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View Full Version : Another Free Wood Day



SurferJoe46
12-09-2010, 06:02 PM
This time with a video of me gassing up and adding bar oil to the chainsaw for the next cuts after lunch.

YOUTUBE VID HERE (http://www.youtube.com/user/SurferJoe46?feature=mhum#p/a/u/0/Xa7s1xfV1vI)

Here I had a tight chain:: YOUTUBE LINK (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLUMrn7MzIM)

Some more pixs of the day. PICASA LINK HERE. (http://picasaweb.google.com/vreeland.joe/WoodTrip002?feat=directlink)

Look like I'll have more than enough wood for the Winter now what with what I got left over and got in the past two weekend journeys.

Photographer is my step-son David.

qazwsxokmijn
12-09-2010, 06:18 PM
Some nice scenery there Joe.

roddy_boy
12-09-2010, 06:38 PM
No chaps, no helmet, no earmuffs? Also, putting your foot under a log you're sawing while kneeling? You need to take Chainsawing 101 imo.

Also, get one of these (http://images.google.co.nz/imgres?imgurl=http://www.mister-solutions.co.uk/ekmps/shops/holtham/images/oregon-chainsaw-oil-fuel-petrol-combi-can-%255B2%255D-19591-p.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.mister-solutions.co.uk/oregon-chainsaw-oil--fuel--petrol-combi-can-19591-p.asp&usg=__TqtR200MkGp2vl2s_L-OR15uBto=&h=714&w=800&sz=148&hl=en&start=0&sig2=cTX8zGlE2nBfAGXwlOwFQw&zoom=1&tbnid=kdvbtqgUbNCPqM:&tbnh=151&tbnw=164&ei=cGaMTLOsBYb6sAOD_MmfBA&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dpetrol%2Bcontainer%2Bwith%2Boil%26um% 3D1%26hl%3Den%26safe%3Doff%26biw%3D1280%26bih%3D61 4%26tbs%3Disch:10%2C114&um=1&itbs=1&iact=hc&vpx=133&vpy=128&dur=3334&hovh=212&hovw=238&tx=123&ty=109&oei=cGaMTLOsBYb6sAOD_MmfBA&esq=1&page=1&ndsp=18&ved=1t:429,r:6,s:0&biw=1280&bih=614).

kahawai chaser
12-09-2010, 08:13 PM
Nice pics SJ in Picassa. I have not really touched a chain saw for over 25 years, when I was in Kaingaroa Forest (http://www.kaingaroatimberlands.co.nz/forest.htm) doing a bit of summer work with a few Uncles of mine. The trees were Pinus Radiata, and I think the pine forest was the largest in the world back then. A Canadian firm Crown - Zeller (something) brought shares later (I think), and with another major Forest company: NZFP - New Zealand Forest Products. Later on I got involved in Pulp and Paper engineering/mechanical testing. Back then it was all about trees/wood/pulp/paperboard as a major export product, earner, and employer for NZ.

The pics remind me when I was in Kaingaroa in the mid - late 70's (and sweating hard). But we had a local lake for a dip - Lake "Rerewhakaaitu" (http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/places-to-visit/bay-of-plenty/rotorua-lakes/lake-rerewhakaaitu-recreational-reserves/) (don't know what the maori translation is - but it's tricky to pronounce for some; but now a doc wildlife reserve). It's situated south of the more popular and tourist based Rotorua lakes. (http://www.rotoruanz.com/rotorua/info/lakes.php)

But now only contractors are on call (I think), as the entire work force were laid off about 1982. What trees are those in the pics? What's the cc rating and the brand of the chainsaw? Did you use a winch (e.g. the US Warn Winch), What's the name of your local lake? Had to ask - just reminds me so much being in a forest back then...

