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View Full Version : Got my W7 pro 64 bit working - best way to copy?



Fishb8
20-11-2010, 12:20 PM
I've dual booted with Vista HB and got all my progs working well on my W7 so I'd like to make a copy of the OS (disc?).
My Vista is on a 500 GB hard drive, my W7 on a separate 150 GB HD and I have 2 external USB HDs with plenty of spare capacity.
If I clone the W7, does it leave the original intact?
What's the best way of copying my W7, please?

KarameaDave
20-11-2010, 12:52 PM
Well, this one is built in.

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Back-up-your-programs-system-settings-and-files

Paul.Cov
20-11-2010, 08:01 PM
Yeah, as is usual, Win7 is a twisted mass of virtual folders, and it's almost impossible to actually know where your files really reside, or where to restore your backup folder to.

I support KarameaDave in thinking that you'd be best to use the built in Win7 backup routines - it does allow you to select the drive and folder to put the backup file onto, and then you can in turn take that file and burn to DVD as well. Odds are that this file will be supported by other routines built into the Win7 setup disc, so if the worst comes to the worst all you'll need is your Win7 disc, and your backup disc (hopefully).

Fishb8
21-11-2010, 12:17 PM
Well, this one is built in.

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Back-up-your-programs-system-settings-and-files

Have done that!
Decided to use Acronis (as I had it) and made a clone, as well.
OK, so I've made a clone, using Acronis. I can't boot from the new clone - what do I have to do?

Terry Porritt
21-11-2010, 01:01 PM
If you clone one drive to another, then most often that cloned drive will not boot because the hardware has changed.
You may get an error screen which tells you to insert your Windows install disk, reboot, and then choose "repair".

This will change and repair the startup files on the cloned drive and it should then boot ok.

KarameaDave
21-11-2010, 01:29 PM
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/927392
Might help you if Terry's suggestion doesn't.

CliveM
21-11-2010, 03:02 PM
I had the same problem using Acronis Home ie. the clone would not boot. I made a clone using Casper.6 (trial is full version good for 30 days runs on xp vista w7) That gives an exact copy in all respects which is totaly replacable with the original disk. Boots and runs as expected the system does not know you have changed anything.

Terry Porritt
21-11-2010, 04:03 PM
I had the same problem using Acronis Home ie. the clone would not boot. I made a clone using Casper.6 (trial is full version good for 30 days runs on xp vista w7) That gives an exact copy in all respects which is totaly replacable with the original disk. Boots and runs as expected the system does not know you have changed anything.

This is interesting. I've used Ghost 2002 to make clones and for a long time have used hard drive plugin caddies both for the main hard drive and for the backup drive.

With XP, the cloned drive when plugged in as "master" would boot through to Windows, but got a message saying new hardware detected and being installed and a reboot then required. The clone hard drive details would be written into Device Manager. This was even with identicle drives but different serial numbers, as well as completely different drives.

With Windows 7 Home 32 bit, the cloned drive will only boot after going through the 'startup repair' routine mentioned previously.

Fishb8
21-11-2010, 05:45 PM
I tried the Repair option and still no go.
Downloaded Casper.6 and gave that a go, again it wouldn't boot up but tried the start up repair option, using the installation disc - repaired and re-booted and the new "recovered" drive booted up perfectly.
Casper wouldn't let me change the partition size but did that using Partition Magic and all running sweetly. Used EasyBCD to set the default boot and all sweet!
Thanks for the help!

dugimodo
22-11-2010, 09:53 AM
If you installed Win 7 on a second hard drive with Vista already running then your boot files are on the Vista Drive not the Win 7 drive and you need the Vista drive in order to boot.

I came across this when trying to remove XP (installed first) from my dual boot setup. One way around it is to use Easy BCD and use it's change boot drive option - it will move the boot files and menu to the drive specified.

So if you are trying to boot from a clone of the Win 7 drive without the Vista drive set as boot it won't work. The repair option from the windows disk needs to be run at least 3 times to fix this as it tries different things each time. I never got that method to work. Easy BCD however took about 30 secs to change my boot drive.

CliveM
22-11-2010, 10:31 AM
My understanding of a clone is that it is an exact copy of the original disk regardles of what is on it.
Certainly I have been using them as such for some years, since XP was first introduced.
I make a clone before every major change (at least monthly) if it turns to custard I just swap the disks and I am back in business if a few minutes.
I also run the usual daily and weekly backup routines for data.
The other advantage of a clone is that anything on it is easily readable if it is needed.

Chilling_Silence
22-11-2010, 10:47 AM
http://majorgeeks.com/SelfImage_d5588.html

Terry Porritt
22-11-2010, 11:31 AM
My understanding of a clone is that it is an exact copy of the original disk regardles of what is on it.
Certainly I have been using them as such for some years, since XP was first introduced.
I make a clone before every major change (at least monthly) if it turns to custard I just swap the disks and I am back in business if a few minutes.
I also run the usual daily and weekly backup routines for data.
The other advantage of a clone is that anything on it is easily readable if it is needed.

That is so, a clone is an exact copy, hence it copies the hardware data of the original set up.
When a cloned drive is now booted, Windows says ooopsy, someones changed the hard drive details to what it says in Device Manager, I'd better check and install the correct drive.

It does this in XP without too much fuss, but for some reason in Win 7 it requires a 'startup repair' to detect and write in the new drive details.

CliveM
22-11-2010, 03:14 PM
That is so, a clone is an exact copy, hence it copies the hardware data of the original set up.
When a cloned drive is now booted, Windows says ooopsy, someones changed the hard drive details to what it says in Device Manager, I'd better check and install the correct drive.

It does this in XP without too much fuss, but for some reason in Win 7 it requires a 'startup repair' to detect and write in the new drive details.

My current system is W7 64 bit I upgraded from a 500 GB drive to my new 150 GB SSD using a Casper clone without problem about 10 days ago. Perhaps I was just lucky :)