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nofam
10-09-2010, 07:26 PM
I'm after a monitor for a 21st present (so money isn't too much of an object within reason). It's going to be used largely for graphic design (not professionally), and watching the odd movie. Is it worth considering an IPS screen?

It doesn't need speakers either.

Was looking as something like this. (http://www.computerlounge.co.nz/components/componentview.asp?partid=12964) Seems pretty reasonable for an IPS panel?

All advice gratefully received!!

robbyp
10-09-2010, 08:59 PM
I'm after a monitor for a 21st present (so money isn't too much of an object within reason). It's going to be used largely for graphic design (not professionally), and watching the odd movie. Is it worth considering an IPS screen?

It doesn't need speakers either.

Was looking as something like this. (http://www.computerlounge.co.nz/components/componentview.asp?partid=12964) Seems pretty reasonable for an IPS panel?

All advice gratefully received!!


YOu may want to look at LED backlit ones. The Dell ultrasharp montiors are some of the best. Also 1920x1200 is a better resolution than 1980x1080 for computer useage, however many of the cheap ones today are just 1980x1080

Agent_24
11-09-2010, 01:51 AM
LED backlights should also last longer than CCFLs

utopian201
11-09-2010, 10:03 AM
I'm not aware of any LED IPS panels.

That is quite a good price for an IPS panel. Others you could consider is HP ZR24W, but it might not be as cheap as the viewsonic, but it is 16:10. I prefer 16:10, other people prefer 16:9.

Copied from a previous post:
You can check which panel a certain screen has here:
http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/panelsearch.htm
The main LCD panel types are:
TN: Lowest cost, worst viewing angles and colour reproduction, low image processing lag. Apparently best for fast paced gaming, worst for image editing and professsional work where colour accuracy is important. TN panels can only display 262k colours natively and use dithering to display 16.7m.

*VA (MVA, PVA, S-PVA): Middle of the road, better viewing angles and colour reproduction, typically high image processing lag (as high as 64ms!). Typically best black levels and contrast. Can display 16.7m colours but unfortunately (or fortunately if you're a design professional) most newer panels of this type are wide gamut, meaning sRGB images are oversaturated in non colour managed applications. Can suffer from slight horizontal contrast shift (like TN's vertical contrast shift, but not as obvious)

IPS (S-IPS, H-IPS): Most expensive technology, viewing angles and colour reproduction almost as good as (or even better than) that of a CRT, medium image processing (between 20-40ms). Almost all are wide gamut (which is a disadvantage, or an advantage depending on how you look at it). No contrast shift.

All panel types have similar response times so ghosting is not really a problem anymore. Although some panels use overdrive, so you get a 'negative' ghosting effect, depending on the background eg on the TN (viewsonic 22") I'm using now, there is a slight ghosting trail, which isn't noticable on my IPS screen. So in this instance, TN has worse ghosting than IPS, even though the TN has a "quicker" documented (5ms for TN, 6ms for IPS) response time.

DeSade
11-09-2010, 10:47 AM
I cannot recommend this monitor enough, its bloody awesome, I have two of them seriously considering a third.

http://tinyurl.com/aw2310monitor

Nomad
11-09-2010, 11:02 AM
I got the 24" Dell Ultrasharp v good, good warranty too, 24hr courier to your door replacement. $1100-1200 now.

You could get Eizo or Lacie up to $8k :p

These 3 are wider gamut for graphics. Not so for games. Games may want faster response and more vivid colors and brighter which tend to be be the opposite for graphics.

Agent_24
11-09-2010, 11:46 AM
For gaming, I like my CRT.

No image lag, good colours, very good blacks and cheap!

I don't think I've found any LCD which I can game on and enjoy it. The monitor DeSade mentioned might be great but that costs too much for me...

Nomad
11-09-2010, 11:51 AM
For graphics even the Dell's IPS screens are too bright. Pro's tend to calibrate them which reduce the brightness. I have a cheaper calibrator which does not measure luminance which I have to tone down the default's 50 to 30. Or the prints don't match the screen.

Some pro's still use CRT but few, due to the viewing angles and being less bright.

utopian201
12-09-2010, 12:28 PM
For graphics even the Dell's IPS screens are too bright. Pro's tend to calibrate them which reduce the brightness. I have a cheaper calibrator which does not measure luminance which I have to tone down the default's 50 to 30. Or the prints don't match the screen.

Some pro's still use CRT but few, due to the viewing angles and being less bright.

Can't you just reduce the brightness? That has been a standard feature on every monitor I have used so far, LCD and CRT....
The default values are wildly inaccurate, but you can get more accurate RGB +brightness/contrast settings off tftcentral.co.uk for your model of monitor. Of course each monitor is different, but it is a starting point.

I still keep a CRT for some games (eg FPS).

Nomad
13-09-2010, 08:33 AM
Can't you just reduce the brightness? That has been a standard feature on every monitor I have used so far, LCD and CRT....
The default values are wildly inaccurate, but you can get more accurate RGB +brightness/contrast settings off tftcentral.co.uk for your model of monitor. Of course each monitor is different, but it is a starting point.

I still keep a CRT for some games (eg FPS).

The brightness adjustment on the LCD itself is what I use. On my monitor I did it via trial and error, so I reduced 50 default (brightness control) to 30 on my LCD sample then I recalibrate using a monitor calibrator hardware device. The calibrator will correct more things ..... incl color accurateness.

Ps. I don't reduce the brightness control on the ATI utility b/c that can counter correct calibration settings. Also what happens with some calibrators is that they disable the ATI settings and reuse whatever calibrator settings. So if you have a chepaer one that does not do luminance, even if you had reduce the brightness using ATI utility, it will disable the ATI settings, revert back to factory default and then use the calibrators own settings it sussed out when you calibrated your monitor. So what you may find is that the screen will be brighter than what is correct. So if you have a cheaper calibrator adjusting the brightness control on the LCD's physical buttons is the only way I know that works.

However if you really want to you can go into the ATI device and drop the brightness down but as I said reducing brightness in ATI and not recalibrating can produce effects no matter how small. The thing is that if you do that, every time you start up your computer you have to open up ATI and activate the settings because every time you start up, the monitor calibrator software may disable ATI settings unless you activate them by running it. I know that Colorvision software will do this.

I have tried a friend's more expensive one and that does luminace as well so you don't have to adjust the LCD's controls at all.... $500-600 however vs a $200-300 unit (NZD).


Many monitors incl the Dell IPS retailing at $1,200 do not have RGB settings .... :(
If ya going to do RGB stuff, even if you could on yours, your better to use a hardware device so it's less room for guess work with your own subjective eyes.

autechre
13-09-2010, 10:31 AM
I got the 24" Dell Ultrasharp v good, good warranty too, 24hr courier to your door replacement. $1100-1200 now.
These are fantastic screens. Got mine for $700 when they had a sale on.

The HP IPS screen mentioned is also apparently very good - and more reasonably priced :)