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View Full Version : What's a good SVG editor?



ubergeek85
24-11-2010, 06:06 PM
Hi all. Can anyone recommend me a good vector-based image editing program? It's gotta be able to work with SVG's, but it doesn't need advanced functions, just things like cut/copy/paste/move/crop/fill, ya'know, kinda like paint.

Thanks.

Erayd
24-11-2010, 06:11 PM
Inkscape's not bad.

SoniKalien
24-11-2010, 06:23 PM
Fireworks is good for this, dunno if it handles SVGs but will import AI etc

ubergeek85
24-11-2010, 11:50 PM
Thanks guys. Gave inkscape a go, pretty much fits the bill, although it has quite a few more features that I seem to need, although I might just need to learn how to properly work with vector graphics :D

Anyway, just made this bad-boy.

SoniKalien
25-11-2010, 12:03 AM
Well done :) Sometimes you might find that exporting as a gif will make a smaller file and look better than a jpg, up to a certain point.

ubergeek85
25-11-2010, 12:07 AM
At 47Kb (or 130), I wouldn't worry about the size too much ;)

It looks far better at full-res, I think vBulletin just butchered it a bit during the resizing.

Attached file: My1290600439.png (http://www.imagef1.net.nz/files/My1290600439.png) (130 KB)

SoniKalien
25-11-2010, 12:13 AM
Yea that happens, it's just that jpg gives you artifacts, gif cuts down on the colours producing a purer image, as can png's

Erayd
25-11-2010, 06:39 AM
Yea that happens, it's just that jpg gives you artifacts...Not as badly as GIF, unless you're talking about an image with very uniform colour distribution. While GIF can use an indexed palette, it's still limited to a total 8-bit colour space (i.e. max 255 colours), as compared to JPEG's 24, or PNG's 24/32.


...gif cuts down on the colours producing a purer image...Not quite. GIF uses an indexed palette and colour dithering in order to cram your image into a tiny colour space. If your image requires more colours than this in order to look good (and many do, particularly photographs), then GIF will end up looking far worse than JPEG.


...as can png'sThe difference being that PNG has a 24bit RGB / 32bit RGBA colour space available to store the pallette, which in most cases makes it effectively a lossless format; few images require more than this, and in most cases the difference between the PNG and the original is indistinguishable.

SoniKalien
25-11-2010, 10:11 AM
Well, since you want to get technical...


Not as badly as GIF, unless you're talking about an image with very uniform colour distribution.

Yes I am which is why I said "sometimes", and mentioned somewhere that it would be more appropriate for simple vector graphics (vs eg photos)


While GIF can use an indexed palette, it's still limited to a total 8-bit colour space (i.e. max 255 colours), as compared to JPEG's 24, or PNG's 24/32....Not quite. GIF uses an indexed palette and colour dithering in order to cram your image into a tiny colour space. If your image requires more colours than this in order to look good (and many do, particularly photographs), then GIF will end up looking far worse than JPEG.

Yes I realise this which is why I said "sometimes". GIFs can also have an 'adaptive' pallette, cutting down on the number of colours it stores, reducing file size dramatically. You can also use dithering to 'blend' 2 colours. BTW 'dithering' is different to 'artifacts'.


The difference being that PNG has a 24bit RGB / 32bit RGBA colour space available to store the pallette, which in most cases makes it effectively a lossless format; few images require more than this, and in most cases the difference between the PNG and the original is indistinguishable.

I know that :) If the original is a JPG, then it's going to boil down to compression settings.. the more compression, the lower the filesize, the more artifacts you get, the worse the picture looks.

Basically I was saying in a roundabout and albeit simple way that OP's vector image probably would have looked better as a GIF, and probably have a smaller filesize.

Anything else you want to nitpick over? :nerd:

Erayd
25-11-2010, 04:10 PM
Well, since you want to get technical...:D.


...BTW 'dithering' is different to 'artifacts'.Absolutely; I never claimed they were the same thing. When I mentioned artifacts, that's precisely what I meant: colour artifacts (GIF), and compression artifacts (JPEG).


Basically I was saying in a roundabout and albeit simple way that OP's vector image probably would have looked better as a GIF, and probably have a smaller filesize.Agreed - that particular file is an ideal candidate :thumbs:


Anything else you want to nitpick over? :nerd:I live to nitpick!

No fodder left here though; other than a bit of excessive generality your posts were useful, informative, and largely accurate :D.