But don't know if we can go chop up a tree over here, without some sort of permit or permission...

gary67
12-09-2010, 08:33 PM
Nice pics Joe

SP8's
12-09-2010, 09:29 PM
Free things from the government maybe ...... but you don't actually say whether the government know you're taking these things Joe :devil

zqwerty
12-09-2010, 10:22 PM
Of course it's totally legit surely you know SurferJoe by now, see here:

http://pressf1.pcworld.co.nz/showthread.php?t=112239

bob_doe_nz
13-09-2010, 12:40 AM
All this before lunch too.
So it was morning wood? (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morning_wood) :rolleyes:

roddy_boy
13-09-2010, 02:06 AM
So it was morning wood? (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morning_wood) :rolleyes:

[This article is a stub]

Lol.

SurferJoe46
13-09-2010, 04:12 AM
Nice pics SJ in Picassa. I have not really touched a chain saw for over 25 years, when I was in Kaingaroa Forest (http://www.kaingaroatimberlands.co.nz/forest.htm) doing a bit of summer work with a few Uncles of mine. The trees were Pinus Radiata, and I think the pine forest was the largest in the world back then. A Canadian firm Crown - Zeller (something) brought shares later (I think), and with another major Forest company: NZFP - New Zealand Forest Products. Later on I got involved in Pulp and Paper engineering/mechanical testing. Back then it was all about trees/wood/pulp/paperboard as a major export product, earner, and employer for NZ.

The pics remind me when I was in Kaingaroa in the mid - late 70's (and sweating hard). But we had a local lake for a dip - Lake "Rerewhakaaitu" (http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/places-to-visit/bay-of-plenty/rotorua-lakes/lake-rerewhakaaitu-recreational-reserves/) (don't know what the maori translation is - but it's tricky to pronounce for some; but now a doc wildlife reserve). It's situated south of the more popular and tourist based Rotorua lakes. (http://www.rotoruanz.com/rotorua/info/lakes.php)

But now only contractors are on call (I think), as the entire work force were laid off about 1982. What trees are those in the pics? What's the cc rating and the brand of the chainsaw? Did you use a winch (e.g. the US Warn Winch), What's the name of your local lake? Had to ask - just reminds me so much being in a forest back then...

But don't know if we can go chop up a tree over here, without some sort of permit or permission...

The US Forest Service sets some 'free days' for people who want to take wood for their own use like heating or cooking - for the year.

As such, we took advantage of the law and got seven cords of wood for three families - mine, Dodge, and Jones.

Actually the Forest Service is the licensing agency and you can get a permit for tree taking all year long for about $20.00. It has several punch card areas on it and when you use them up, you can buy another punch card.

These past three weekends were, however, free and open to anyone without fee.

The actual fee is pretty nominal, and there's always a ranger on hand to help and direct (but not cut your wood) for you.

The trees that are take-able are marked with USFS blue paint and even the paint has some sort of micro-coding in it and if the blue paint on the tree isn't official, they will know it fast under special light.

We weren't subject to this inspection since we took only 'downers' and didn't have to fell a whole tree. I didn't bring my big saws anyway if I had to.

There are legal sizes of trees that can be cut - especially by type-of-tree. The White Firs can only be less than 18 inches in trunk diameter, measured one foot from the dirt. Even if they are diseased,- if they are over that size - the "Tree People" won't let them be taken. The USFS says that is a stupid rule, but the Tree People hold great sway here like most arcane liberals.

I don't believe that there is any commercial foresting for large companies in these mountains, although the privateers like ourselves, could never thin the forest as much as the agencies would like - so there's always a lot of 'drop-wood' for the taking nd that's up for grabs all the time, no fee.

There IS an active gold mine in the area though and we had to drive past it to the take-area.

The nearest lake is Lake Hemet, which is just to the North of our cutting zone, and although we never went into it it was there.

I was going to use the winch to take a really big 'downer' from a deep ravine, but we had a lot easier pickings. I keep a Warn Winch on the front of my Blazer for just that reason and several hundred feet of logging chain too.

Most of the saws I used these days were Homelite or Huskies. Used mostly were 22", 20" and a cute little "Barbie's Play Day" Poulon 12" for shingling.



Free things from the government maybe ...... but you don't actually say whether the government know you're taking these things Joe :devil

Yeah - it's all permitted and controlled. There is always a forest ranger present, although he may not be in our vicinity at all times. We always drove up to his station and let him know we were in the area before we cut anything.

