the house. I don't like the idea of a burglar getting hold of someone's personal material entrusted to my care...

utopian201
21-12-2010, 04:10 PM
As for offloading decoding to the graphics cards most discrete cards handle this fine but very few encoders or transcoders actually use the graphics card to help despite this being possible for quite some time now.

This is what I thought...



CPU: i5-750 ("4 true cores")
RAM: 8GB 1333MHz
Motherboard: Gigabyte P55A (the 'A' means has USB-3)
Case: forget its name (Chakra?) but it has a 250mm fan in the side (= quiet) and eSATA+USB ports facing up at the front
Videocard: ATI 5450 (not powerful enough - it doesn't render transitions during timeline scrub. I am thinking of replacing it with an Nvidia 240 (I think) which can also be 'silent', like the 5450 )

Just out of curiosity, if you spent the money you had on the graphics card on a better processor (and used integrated graphics), overall, would you get faster encodings?

inphinity
21-12-2010, 04:37 PM
This is what I thought...



Just out of curiosity, if you spent the money you had on the graphics card on a better processor (and used integrated graphics), overall, would you get faster encodings?

I suspect you'd be looking at either an 1100T or i7-930, given the 5450 is about $120, so those would both be in the right price ballpark to redirect that spend. In either case, you probably would get slightly faster encoding than with the i5-750, but by how much would depend heavily on how well the application you're using does or doesn't take advantage of various hardware acceleration features on a graphics card. Given similar specs aside from CPU, I'd say either of these options would be about 20% faster than the i5-750 for that sort of task.