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mark c
04-09-2010, 11:25 PM
Hi do you suppose that watching the box on mute would save on the power bill?
The plot in most fiction programs doesn't really matter, it's the pretty pictures that does it, and as for the docos, well, the same.
Just wondering if there are TV techs out there who might be able to inform on this.
Cheers, m

Cato
04-09-2010, 11:28 PM
Nope.

mark c
04-09-2010, 11:31 PM
Darn.

mark c
04-09-2010, 11:47 PM
On 2nd thoughts are you sure about that? Surely if you've got less rather than more volume is like less rather than more, say, lights on in the house. therefore a difference in power consumption. If not, in regard to the TV, with it muted and it uses the same power, then where does the energy go?

Cato
04-09-2010, 11:57 PM
On 2nd thoughts are you sure about that? Surely if you've got less rather than more volume is like less rather than more, say, lights on in the house. therefore a difference in power consumption. If not, in regard to the TV, with it muted and it uses the same power, then where does the energy go?

Sure, you will get a saving, but the saving will be miniscule. A TV these days uses about 120w. The highest end TVs will at best have 10W or 20W speakers. You'll have to mute your TV for 50 hours to save about $0.20.

You would be an idiot to do that.

mark c
05-09-2010, 12:00 AM
Thanks Cato that's what I wanted to know.
Cheers,
Power Saving Idiot.

Cato
05-09-2010, 12:09 AM
One thing though, washers & dryers use extream amounts of power.


Toaster : 800-1500W
Microwave : 600-1500W
Dishwasher : 1200-1500W
Washing Machine : 500W
Vacuum Cleaner : 200-700W
Iron : 1000W
Electric Mower : 1500W
Clothes dryer : 4000W
Ceiling Fan : 10-50W
Table Fan : 10-25W
Electric Blanket : 200W
Hair Blow dryer : 1000W
Electric Shaver : 15W
Laptop Computer : 20-50W
Desktop Computer : 80-150W
TV (19" colour) : 70W
Clock radio : 1W
9" disc sander : 1200W
3" belt sander : 1000W
Fridge / Freezer : 500W
25" colour TV : 150W
Electric Kettle : 2000W
Power Shower : 240W

Also, CRTs will use way more power than LCDs.

mark c
05-09-2010, 12:25 AM
Oh excellent thanks you v much. Sun and wind does the clothes drying for me. Otherwise I am a v low consumer, about 35$ a month for the power bill. The Q about the the TV was I admit a bit capricious, more a stab at the pap, twaddle & schlock on the box really, but I do appreciate your replies and info.
Cheers, m

pctek
05-09-2010, 08:30 AM
One thing though, washers & dryers use extream amounts of power.



Also, CRTs will use way more power than LCDs.

A 32" or 37" LCD you might save some money but as with most people who switch to LCD any energy saving is off-set by the larger screen size. A 46" Samsung for instance uses 260W whereas a 36" Philips CRT uses around 100 and 150W depending on the model.

gary67
05-09-2010, 10:26 AM
Leaving the wall switch in the up position is the best cost saving measure you can achieve

Cato
05-09-2010, 11:28 AM
A 32" or 37" LCD you might save some money but as with most people who switch to LCD any energy saving is off-set by the larger screen size. A 46" Samsung for instance uses 260W whereas a 36" Philips CRT uses around 100 and 150W depending on the model.

Not really, things are getting really good these days.

http://www.sony.co.nz/product/kdl-46nx700
129W for a 46" ain't bad at all. Plasma TVs are as bad as CRTs, and they'll use more than double of what a current LCD would use. Backlid LCDs tend to use about 60-70% of normal LCDs.

gary67, totally agree, but the best thing of all is to save some $ and not buy a TV in the first place, nothing good on tele these days anyway.

mikebartnz
05-09-2010, 12:01 PM
One thing though, washers & dryers use extream amounts of power.

Vacuum Cleaner : 200-700W

Desktop Computer : 80-150W

Also, CRTs will use way more power than LCDs.
Vacuum Cleaners go up to 1800watts.
While that may be so for the desktop PC it is all the peripherals that add to it and some of the power supplies these days are well over 500watts.
Have got an old Gentle Annie washing machine and on a cold wash it costs 0.04 per wash.

gary67
05-09-2010, 12:28 PM
gary67, totally agree, but the best thing of all is to save some $ and not buy a TV in the first place, nothing good on tele these days anyway.

yes I watch more stuff on demand on the PC than I ever do on TV

The Error Guy
05-09-2010, 12:53 PM
One thing though, washers & dryers use extream amounts of power.

Toaster : 800-1500W

Microwave : 600-1500W

Washing Machine : 500W

Iron : 1000W

Electric Mower : 1500W


So, a washing machine uses heaps of power..... compared to a 6v electric motor!! The washer is outdone by even the iron!

Erayd
05-09-2010, 05:17 PM
Clothes dryer : 4000WWhere did you get those numbers from? That's not a regular clothes dryer, anything pulling that much juice through a standard 10A socket / cable will melt something, and is above the rated max for the socket anyway.

Note also that your washing machine will draw a fair bit more than 500W if it has an integrated element rather than being connected to the house's hot water supply.

Billy T
05-09-2010, 08:08 PM
Sure, you will get a saving, but the saving will be miniscule. A TV these days uses about 120w. The highest end TVs will at best have 10W or 20W speakers. You'll have to mute your TV for 50 hours to save about $0.20. You would be an idiot to do that.

The wattage rating of the speakers is irrelevant, that is just their maximum power handling capability. Unless you like your TV very loud indeed, or have a surround-sound system on it you won't be putting out much more than 1-2 wats max to the speakers.

The saving isn't worth having, but turn off the TV when not using it, use energy saving light bulbs, dry washing outside on a line instead of in a dryer, insulate your home or use free firewood for heating (we haven't bought wood for years) and keep your shower time down, and you'll see a big drop in your power bills.

Heating (house and water) is the biggest user of power in the average home

Cheers

Billy 8-{)