Google Maps Co-ordinates: http://maps.google.com/maps?ll=33.616073,-116.66997&z=14&t=h&hl=en



Interesting - we saw a mountain lion on the way home and she just trotted in front of us for about 100 yards, ignoring - but I am sure aware of - the cars behind her. She finally bounded into the woods and disappeared.

Now comes da fun part: re-cutting (shortening) and splitting the wood.

The wood we took was:

White Fir (http://homepage.mac.com/patholleran/ParkVision/Lassen/lv-041.jpg)
Douglas Fir (http://www.christmastreelocations.com/images/douglasfir.jpg)
Jeffrey Pine (http://www.travelblog.org/Photos/1775664)
This view is looking from about our front door to Thomas Mountain, were we we taking trees : http://www.panoramio.com/photo/6867721

NZMacka
13-09-2010, 09:15 AM
Nice post SJ - thanks for sharing. Your North American forests are interstingly different to the NZ ones that I work in! :)

kahawai chaser
13-09-2010, 11:12 AM
Thanks for info SJ, at one time NZ had a "wall of wood", making it difficult to export in it's raw state. But maybe NZ forestry companies should have had a scheme similar to the US, for tree taking. But shareholder driven, and thus special wood processing plant/techniques were developed/enhanced (e.g. CHH Wood Products (http://www.chhwoodproducts.co.nz/)) to transform the excess wood, and of which International Paper from the US become a major player here in NZ.

Your San Bernadino map is from California? But yet your home pics are in Winconsin? You also traveled between the two to get wood?

SurferJoe46
13-09-2010, 02:02 PM
Your San Bernadino map is from California? But yet your home pics are in Winconsin? You also traveled between the two to get wood?

Ahem!

San Bernardino is both a county and a city - but they are both quite a distance from me here in Riverside County - in the city of Anza. (Riverside County also has a city by the same name just to make it more confusing)

The San Bernardino Mountains, however cross a few different counties, including Riverside and San Bernardino. I also believe they cross LA and possibly go into Ventura Counties too - but that is just a guess for me at the mo.

So - I don't live in Wisconsin, but there were some pixs of trees that I pulled from general tree pixs and they might have been in Wisconsin.

Expanding outward from my front porch I live an IN Anza, IN the County of Riverside, IN the State of California and you know the rest.

I am also IN the San Bernardino Mountains, although the city/county of that same name are somewhat distant to me here.

The actual tree'd areas here around me where I live are not indicative of the vast forests in the US as a whole and are really quite small in size and trivial in nature.

The whole Northwest US is crawling in trees if the Chinese and the Koreans haven't dropped them all and hauled them to their countries and made inferior wood products out of them and sent them here as furniture, OSB and plywood.

Typically our coniferous trees start good growth at about 5,500 feet above sea level, although they can be enticed to grow at lower altitudes. At that height, the deciduous trees start thinning out and they are mostly non-existent above 6,000 feet.

Where we were cutting those pines, we still had Live- Black- Red and Scrub-Oaks all around us, although the Scrub-Oaks were getting pretty thin.

Manzanita and Red Shank were also almost gone at that altitude too, but they prosper here around me.

I'll take- and post some pixs of them in a bit.

.

SurferJoe46
13-09-2010, 03:05 PM
OK - I've created a new Picasa album of pixs just around my yard and out to the driveway and around the circle of the property here.

There are a lot of different trees and some desert foliage like YUCCA and other succulents like Mickey-Mouse Cactus and some sage.

The season is changing and the trees are (many of them, anyway) in Fall colors and they are losing their leaves for the onset of our cold season.

The leaves are really hitting the ground now and covering everything. My Koi ponds are filling up too and I've gotta net them out all the time. One of the ponds I'm not showing as it has a screen over it to keep frogs out that were eating my Koi babies.

The fruit trees are ALMOST ready to harvest and I've got to do so before the first real frost. We were at 42ºF (@4.5ºC) yesterday morning and although today got to 100ºF (human core-temperature) it will get cooler every night from now on. Snow is not expected until November if the Mexican Express doesn't blow hot air up through the Baja.

