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Mike
16-10-2010, 11:33 AM
we're trying to remove the starter motor from my car, but there's one bolt that just won't budge. Any suggestions how to get it out? tried hitting it to loosen it (not much room in there, so really just taps), used the CRC (sprayed it liberally then left it overnight), tried a lever (my tent pole is now in two pieces)...

I'm not the car guy :) so have no suggestions, but he's completely stumped :(

Mike.

--Wolf--
16-10-2010, 11:42 AM
There's something you can get called freeze and release (I think that's what it was called) worked really well last time I used it.

Mike
16-10-2010, 11:49 AM
is that just something I can get from supercheap or somewhere?

Mike.

Speedy Gonzales
16-10-2010, 11:51 AM
Type it in google

TickTech
16-10-2010, 12:10 PM
is that just something I can get from supercheap or somewhere?

Mike.

Supercheap has everything:thumbs:

Mike
16-10-2010, 12:15 PM
thanks guys :) other car-guy friend with BIGGER tools came around and had it undone within a minute :D

Cheers,
Mike.

feersumendjinn
16-10-2010, 12:29 PM
Try hitting the bolt on the end (not the side) with the biggest hammer you can find/will fit (use a piece of rod as an extension if you can get it in), then try using a single hex socket (six points, not the normal 12, grips the bolthead better, transmitting more torque) with " drive if you've got it.

Edit: See, bigger is better! :rolleyes::D

The Error Guy
16-10-2010, 12:39 PM
Hate stuck bolts, especially on pumps, vacuum pumps are really annoying (about 12 bolts on each face) we usually hit it with a big hammer (like feersumendjinn) or if that doesn't work, heat up with the blow torch. expanding metal does wonders.

prefect
16-10-2010, 01:26 PM
If in doubt give it a clout works for me sorry Phil B.
I whack them with a cold chisel on the flats, and boy do I have a collection of chisels and hammers. Trick is to use a single hex socket on tight bolts invest in a rattle gun if you do a bit of work on cars. Let all that burning coal at Huntly do the job for you lol.
Some one in this jap factories does up bolts and banjo connections real tight I think of them when something slips and takes out my hand.

pctek
16-10-2010, 02:09 PM
Husband used to use a combination of CRC, whacking great sledge hammers and massive wrenches. Not the cheap ones - they snap.

Car repairs - bleh.

jareemon
16-10-2010, 02:38 PM
Torque wrenches are the big long ones, and as pctek said, cheap tools do break very easily

plod
16-10-2010, 02:59 PM
Torque wrenches are the big long ones, and as pctek said, cheap tools do break very easily
Torque wrenches come in many sizes, for many jobs. Don't know of anyone that uses one for undoing stuff though. A breaker bar is what you are after

The Error Guy
16-10-2010, 03:15 PM
Wrench + metal pipe = our workshop cheap torque wrench

feersumendjinn
16-10-2010, 03:18 PM
http://www.google.co.nz/imgres?imgurl=http://www.machinemart.co.uk/images/library/product/large/04/040210077.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.machinemart.co.uk/shop/product/details/pro77-1-2in-drive-breaker-bar/path/ratchets-torque-wrenches-2&h=500&w=500&sz=13&tbnid=2VqYbb9blR9qcM:&tbnh=130&tbnw=130&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dbreaker%2Bbar&zoom=1&q=breaker+bar&usg=__Hp7h_B0aKBwv-y1Zpz-QBNt-Gps=&sa=X&ei=8wq5TNL0DZL0tgO5-LmyDw&ved=0CDAQ9QEwBw

SurferJoe46
16-10-2010, 03:23 PM
Hey, feersumendjinn:::

That's a cheap copy of a Snap-On breaker bar - and it's only an 18 incher. Most mechanics buy the 24, 36 and 48 inch version if they want some real power.

My shortest breaker bar is 36 inches or about 900mm long. Of course, I don't get dirty any more; I'm retired.

