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feersumendjinn
16-11-2010, 05:45 PM
to ensure compatibility with IPV6 :eek:
http://www.smh.com.au/technology/technology-news/crunch-time-for-upgrade-of-internet-addresses-that-are-running-out-20101116-17v26.html

The biggest issue is that IPv4 and IPv6 don't talk to each other. Though IPv6 devices communicate happily with their less-evolved IPv4 cousins, it doesn't work the other way.
A breakdown is inevitable. It won't be immediate and it won't be dramatic but it will happen, slowly and subtly, as little bits, mostly the newer IPv6 bits of the internet, fail to appear to anyone still using IPv4 architecture.
The IPv4 internet and all the devices and sites we're accessing now will still work exactly as they do now but when IPv6 devices and sites start appearing online, the existing IPv4 infrastructure simply won't be capable of recognising them and small, random pockets of the new internet will be inaccessible by older hand-helds, routers, modems, servers and operating systems.
Upgraded websites won't appear on machines running old software and hardware and even your shiny new IPv6-ready handset will not be able to display your weather update because your telco may not have upgraded its own IPv4 back end.

Erayd
16-11-2010, 06:29 PM
For anyone interested in playing with a very capable ipv6-compatible routing platform, I highly recommend Vyatta (http://www.vyatta.com/). It sports a huge array of features, and the documentation is outstanding (and runs to several thousand pages :eek:).

I run this on my primary router at home, using both ipv4 and ipv6.

Note that Vyatta isn't suitable for 'newbie' users; it's intended for those who properly understand enterprise networking, and understand how to RTFM.

somebody
16-11-2010, 06:30 PM
Note that Vyatta isn't suitable for 'newbie' users; it's intended for those who properly understand enterprise networking, and understand how to RTFM.

Which realistically rules out 95% of us on this forum :)

Erayd
16-11-2010, 06:32 PM
Which realistically rules out 95% of us on this forum :)Naturally, but the remaining 5% may be interested, which is why I posted it, and the disclaimer was to save the other 95% the hassle of figuring that out themselves.

You yourself fit into the 5% I think; although you weren't the target audience, as I believe I already had a bit of a rant to you about it via IM. No, I'm not a Vyatta reseller :rolleyes:.

somebody
16-11-2010, 06:39 PM
No, I'm not a Vyatta reseller :rolleyes:.

... yet.

R2x1
16-11-2010, 06:41 PM
I rather fudge that one - drop the R and just aim to FTM

ubergeek85
16-11-2010, 10:33 PM
IPv6 is like the elephant in the room. We all know about it, but don't want to deal with it.

IPv4 is already on life support with the likes of NAT as it is.

The sooner the better I say.

Although tech support could get a few headaches; "whats your IP address ma'am?" "2001:0db8:85a3:7bc4:ae9e:8a2e:0370:7334"

Erayd
16-11-2010, 11:18 PM
Although tech support could get a few headaches; "whats your IP address ma'am?" "2001:0db8:85a3:7bc4:ae9e:8a2e:0370:7334"Mmm, for the kind of tech support that would need an IP, it's not usually necessary to ask the customer for it. "What's your service tag ma'am?" would be a more appropriate question, the response to which would usually look something like "4G5LY1S", or "Where do I find that?".

Yes, I know not everybody's serials / service tags are as nice as Dell's, but they're all generally far nicer to deal with than IP addresses, especially for clients who are on DHCP.

utopian201
17-11-2010, 08:07 AM
It will be years before people need to transition. Nothing to worry about for several years yet; the place I work at has been developing IPv6 products for several years in anticipation, still waiting for it to take off...
It is bigger in Japan and China.

robsonde
17-11-2010, 09:17 AM
It is bigger in Japan and China.

when you say bigger you mean almost 2% of the market...


I will say this now and I stand by this prediction:
there will be no need for IPV6 for a home user in the next two years.
there may be a few home users who have IPV6, but they will only by the geeks who are playing with toys.
all ISP's will still have IPV4 as the core service.

Gobe1
17-11-2010, 09:21 AM
Are people getting IPv6 address now? If not, why not

Safari
17-11-2010, 09:25 AM
Are people getting IPv6 address now? If not, why not

Because there is no need for IPv6 yet and current modems are not compatible anyway.