We've got two different kinds of pears, about six kinds of apples and some almonds and grapes - although I never had time to work on the grape vines so they won't produce well if at all.

I just walked around the property expecting to find a tarantula to show you, but I think they've all found their women for the season and either were eaten or killed by their mates - or they got their women taken away by a Tarantula Hawk - which is a giant wasp that can actually fly off with a fairly good-sized spider to lay it's eggs in it's abdomen and use the spider for food for the hatching baby hawks. This I have seen a few times.


The Tarantula hawk is relatively docile and rarely stings without provocation.

However the sting, particularly of Pepsis formosa, is among the most painful of any insect, but the intense pain only lasts for about 3 minutes.

Commenting on his own experience, one researcher described the pain as "…immediate, excruciating pain that simply shuts down one's ability to do anything, except, perhaps, scream.

Mental discipline simply does not work in these situations." In terms of scale, the wasp's sting is rated near the top of the Schmidt Sting Pain Index, second only to that of the bullet ant and is described by Schmidt as "blinding, fierce [and] shockingly electric".

Because of their extremely large stingers, very few animals are able to eat them; one of the few animals that can is the roadrunner.

Beep Beep!

Enjoy. I can take a 'walkabout' video if you like when the sun comes back up. Youse guys get the sun now - treat it nicely, I want it back!


Here's the link to the Picasa Album ::: LINK HERE (http://picasaweb.google.com/vreeland.joe/AroundHome002?feat=directlink)

faith1806
13-09-2010, 03:16 PM
yeah, i agree with you, and thanks for SurferJoe46's nice job.

kahawai chaser
13-09-2010, 03:20 PM
Ahem!

San Bernardino is both a county and a city - but they are both quite a distance from me here in Riverside County - in the city of Anza. (Riverside County also has a city by the same name just to make it more confusing)

The San Bernardino Mountains, however cross a few different counties, including Riverside and San Bernardino. I also believe they cross LA and possibly go into Ventura Counties too - but that is just a guess for me at the mo.

So - I don't live in Wisconsin, but there were some pixs of trees that I pulled from general tree pixs and they might have been in Wisconsin.

Expanding outward from my front porch I live an IN Anza, IN the County of Riverside, IN the State of California and you know the rest.

I am also IN the San Bernardino Mountains, although the city/county of that same name are somewhat distant to me here.

The actual tree'd areas here around me where I live are not indicative of the vast forests in the US as a whole and are really quite small in size and trivial in nature.

The whole Northwest US is crawling in trees if the Chinese and the Koreans haven't dropped them all and hauled them to their countries and made inferior wood products out of them and sent them here as furniture, OSB and plywood.

Typically our coniferous trees start good growth at about 5,500 feet above sea level, although they can be enticed to grow at lower altitudes. At that height, the deciduous trees start thinning out and they are mostly non-existent above 6,000 feet.

Where we were cutting those pines, we still had Live- Black- Red and Scrub-Oaks all around us, although the Scrub-Oaks were getting pretty thin.

Manzanita and Red Shank were also almost gone at that altitude too, but they prosper here around me.

I'll take- and post some pixs of them in a bit.

.

OK - Makes sense, I forgot about Counties, which can be huge, compared to regions here in NZ. The only County I remember, was "Cade's" County, a popular TV show in the early 70's with Glen Ford, which look similar in your pics. I also remember a US Forestry CEO from IP telling me, that he reckons that some of their County/Metro areas are about half the size of our North Island...

lakewoodlady
13-09-2010, 07:28 PM
Woo hoo! Love watchin' a man with a chainsaw! (except in Texas)

LL :banana

SurferJoe46
13-09-2010, 07:31 PM
Woo hoo! Love watchin' a man with a chainsaw! (except in Texas)

LL :banana

Next time I'll sweat a little more for ya!

I actually take it pretty easy and let the younger guys take all the really heavy weight work. I just zoom in for the kill on logs that I can easily reach and cut.

I'm old - and I know how to use it.