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View Full Version : Motherboard heat sink loose in case



GorCh
09-12-2010, 09:09 PM
Hi all,

Been helping some family members with their computer, and opened up the tower to check the motherboard model number. Unpleasantly surprised to find a heat sink sitting in the bottom of the case.

After some investigation I found that the smaller clip, attached to the motherboard, that the spring arm of the heat sink wedged into had come off.

After I got the PC home, I found the clip in the dust bunnies in the bottom of the PC.

Can anyone give me some pointers as to how to reattach the clip to the computer? Also can anyone tell me which chip this heat sink is protecting?

Photos of the heatsink, the small clip and the motherboard are attached (sorry about small text on motherboard one).

Regards,

GorCh

Paul.Cov
09-12-2010, 09:26 PM
Another image of the mobo from a different angle here:
http://www.clemsco.com/servlet/the-2130/eMachines-VC37-Socket-478/Detail

I'd guess it's the GPU that has lost the heatsink, with the CPU hidden from view up under the PSU.
If it's still working, then no harm done hopefully.
Ideally it should go back on with some fresh thermal paste under it.

The clip can hopefully be re-soldered to the board.

GorCh
09-12-2010, 09:38 PM
Ok, thanks for the tips. Looks like a similar motherboard at the very least, though this one has only two Ram slots.

Soldering eh? Could be an adventure.

GorCh
09-12-2010, 09:53 PM
Does installing a graphics card bypass the onboard GPU at all? Or will the onboard one be called during bios boot etc?

SP8's
09-12-2010, 09:54 PM
Ok, thanks for the tips. Looks like a similar motherboard at the very least, though this one has only two Ram slots.

Soldering eh? Could be an adventure.

Soldering advise .... practice on some old wire or totally stuffed PSB before you dive in and get to the "important" stuff. It's not difficult but take your time, melt some solder onto the soldering iron tip ... then wipe it off again ... or flick it onto the carpet if your Mum doesn't mind that sort of thing ... before you start soldering anything. Better to make a mess of something that's not going to cost $$$

No Wucking Furries .... :D

Speedy Gonzales
09-12-2010, 09:54 PM
Should disable it

GorCh
09-12-2010, 10:15 PM
Oh I'm happy enough soldering, just haven't done it on a PCB. Though I guess seeing it is going onto where the clip is there are prob no important joints back there.

That being said, its not a PC worth any money really, just an old dunger that has been passed through about 3 people before ending up at the grandmothers. I opened it up to begin with to investigate upgrading the amount of ram from a whopping 128MB. I've got another old box that I can chuck the bits in if it comes to it.

On another thought, am I breaking many rules if I slather on some thermal grease, pop some hot glue round the sides and jam/gently place the heat sink home? I would then install an old grphx card, the onboard would be for redundancy.

GorCh
09-12-2010, 10:16 PM
As for the soldering, my mother wouldn't mind at all, but my landlady would be significantly less impressed at the shiny sparkles introduced to the carpet :devil

SP8's
09-12-2010, 10:35 PM
Time to take Mantrol GorCH .... go for it ...:D

The Error Guy
09-12-2010, 10:36 PM
Oh I'm happy enough soldering, just haven't done it on a PCB. Though I guess seeing it is going onto where the clip is there are prob no important joints back there.

That being said, its not a PC worth any money really, just an old dunger that has been passed through about 3 people before ending up at the grandmothers. I opened it up to begin with to investigate upgrading the amount of ram from a whopping 128MB. I've got another old box that I can chuck the bits in if it comes to it.

On another thought, am I breaking many rules if I slather on some thermal grease, pop some hot glue round the sides and jam/gently place the heat sink home? I would then install an old grphx card, the onboard would be for redundancy.

should work with the grease and glue... until you realize hot glue does not stick to mobo's.

Answer 1: Duct Tape
Answer 2: New gfx card. I have an Nvidia Vanta LT if you want it.

Paul.Cov
09-12-2010, 10:55 PM
An alternative would be to carefully drill through the two holes left by the fixing loop and then tie the heatsink down at that end with a loop of nylon through the holes.
Best to use a drill bit no bigger than 1mm.

Given that it survived no heat sink at all, it'll probably survive continuing with the dregs of the old thermal paste as well once you reseat the sink.

Agent_24
10-12-2010, 02:37 AM
On another thought, am I breaking many rules if I slather on some thermal grease, pop some hot glue round the sides

Yes. Don't slather it anywhere. Too much and it doesn't work very well. You only need a small amount.

Hot glue will probably just melt if attached to a heatsink (which gets hot)

Arctic Alumina Thermal Adhesive is probably a better idea. It's basically thermal paste and glue in the same thing.


Though, if the vias haven't been ripped out, resoldering those clips will be the best idea. Then it might pay to get some better cooling if they came out because they heated up and caused the solder to crack.

GorCh
10-12-2010, 11:18 AM
Well I have taken it all apart, and am going to go for the professional route. Got some new thermal paste and will resolder the clip. Thanks for the tip regarding amount Agent_24.

Will let you all know how it goes.

GorCh
10-12-2010, 03:42 PM
So got it all done. Solder job onto the m-board went quite well if I say so myself. After I eventually debugged the IDE cable conflicts that were occurring, I discovered that the PC uses DDR ram, of which I have none lying about, and so the whole exercise of adding ram was in vain anyway. Ah well, at least I got a learning experience out of it.

Cheers for all the help,

GorCh

Agent_24
10-12-2010, 05:27 PM
Good to hear!

Snorkbox
10-12-2010, 05:35 PM
You can still buy DDR RAM if you want to.