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WalOne
15-10-2010, 09:34 AM
This Press Release from the Police Site:


Title: Deaf community gets 111 text service

Registrations open today for an emergency 111 text service for Deaf and hearing impaired people.

New Zealand Police has been working closely with Deaf Aotearoa New Zealand, the New Zealand Fire Service and St John for the past few months to develop the new service.

National Manager of the Police Communications Centres, Superintendent Andy McGregor, says the emergency 111 text service will considerably improve Deaf and hearing impaired people's access to the three emergency services.

"Until now, Deaf and hearing impaired people have relied on faxes or TTY
(teletypewriter) phones to contact emergency services. This technology is still in use, but it depends on the person being at home when the emergency happens.

"Deaf and hearing impaired people are big users of text, so we're delighted to be able to offer them a service that will put them on a par with the hearing population and better meet their needs."

In September, the three emergency services and Deaf Aotearoa held a series of meetings around the country with the Deaf and hearing impaired community to explain the 111 emergency text service.

"We got an enthusiastic reception. People have been waiting for this for quite a while," Superintendent McGregor says.

The system installed into the Police Communications Centres has been developed by IBM based on the Whispir Platform.

Police will receive and respond to all emergency texts on behalf of the New Zealand Fire Service and ambulance services. If it's a medical or fire emergency, Police will pass details electronically to the Fire Service or ambulance communications centres for dispatch.

The emergency text service is available only to the Deaf community and hearing impaired people who can't use a phone to call 111.

"The 111 text service is for Deaf and hearing impaired people who register with us.

"It's not an option for the general public, who should continue to call 111 if they have an emergency as speaking with callers remains the quickest way for us to get information," Superintendent McGregor says.

Police Minister Hon Judith Collins is launching the 111 text service at 11am today in the Police Northern Communications Centre in Auckland.

For more information from 1pm onwards, see www.police.govt.nz/deaf-txt

Renmoo
15-10-2010, 09:43 AM
Awesome :thumbs:

SoniKalien
15-10-2010, 09:51 AM
About time! Wohoo! :clap

CYaBro
15-10-2010, 01:25 PM
My sister helped get this up and running :D

WalOne
15-10-2010, 04:11 PM
My sister helped get this up and running :D

Well done, CYaSis. I wish I had a sister as useful :D

The Error Guy
15-10-2010, 07:15 PM
well, it doesn't help me (yet?) but this will be a big up for the hearing impaired.

Don't know what its like for them but this should be a help

gary67
15-10-2010, 07:33 PM
Being someone with a deaf nephew (born totally deaf) I can only say I just wish they had something similar in the UK to help him out

george12
15-10-2010, 07:44 PM
This is excellent, but they should work on making it available to everyone.

It has excellent uses for non-deaf people too, for example if someone had a stroke and found themselves unable to speak, or if someone wanted to keep quiet for some good reason.

TickTech
16-10-2010, 12:08 PM
Good idea, wonder how the deaf got by in the past?

Renmoo
16-10-2010, 12:32 PM
Good idea, wonder how the deaf got by in the past?

"Until now, Deaf and hearing impaired people have relied on faxes or TTY
(teletypewriter) phones to contact emergency services. This technology is still in use, but it depends on the person being at home when the emergency happens.
As per the article.

gary67
16-10-2010, 01:35 PM
This is excellent, but they should work on making it available to everyone.

It has excellent uses for non-deaf people too, for example if someone had a stroke and found themselves unable to speak, or if someone wanted to keep quiet for some good reason.

While it would be nice I can understand their position, currently there are around 7000 I think registered deaf people in NZ. So once they have logged their details they can use this service. Now remember that changing address, phone, cellphone numbers means updating the database. Not too big a job with 7000 people but if you start adding in another million then wow it's very hard to keep those details up to date

SoniKalien
16-10-2010, 01:40 PM
From what I understand the biggest issues is prank 111 txts hence it not being made available to the general public as an open service.

george12
16-10-2010, 03:21 PM
While it would be nice I can understand their position, currently there are around 7000 I think registered deaf people in NZ. So once they have logged their details they can use this service. Now remember that changing address, phone, cellphone numbers means updating the database. Not too big a job with 7000 people but if you start adding in another million then wow it's very hard to keep those details up to date

The texter could text the address though. Just like in a normal 111 call, where you give them your address.