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Chilling_Silence
13-07-2010, 11:30 AM
Hi All,

So usually I use the D510MO, but they don't support virtualization.

I've got myself 10 1U Rackmount cases already, but what I'm hoping for is a CPU / Motherboard combo that ideally has gigabit LAN (Though not crucial) that'll support virtualization.

Quad-core would be a bonus but not a major, dual-core would be cool. Needs to support 8GB RAM.

Any ideas? To be honest I'm not having much luck searching ...

Cheers


Chill.

Speedy Gonzales
13-07-2010, 11:50 AM
One of these ? (http://www.procase.co.nz/VIA/mini_itx.htm). Looks like theyre in Glenfield. The CPU maybe on the mobo? But, I dont think these support VT. Or support up to 8 GB

Chilling_Silence
13-07-2010, 01:06 PM
Yeah I've dealt with ProCase a lot in the past. Not a fan of the VIA stuff, they're *terribly* underpowered. Get more grunt out of the dual-core Atom D510MO boards I've been using ;)

Thanks though.

Any other ideas?

SolMiester
13-07-2010, 01:18 PM
Yeah I've dealt with ProCase a lot in the past. Not a fan of the VIA stuff, they're *terribly* underpowered. Get more grunt out of the dual-core Atom D510MO boards I've been using ;)

Thanks though.

Any other ideas?

What hyper-visor are you going to use and which class? VMware is fussy about hardware!

Chilling_Silence
13-07-2010, 02:10 PM
I'm hoping to use Proxmox VE to be honest

Chilling_Silence
13-07-2010, 03:57 PM
Looks like I may be able to get these:
http://pbtech.co.nz/index.php?item=CPUIT8401 ( http://ark.intel.com/Product.aspx?id=38512 )
http://pbtech.co.nz/index.php?item=MBDGBM0141
http://www.procase.co.nz/IPC/accessories/ccpp24.htm

Now the problem is making sure that the power supply that's in this 1U Case will be enough to power the CPU + 2x 2.5" HDDs!

SolMiester
13-07-2010, 04:45 PM
I'm hoping to use Proxmox VE to be honest

Proxmox VE, is that a Linux app?, is it class 1 or 2 hyper-visor?

Chilling_Silence
13-07-2010, 04:46 PM
http://www.proxmox.com/products/proxmox-ve

It's a linux distro that's a Host OS.

To be honest I'm not entirely sure. I do know it's based off KVM:
http://www.linux-kvm.org/page/Main_Page

SolMiester
13-07-2010, 05:00 PM
http://www.proxmox.com/products/proxmox-ve

It's a linux distro that's a Host OS.

To be honest I'm not entirely sure. I do know it's based off KVM:
http://www.linux-kvm.org/page/Main_Page


Hmmm, looks like type 1, however TBH, i think you would be better off with Citrix XenServer

http://www.citrix.com/lang/English/home.asp

Chilling_Silence
13-07-2010, 05:15 PM
Any reason why?

SolMiester
13-07-2010, 06:51 PM
Any reason why?

1, its an established virtualisation platform with support
2, performance is better on non VT enabled cpu,s
3, greater hardware compatibility list
4, upgrade pathway to VMWare equivalent vMotion

stormdragon
13-07-2010, 07:26 PM
That motherboard looks like ATX though dpn't you want Mini-ITX?

What about one of these (http://www.computerlounge.co.nz/components/componentlist.asp?parttypeid=532&t=2) Zotac boards?

Chilling_Silence
13-07-2010, 07:42 PM
Potentially even better! I'll have a nosey, thanks!

Erayd
13-07-2010, 08:21 PM
1, its an established virtualisation platform with support
2, performance is better on non VT enabled cpu,s
3, greater hardware compatibility list
4, upgrade pathway to VMWare equivalent vMotionHate to break it to you Sol, but:

So are both OpenVZ and KVM (which Proxmox uses)
OpenVZ beats the socks off Xen performance-wise, because it's not trying to virtualise the whole OS - it's basically chroot on steroids.
OpenVZ also has greater hardware compatibility, because it doesn't need hardware virtualisation extensions at all.
Upgrade path to any other jails-based solution, and also to Xen / VMWare with the addition of a kernel.You're right on points 2, half of 3, & 4 where KVM is concerned though.

SolMiester
13-07-2010, 10:23 PM
Hate to break it to you Sol, but:

So are both OpenVZ and KVM (which Proxmox uses)
OpenVZ beats the socks off Xen performance-wise, because it's not trying to virtualise the whole OS - it's basically chroot on steroids.
OpenVZ also has greater hardware compatibility, because it doesn't need hardware virtualisation extensions at all.
Upgrade path to any other jails-based solution, and also to Xen / VMWare with the addition of a kernel.You're right on points 2, half of 3, & 4 where KVM is concerned though.

Well thanks for the info Erayd, however support on open source is more about the users, of which Citrix Xenserver is considerably more widely used...
Im not sure what you mean by virtualising the whole OS, xenserver is a hypervisor, nothing to do with any o/s?
not sure where you are going with this?.....explain?
jails-based?...

