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View Full Version : There is a gap in the NZ DVD market - tramping DVDs



ssssss
20-07-2010, 10:36 AM
I feel there is a demand for DVD makers to do films on different tramping tracks. They could do aerial shots of a track, and Map shots. Then they could take cameras along and show the views along the way. Camping sites, huts, wildlife etc. History if any.
The BBC has done "Wainright Walks" by Julia Badbury, - on walks in Britain. I liked those, and I would like to see someone do Walks in NZ.

Terry Porritt
20-07-2010, 12:31 PM
It is a thought, but I have a nagging feeling there could be downsides.

It could encourage more "White Reebock" tourists, resulting in yet even more demand for facilities, bigger and more huts and lodges, tracks to be manicured, etc with a corresponding drain on DOC funds which should be going to conservation.

There has been a significant decrease in bushcraft/tramping skills in more recent years, with reliance on cell phones and GPS, (recent case when two trampers ? had to be lifted out because their GPS packed up :), reliance on reaching a hut (the two who died on the Southern Crossing last year), and reliance on following marked tracks. )

I feel such DVDs could maybe contribute to tramping incidents as we have seen on the Tongariro Crossing with very badly equipped overseas inexperienced "walkers".

On the other hand it is a great idea, I would love to see them, but would I be able to afford them ? :) Maybe only if overseas tourists buy them in large numbers thus bringing the cost down :rolleyes:

Metla
20-07-2010, 12:41 PM
Thats it Terry, NZ is for you and your mates.

John H
20-07-2010, 02:24 PM
Not a bad idea. Contrary to Terry's thoughts, my thought is that if they are realistic enough they might discourage some of the dorks that go into the wilds thinking it is a "walk in the park" (Hagley Park that is).

It can't make the situation at the Tongariro Crossing any worse than it has been for decades - 20+ years ago I met European walkers trying to cross in a southerly storm (with a couple of inches of ice on the downwind side of the marker poles). These idiots were wearing thin nylon parkas and pants, and no decent warm clothes. When I met them, they were trying to retreat - some bleeding and battered; all on the edge of hypothermia.

Well made DVDs might also show some of the dorks I have met in the hills that our huts are self catering - i.e. you carry your own tucker in and your rubbish out. Some overseas trampers expect there will be a shop at their destination, or a warden cooking dinner for you at the hut (e.g. Welcome Flats) like there is in many places overseas (e.g. America and the European Alps). They get in there and then become a burden on the trampers who have to share their food with them.

Many of our tracks and huts have a fantastic history behind them, and that would be great on DVD. The Copland Pass for example - some of the crossings in the old days put our present day trampers to shame (the women Hermitage guests crossing wearing full skirts etc; no crampons and ice axes, with the guides chopping bucket size steps for hours).

Metla
20-07-2010, 02:33 PM
I would definitely be interested, I like the idea of tramping but don't know what I'm in for.

A DVD showing the locations, landscape, routes, and how to prepare would be excellent, I'd definitely buy it.

I have taken a mental note of numerous hour to half-day walks I'll tackle with my kids as they get a bit older.

Snorkbox
20-07-2010, 02:37 PM
Have a look at Man vs Wild on Prime sometime. :-)

Also this book taught me rather a lot somewhat earlier.

http://www.amazon.com/survive-bush-coast-mountains-Zealand/dp/0477010679

I don't have my copy anymore.

John H
20-07-2010, 03:11 PM
(snip)
I have taken a mental note of numerous hour to half-day walks I'll tackle with my kids as they get a bit older.

Best thing I ever did with my son and older daughter. I could never get my youngest out with me unfortunately, although when she was 3 we did a day walk along the Wairarapa Coast from Cape Terawhiti and she went for hours without having to be carried.

We got to a point where my son and I were doing 4 day trips in the Urewera and Kaimanawa Ranges. In turn, he has just taken his daughter out for her first tramp, and she had a brilliant time (she is 9). Overnight trip to a hut a couple of hours in from the carpark.

You might scoff at this comment, but tramping clubs can be great (depending upon the nature of the membership) to get things started. They often have a family section, and take carefully graduated trips so that kids are not put off by the experience.

Two comments if you do try a walk with young kids - 1. they go like a bloody train and then without warning they run out of puff and you can get into trouble because there is nothing left in the tank. 2. activities like toasting marshmallows over a driftwood fire on the beach (or whatever you like to snack on) are a great opportunity to re-charge batteries - our kids still do stuff like that with their kids.

Snorkbox
20-07-2010, 03:36 PM
"we did a day walk along the Wairarapa Coast from Cape Terawhiti"

That is one hell of a walk. Is it possible you started from Cape Palliser? From Cape Terawhiti to Island Bay is about 14 miles.

John H
20-07-2010, 03:52 PM
Oops, sorry. I have been away from Wgtn for too long and got my Capes mixed. I should have said Cape Turakirae. We parked the car at the end of the Coast Rd at the boundary of the station owned by the Riddiford family and walked towards Cape Turakirae and back. Memory is hazy about how far we got along the Coast, but I am pretty sure we got to the raised terraces by the Cape.

I recall being staggered about how far a three year old could walk - on a shingle track too.

Apologies - that would have been a good walk from Cape Terawhiti to the Wairarapa. A bit damp too if we had crossed at the Wellington Heads...

Metla
20-07-2010, 03:54 PM
I have taken the kids on a few walks so far, the oldest is 6 and quite capable and adventurous, The younger is nearly 3, heavy as a sack of cement, and when he has had enough,just stops and wants to be carried.

Still,what we have seen so far in regards to waterfalls, caves, streams,rivers and cliffs has been well worth the effort.

John H
20-07-2010, 04:21 PM
That's the way to go. I gather the key at this stage is to not push them into a situation where you may put them off (too much rain, too cold, too steep, too scary etc).

Maybe the next stage for your older child in a couple of years time is to find a hut that is about 2 hours from the road end, and have an overnight stay. On her first trip to a hut like that, my gdaughter carried her sleeping bag, dry clothes, a soft toy and a book. My son carried everything else. She had a ball, but it was still a bit hard, and on the way out the next day my son had to find room for her sleeping bag in his pack. Main problem is finding a well fitting pack for a youngster, and in this case her Dad's day pack didn't fit her properly and she got sore hips.

I took my middle daughter and her friend in to Maungatepopo Hut, which is only half an hour from the road end, and we dropped our packs and did a day walk up to South Crater which is a bit of a grunt (I think she may have been 15 or so at the time). Stayed the night at Maungatepopo and walked out the following day. A hut like that is a good option too. I later took the same daughter up to a hut in the Kaimai Ranges, but that was too much of a grunt for her. The worst thing though was sleeping in a tent with me, whilst the hut was full of spunky young chaps her age... You don't go tramping with your father after an experience like that.

Snorkbox
20-07-2010, 05:35 PM
@ John H. No need to apologise. I used to park at Riddifords which I believe is up for sale and up the Orongorongo river and Mount Mathews.

John H
20-07-2010, 06:02 PM
Lovely area. Interesting for the kids too because there are seals on the coast and plenty of rock pools to fossick in.

mikebartnz
20-07-2010, 08:04 PM
I have taken the kids on a few walks so far, the oldest is 6 and quite capable and adventurous, The younger is nearly 3, heavy as a sack of cement, and when he has had enough,just stops and wants to be carried.

Still,what we have seen so far in regards to waterfalls, caves, streams,rivers and cliffs has been well worth the effort.
Good on you Metla. It is very satisfying isn't it?:thumbs: