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xyz823
05-09-2010, 06:00 PM
Looking at buying a second hand iPhone, should I fork out the extra $$$ for a 3GS?

GameJunkie
05-09-2010, 07:24 PM
3GS

johcar
05-09-2010, 07:25 PM
Hell yes!

Even better, buy a proper phone and get a Nexus One - they're cheaper, as well as better specced.

psycik
05-09-2010, 07:45 PM
Depending on the cost of the 2nd hand one, but the brand new 3gs GB is $899 from apple.

Chilling_Silence
05-09-2010, 08:01 PM
Yes, most definitely. The speed difference is huge.

Better still, get a Nexus One ;)

xyz823
05-09-2010, 08:14 PM
Yes, most definitely. The speed difference is huge.

Better still, get a Nexus One ;)

Looking at getting at combing my phone and ipod together. What is the music player like on nexus one?

Also, seems like a 16GB 3G goes for around $450-$500 on trademe. Cheapest 8GB 3GS is at $655 atm. Although I have just seen some 16GB models going for $630+.

Selling my phone for around $250, ipod nano for $110 and ipod touch has sold for $210 so I have $500-$550 to spend. Could save for a few weeks though, but saving for tv/ps3!!

How big is huge? because my current iPod touch speed seems fine to me and I think it has the same CPU as iphone 3G?? (Its the 8GB 3rd gen one) Like is it a 1-2sec difference when opening apps or a really noticeable 5-10s difference? Will it be worth the extra $100 or so?

lagbort
05-09-2010, 08:47 PM
on an unusually non-harmonious note, buy a 3gs over a nexus one.

I have had a 3gs since last september and decided that instead of upgrading to an iPhone4 I would give the android route a shot and got a nexus one.

1.5 months on i have now sold my nexus one and gone back to my 3gs until vodafone decide to let people buy the iPhone 4 outright without re-signing a contract.

the nexus one felt generally slower with noticeable lag when opening apps ( even with memory cleared ) its loss of signal issue is even more noticeable than the iPhone 4's with any touches to the lower section resulting in a loss of signal. the touch screen is no-where near as accurate or responsive as the iPhone's and the battery life is abysmal comparatively.

having said that I am no apple fanboy and i do wish the iPhone was a more open platform it is just that for the time being the iPhone system ( iOS and the hardware combined ) is a far superior system for normal use than android.

Metla
05-09-2010, 09:43 PM
Speaking of iphones.

Just plugged mine into itunes for the first time in many months, and the piece of crap wiped my damn phone and put on a back up from 6 months ago.

All my photos.....gone
My email account.....gone
All my emails......gone

And no doubt my contacts have been erased and replaced.

What a total ******** of a phone.

If my texts have been erased and replaced I'm going to spew.

GameJunkie
05-09-2010, 09:45 PM
http://www.engadget.com/2009/06/08/iphone-3g-vs-iphone-3g-s-the-tale-of-the-tape/

Erayd
05-09-2010, 11:03 PM
...the nexus one felt generally slower with noticeable lag when opening apps ( even with memory cleared )...Out of interest, were you running a task killer of some description? I can't say mine has ever felt laggy - my experience of the N1 has been that the performance is substantially better than an iPhone 3GS, and noting your comment of 'even with the memory cleared', I have a sneaky suspicion that your problems were self-inflicted.

Note that running task killers on Android is almost always a *very* bad idea, and will, among other things, cause your system to feel sluggish, use more battery, make inefficient use of available ram, and kill off tasks that aren't supposed to be killed. Let the OS manage system resources; that's what it's there for, and it does a good job.

It's also worth pointing out that Android 2.2 (FroYo) gave it a huge speed boost as compared to 2.1 (Eclair), due to the addition of a JIT compiler.


...the touch screen is no-where near as accurate or responsive as the iPhone's...Compared to a 2nd-gen iPod touch, I found the touch's digitizer slightly better, but they're both very good - no problems with accuracy or responsiveness from either device. The N1 does occasionally lose calibration if the screen undergoes a large temperature change, but briefly switching the screen off / on sorts it.


...its loss of signal issue is even more noticeable than the iPhone 4's with any touches to the lower section resulting in a loss of signal...I haven't had a chance to field-test an iPhone 4, but I find my N1 holds a signal substantially better than both my old Samsung flip-phone (M510, Telecom CDMA) and a Sharp GX-10 (Vodafone). Coverage area seems to be slightly better than the GX-10. Cupping the bottom of the phone does sometimes decrease the available signal a little bit (between 0 & 10 dBm, depending on location), but not enough to affect performance. It will reliably hold a connection for both calls and data, on both GSM, EDGE, and WCDMA, all the way down to -113dBm.

I don't know how the iPhone 4 would fare under those signal conditions, but my guess is that due to the antenna design it will have slightly better coverage than the N1, but at the expense of a significantly larger signal drop if you hold it the wrong way.


...and the battery life is abysmal comparatively...Definitely haven't found this - my N1 seems to get fairly similar battery life to an iPhone 3GS. Once again, this makes me suspicious you were running a task killer...

I've owned my N1 since the beginning of March, and would choose it over an iPhone anyday - in my personal opinion it leaves the iPhone for dead - but it's definitely a matter of preference. Android and iOS have very different philosophies governing their design and limitations, and as such there's a huge difference between the two platforms.

Darkstar09: No contest, the 3GS is a much better phone than the 3G. If you must get an iPhone, go for the 3GS.

lagbort
06-09-2010, 08:48 AM
Out of interest, were you running a task killer of some description? I can't say mine has ever felt laggy - my experience of the N1 has been that the performance is substantially better than an iPhone 3GS, and noting your comment of 'even with the memory cleared', I have a sneaky suspicion that your problems were self-inflicted.

was running a task killer when I first got the phone on the advice of people on the nexus one forums but stopped using it after a couple of weeks or so due to sheer laziness.

when I said memory cleared i was meaning manually closing unnecessary programs in the native android application manager.



