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View Full Version : Marauding Bands Of Bunnies.............



SurferJoe46
16-10-2010, 06:36 AM
DENVER, COLORADO, USA - One air traveler says rabbits took a chunk out of his car while it was parked at Denver International Airport.

After a nine day stay at DIA's Pike's Peak lot, Dexter Meyer returned from vacation and found that his car would barely start.

"The (repair man) later called me and told me that rodents had eaten through the wires," said Meyer. That's what the VW dealer said was wrong with his brand new Jetta.

"You didn't just pick the car up from the airport did you?" the dealer asked Meyer. "And I said, 'well as a matter of fact I did.' And he said 'well we've had several problems with people having rabbits eating through the wiring.'"

"We've seen rabbits and we've seen mice and they're eating up the newer cars," said Robert Bauguess, owner of Bavarian Autohaus. He said 2002 and newer models seem to be especially tasty.

Cars like Meyer's use a soy-based compound in the wiring.

Bauguess said a recent customer brought an unexpected passenger to the dealership along with her BMW. "There was a furry animal there and I poked at it, and it was a rabbit," said Bauguess.

Meyer says DIA admitted there are rabbits there --and everywhere else-- so they can't be sure their bunnies did the biting.

"We are aware of the problem," he said a woman from DIA told him on the phone, "And that they were thinking about increasing patrols. And I said 'to check out for bunnies?"

Bunnies clearly have not gotten the notice based on the number we saw around the parking lot.

"All I want to do is just to tell you there is a problem," Meyer said he told the woman, "Just to let you know that you might want to do something about it, and she said 'well, there is a fence.'"

"They made it in there. They found my car," Meyer said he told the woman at DIA, "The fence isn't working. And she said 'well, I don't know what to tell you,' and I said 'I just want to make sure that this is reported.'"

He says he never wanted reimbursement for repairs. "I ended up paying $238 plus $55 in parking," he said.

It was about five years ago FOX31 News reported on this same issue at DIA when several travelers had the same complaint.

DIA told FOX31 News they won't comment on the situation because there's no proof that rabbits at the airport did any damage to Meyer's car.

WalOne
16-10-2010, 07:20 AM
SJ, down here in upside land, we have a much more likeable - and airborne - pesky creature Here (http://www.nhc.net.nz/index/birds-new-zealand/kea/kea.htm) and Caught in the act (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OMLpPoOeays).

Our local rental car guys can usually see at a glance if their rentals have been anywhere near the South Island high country...

:D

Erayd
16-10-2010, 08:23 AM
They're smart too (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRW4ztbY8Ok) :D.

WalOne
16-10-2010, 09:15 AM
They're smart too

One bunny less.

Maybe we could sell our Keas off to the Denver Intl Airport to solve their bunny problem :devil

feersumendjinn
16-10-2010, 08:13 PM
I would think the problem would be more likely caused by rats, they like to chew on hard plastics and neoprene rubber (used on vacuum and fuel lines, must taste nice (they don't chew natural rubber, so brake hoses and tyres/tires are usually safe)), to keep their teeth worn down (they grow continuously).
In working in a dealership, I see lots of damage from rats.

I've even seen nests built on/in engine/under-bonnet/hood spaces from engine bay sound deadening (says something about the level/frequency of maintenance by the owner).

I suppose rabbits (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabbit) may be possible (being sort of rodents too), though less likely to climb into engine bays.

Rabbits have two sets of incisor teeth, one behind the other. This way they can be distinguished from rodents, with which they are often confused.[4] Carl Linnaeus originally grouped rabbits and rodents under the class Glires; later, they were separated as the predominant opinion was that many of their similarities were a result of convergent evolution. However, recent DNA analysis and the discovery of a common ancestor has supported the view that they share a common lineage, and thus rabbits and rodents are now often referred to together as members of the superclass Glires. [5]

BobM
17-10-2010, 05:24 PM
One bunny less.

Maybe we could sell our Keas off to the Denver Intl Airport to solve their bunny problem :devil

The only problem is that wasn't a ''bunny''. !! lol

Snorkbox
17-10-2010, 05:40 PM
In Australia they have Cockatoos that quite like removing Lead head nails from corrugated iron roofing.

WalOne
17-10-2010, 07:16 PM
The only problem is that wasn't a ''bunny''. !! lol

Huh? What was it then? :o

Erayd
17-10-2010, 07:29 PM
Huh? What was it then? :oBased purely on the fact it appeared to have wings, I'm going to take a wild stab in the dark and say it was some kind of avian creature :rolleyes:.

WalOne
17-10-2010, 07:55 PM
I've just looked at the clip frame by frame from about 2:11 onwards, and I can't make out any wings. Whatever it was, it's fluffy, and that was what made me think wabbit.

Anybody who can tell us what it is?

Erayd
17-10-2010, 09:31 PM
Anybody who can tell us what it is?It's definitely a bird (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4AWCvay6vj0).

Snorkbox
17-10-2010, 09:34 PM
My guess is a Muttonbird.

They do often live in burrows.

http://www.aatravel.co.nz/101/Regional101_Try-some-muttonbird--Titi-muttonbird-is-a-traditional-Maori-delicacy.html

Snorkbox
17-10-2010, 10:12 PM
Served on a plate which is the way I have seen them.

Normally bought and are very salty due to preservation.

I used to get one for 2/6d and then soak overnight in tap water. Cook lightly in cast iron frypan using a wipe of buttter as they are very oily.

Do not try them on a BBQ as they can catch fire.

prefect
17-10-2010, 10:56 PM
When the Germans in North Africa discovered muttonbird after attacking us they thought we where on the bones of our arse eating seabird.
What flavour is it?

WalOne
18-10-2010, 09:35 AM
My guess is a Muttonbird. They do often live in burrows.


Thanks guys, I can see now, it's a bird being dealt to by the Kea. But a question though, I've always thought Muttonbirds were coastal seabirds, and Keas, high country? :illogical

PS Eyrad, I like the links in your signature :thumbs:

BobM
18-10-2010, 10:19 AM
It was a Shearwater chick, commonly known as a Mutton bird. In the nesting season the keas will search for a unguarded nest, kill and eat the chick. Nature can be pretty cruel at times.!

Erayd
18-10-2010, 11:50 AM
PS Eyrad, I like the links in your signature :thumbs::D. Which one? My sig changes every 10 mins...

Snorkbox
18-10-2010, 12:33 PM
When the Germans in North Africa discovered muttonbird after attacking us they thought we where on the bones of our arse eating seabird.
What flavour is it?

Not to everyones' taste. Very oily and pongs the house out when being cooked.

WalOne
18-10-2010, 12:50 PM
:D. Which one? My sig changes every 10 mins...

I was referring mainly to the two links you provide - I like XKCD (I've bookmarked that). The poem "Footprints" appeals, being in synergy with my budding deist beliefs. Who wrote it, do you know? :)

Erayd
18-10-2010, 03:23 PM
The poem "Footprints" appeals, being in synergy with my budding deist beliefs. Who wrote it, do you know? :)As is happens, I wrote that one - I'm glad you like it :D.

:pf1mobmini:

WalOne
18-10-2010, 10:23 PM
As is happens, I wrote that one - I'm glad you like it :D.

:pf1mobmini:

:clap:clap:clap