Safari
16-10-2010, 03:27 PM
Wrench + metal pipe = our workshop cheap torque wrench

That is not very professional, if you are still training you should be told to do it correctly. Manufactures stipulate the correct torque on bolts for a reason so go and get yourself a torque wrench and do the job correctly.

kahawai chaser
16-10-2010, 03:52 PM
Wrench + metal pipe = our workshop cheap torque wrench

Yeah it's what I use - specially for removing front axle nuts (36 mm) when replacing/cleaning cv joints.

prefect
16-10-2010, 04:03 PM
I find rectangular box section steel is good better than round pipe because you need a large diameter to get over the end of a ROE spanner, rectangular you can slip it over the end of the spanner.
If its long enough something is always going to happen.
CRC WD40 not going to help you if something is done up too tight its much overrated the stuff has to get thru the rust on a rusty thread and thats not going to happen is it? I fits seized by heat all the CRC in the world isnt going to help

feersumendjinn
16-10-2010, 04:20 PM
Hey, feersumendjinn:::

That's a cheap copy of a Snap-On breaker bar - and it's only an 18 incher. Most mechanics buy the 24, 36 and 48 inch version if they want some real power.

My shortest breaker bar is 36 inches or about 900mm long. Of course, I don't get dirty any more; I'm retired.
Yeah, I thought that too.
Unfortunately, I still have to get down and dirty :(.

pctek
16-10-2010, 06:07 PM
Torque wrenches are the big long ones

No. he had those. But he just used a large normal one - because you are bashing it with the sledgehammer.

Safari
16-10-2010, 06:15 PM
No. he had those. But he just used a large normal one - because you are bashing it with the sledgehammer.

Get your terminology right people
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torque_wrench
A torque wrench is a tool used to precisely apply a specific torque to a fastener such as a nut or bolt.
A torque wrench is used where the tightness of screws and bolts is crucial. It allows the operator to measure the torque applied to the fastener so it can be matched to the specifications for a particular application.

The Error Guy
16-10-2010, 06:20 PM
That is not very professional, if you are still training you should be told to do it correctly. Manufactures stipulate the correct torque on bolts for a reason so go and get yourself a torque wrench and do the job correctly.

If we had a proper torque wrench i'd assume i'd be taught how to use it, instead we only have plenty of scraps of steel pipe lying around (as you'd expect in a pumping and irrigation workshop) so we just use that. not that we do it very often, sure as hell works when required though

Jester
16-10-2010, 07:41 PM
.. still not getting the principle or terminolgy here Error Guy.

You don't use a torque wrench to loosen nuts, any length of pipe used as a lever does the trick as you've found. You use a torque wrench when you want to tighten (or torque) a nut up to but not over a specific level of tightness. They either have a pointer and a dial or click once you reach the predetermined pressure.

I stripped a few threads and make a simple motorbike repair job a nightmare once till I grabbed my old man's torque wrench.

The Error Guy
16-10-2010, 08:18 PM
.. still not getting the principle or terminolgy here Error Guy.

You don't use a torque wrench to loosen nuts, any length of pipe used as a lever does the trick as you've found. You use a torque wrench when you want to tighten (or torque) a nut up to but not over a specific level of tightness. They either have a pointer and a dial or click once you reach the predetermined pressure.

I stripped a few threads and make a simple motorbike repair job a nightmare once till I grabbed my old man's torque wrench.

of course not! until now I had never been enlightened to what a torque wrench actually is. now that I know I will refrain from missing the point :thanks

kahawai chaser
16-10-2010, 08:55 PM
Then there may be 3 stage torque settings and criss-cross patterns for engine head/rocker cover bolts, which is time consuming sometimes. e.g. for Toyota super custom - 18 long drop bolts I think.

Though a uncle years ago got to "feel" torque settings for the old Holden/Belmont 186/202 heads, when I use to watch/help him plenty of times. I ended up with his torque wrench, a old British Norbar torque wrench, still ok, but don't know about accuracy.