It's also worth pointing out that Android 2.2 (FroYo) gave it a huge speed boost as compared to 2.1 (Eclair), due to the addition of a JIT compiler.
[QUOTE]
I was running 2.2 and noticed very little if any improvement from 2.1 to 2.2

[QUOTE=Erayd;947199]
Compared to a 2nd-gen iPod touch, I found the touch's digitizer slightly better, but they're both very good - no problems with accuracy or responsiveness from either device. The N1 does occasionally lose calibration if the screen undergoes a large temperature change, but briefly switching the screen off / on sorts it.


I found the nexus would always hit the button next to the one I was aiming for, maybe with enough time I could have gotten used to it, but what really annoyed me is when it was charging the bottom 2cm of the touch screen simply did not work and the rest of the screen would register hits almost as far away as possible from where I actually hit it.



I haven't had a chance to field-test an iPhone 4, but I find my N1 holds a signal substantially better than both my old Samsung flip-phone (M510, Telecom CDMA) and a Sharp GX-10 (Vodafone). Coverage area seems to be slightly better than the GX-10. Cupping the bottom of the phone does sometimes decrease the available signal a little bit (between 0 & 10 dBm, depending on location), but not enough to affect performance. It will reliably hold a connection for both calls and data, on both GSM, EDGE, and WCDMA, all the way down to -113dBm.

I don't know how the iPhone 4 would fare under those signal conditions, but my guess is that due to the antenna design it will have slightly better coverage than the N1, but at the expense of a significantly larger signal drop if you hold it the wrong way.

with my N1 and the one my friend bought any touches to the bottom brown plastic section on the back would cause an immediate drop of 4 or 5 bars of signal.

Also the n1 would randomly stop talking to the 3g network leaving me unable to use any internet until I cycled the connection by turning airplane mode on and off.



Definitely haven't found this - my N1 seems to get fairly similar battery life to an iPhone 3GS. Once again, this makes me suspicious you were running a task killer...


I get 2 days of fairly heavy usage from the iPhone and I got maybe 1 day if I was lucky from the N1, without a task killer.



I've owned my N1 since the beginning of March, and would choose it over an iPhone anyday - in my personal opinion it leaves the iPhone for dead - but it's definitely a matter of preference. Android and iOS have very different philosophies governing their design and limitations, and as such there's a huge difference between the two platforms.


Don;t get me wrong I would love a good android phone, but I believe the platform still has a fair ways to go to become as user friendly as iOS, and that task is only made more difficult due to its use across multiple phones.
That is one reason I bought the N1 over any other Android phone, since it is the 'reference' android phone it should have the best possible android experience.

Chilling_Silence
06-09-2010, 10:42 AM
I'm with Erayd on this one.

No issues, and the battery life was significantly longer than the 3G and 3GS. Borrowed a near-new 3GS for a week, got a solid day from it, but that's all. I use my phone *lots*. iPhone 3G would last me until 4PM usually before getting to 10%, or even dying. Didn't ever have bluetooth on for the iPhones, it would kill the battery so much faster it was amazingly terrible.

N1 will last me all day, even if I stream music via bluetooth for a few hours, and I'll get to 5PM and still have ~40% left easy.

I can't comment on signal dropping entirely, it's been brilliant for me, and I always hold the brown part at the bottom of the phone? How else are you supposed to hold the device?

Here's an example of the speed differences:
In my left hand (I'm right-handed, so it's going to be slower and more un-coordinated) I held my new N1 just 5-6 hours after I'd got it. In my right hand, I held my iPhone 3G which I'd had for just on 2 years, and was very familiar with. Both were powered off, powered back on on, screen off, with a 4-digit passcode to unlock.

Starting at the same time, I fired both up, one in each hand.
On the N1 I unlocked the phone, loaded up the market, searched for Bump, selected the result, told it to install the app, waited while it downloaded, it installed, I loaded up the app.
On the iPhone 3G, I unlocked the phone, tapped on the App Store icon, and waited.

The N1 was finished installing Bump and the app was running before my 3G had even loaded the App Store..

Now that's a speed difference ;)

johcar
06-09-2010, 12:13 PM
<snip>

Also the n1 would randomly stop talking to the 3g network leaving me unable to use any internet until I cycled the connection by turning airplane mode on and off.
<snip>

Would my assumption that you are/were with VF when the 3G dropouts were occurring with your phone be correct?

A colleague has just 'upgraded' to an iPhone4 (on VF) - I'm currently running a 3GS (on XT) while I'm waiting for my N1 to arrive. When he is sitting beside me on the 15th floor of an Auckland central city building, he gets between 2 and 4 bars, and 3G comes and goes.... I get 5 bars with 3G (since XT is ONLY 3G) on my 3GS.

It may not have been the phone's fault - it might be the carrier you are with.

Chilling_Silence
06-09-2010, 01:58 PM
Ah gotta love XT :D

Also, keep in mind that there are the two different versions of the N1, designed for the two different networks!

Erayd
06-09-2010, 10:57 PM
...when I said memory cleared i was meaning manually closing unnecessary programs in the native android application manager...That's almost as bad. Unless something has crashed, it's generally a good idea to leave that kind of thing alone - the OS will kill them if necessary.

I must say, going by your posts in this thread, I wonder if you had some faulty hardware. I know quite a few people with N1 phones, and to the best of my knowledge none of them have experienced the issues you've been describing.