Erayd
13-07-2010, 10:45 PM
...however support on open source is more about the users, of which Citrix Xenserver is considerably more widely used...No doubt about that - Xen definitely has a larger user base. I thought you were talking about commercial support though, hence my comment. They both have readily-available commercial versions / support though - OpenVZ mainly in the form of Virtuozzo (http://www.parallels.com/products/pvc45/).


Im not sure what you mean by virtualising the whole OS, xenserver is a hypervisor, nothing to do with any o/s?I mean that each guest is fully virtualised, including all the I/O, and each guest runs an entire operating system, including its own kernel. With OpenVZ that's not the case.


not sure where you are going with this?.....explain?
jails-based?...By 'jails-based', I mean any virtualisation technology that works on a process level rather than hosting an entire OS. OpenVZ is an example of such an approach - each 'container' (i.e. guest system) is completely isolated from all the others, but they all share a common kernel. The segregation is process-based rather than VM-based. It's basically chroot with proper resource management. This (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenVZ) page provides a pretty good overview of it.

BSD jails is another implementation of the same concept.

SolMiester
13-07-2010, 11:04 PM
No doubt about that - Xen definitely has a larger user base. I thought you were talking about commercial support though, hence my comment. They both have readily-available commercial versions / support though - OpenVZ mainly in the form of Virtuozzo (http://www.parallels.com/products/pvc45/).

I mean that each guest is fully virtualised, including all the I/O, and each guest runs an entire operating system, including its own kernel. With OpenVZ that's not the case.

By 'jails-based', I mean any virtualisation technology that works on a process level rather than hosting an entire OS. OpenVZ is an example of such an approach - each 'container' (i.e. guest system) is completely isolated from all the others, but they all share a common kernel. The segregation is process-based rather than VM-based. It's basically chroot with proper resource management. This (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenVZ) page provides a pretty good overview of it.

BSD jails is another implementation of the same concept.

Hi, yeah, I meant the free version, so support from a user base is better....as to the rest, it sounds more like App virtualisation rather than an isolated server o/s guest which mainstream commercial firms would run....while pretty cool, isnt virtualisation as of a server per sa, bit like running java apps or something....which would explain the performance......Xenserver is hate to say it ( I'm VMWare fan) the best type 1 hyper-visor on the market!

Erayd
14-07-2010, 01:07 AM
Hi, yeah, I meant the free version, so support from a user base is better....Oh for sure - they're both pretty good in that respect, but Xen's user base is definitely larger.


...as to the rest, it sounds more like App virtualisation rather than an isolated server o/s guest which mainstream commercial firms would run....while pretty cool, isnt virtualisation as of a server per sa, bit like running java apps or something....which would explain the performance......Not quite - the guest containers run their own version of everything from init upwards. The only (notable) constraint is they must all share the same kernel.

One of the nice side-effects of this approach is it's feasible to run tens or hundreds of guests on a single physical server, and it also allows 'overselling' of hardware - you can run more guests than the hardware is capable of supporting, provided the resulting aggregate load is still under that limit.


Xenserver is hate to say it ( I'm VMWare fan) the best type 1 hyper-visor on the market!:thumbs:

SolMiester
14-07-2010, 09:39 AM
Oh for sure - they're both pretty good in that respect, but Xen's user base is definitely larger.

Not quite - the guest containers run their own version of everything from init upwards. The only (notable) constraint is they must all share the same kernel.

One of the nice side-effects of this approach is it's feasible to run tens or hundreds of guests on a single physical server, and it also allows 'overselling' of hardware - you can run more guests than the hardware is capable of supporting, provided the resulting aggregate load is still under that limit.

:thumbs:

Sounds great, but if anything happens to that kernel, you lose everything....not sure I would want that in a commercial environment.

Erayd
14-07-2010, 11:21 AM
Sounds great, but if anything happens to that kernel, you lose everything....not sure I would want that in a commercial environment.Huh? Not quite sure what you're getting at there, can you expand on that a bit?

In my experience, things don't just 'happen' to kernels, they are caused, usually by people who don't consider all the ramifications of messing with them.

Doesn't your comment also apply to Xen? What if something 'happens' to the hypervisor kernel?

pantera989
15-07-2010, 03:07 AM
Hi All,

So usually I use the D510MO, but they don't support virtualization.

I've got myself 10 1U Rackmount cases already, but what I'm hoping for is a CPU / Motherboard combo that ideally has gigabit LAN (Though not crucial) that'll support virtualization.

Quad-core would be a bonus but not a major, dual-core would be cool. Needs to support 8GB RAM.

Any ideas? To be honest I'm not having much luck searching ...

Cheers


Chill.
Where did you find your rack mount cases? Looking to build something similar myself.

Chilling_Silence
15-07-2010, 10:24 AM
I've imported mine from overseas, the Travla c159 is a *beautiful* case, you have to see it to believe it. Superb craftsmanship in all aspects :D

PM me if you want one, I've just brought in 10!

Pete O'Neil
16-07-2010, 02:54 PM
Have a look at the Gigabyte GA-H55N-USB3, pair it with an entry level i5 and you should get fairly solid performance, at idle its meant to rival a Atom in term of power draw.

Chilling_Silence
16-07-2010, 06:28 PM
Not too expensive either, ~$200, looks quite nice :)