PDA

View Full Version : Where can I learn C# in Auckland?



Knuth
22-06-2010, 07:25 PM
Does anyone know where I can learn C# .net.

* I want to learn after hours
* As quickly as possible
* And a course that is not too expensive

I have a programming background but haven't work as programmer for about 8 years.

And as close to West Auckland as possible.

Has anybody come across a school/tech or other PTE that teaches this?

somebody
22-06-2010, 07:39 PM
If you have a programming background, you'll find formal courses to be boring as hell - they'll teach you concepts you already know, like variable declaration, decision branches, loops, etc. etc.

You might be best off trying to use one of those self-paced learning - I always point people here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-nz/beginner/default%28en-us%29.aspx and suggest they work through some of the tutorials and videos (note that there are both C# and VB resources here, so make sure you pick the right one).

gary67
22-06-2010, 07:50 PM
I was recommended to try Python at the weekend just have to pull my finger out and find an easy tutorial to get started with

Knuth
22-06-2010, 08:55 PM
But will a company hire a guy based on he or she following a course online or do they need to see a cert?

Erayd
22-06-2010, 10:06 PM
But will a company hire a guy based on he or she following a course online or do they need to see a cert?
They will hire based on your experience and what you can do. If you have limited experience and little or no work to show, then a qualification of some kind may help to back up your claim.

One warning - you claim to have a programming background, but need to ask what you've asked in this thread. That doesn't say much for your self-learning or problem solving abilities - it may be worth seriously asking yourself if this is really the path you want to take. Any half-decent programmer should be able to sit down with a textbook for a couple of weeks and get a good handle on something like C# without much trouble, and should be capable of doing their own research.

Paul.Cov
23-06-2010, 07:15 AM
Best answer seems to be to learn from a book, at home, in front of your computer.

I've sourced various C texts via NZ University bookshops (online shop) and Amazon.

Buying texts from the likes of Whitcoulls will add a lot to the price.

I've still to find a book that answers my questions in depth however, and I've gone through a lot of books!

nofam
23-06-2010, 08:44 AM
If you have a programming background, you'll find formal courses to be boring as hell - they'll teach you concepts you already know, like variable declaration, decision branches, loops, etc. etc.

You might be best off trying to use one of those self-paced learning - I always point people here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-nz/beginner/default%28en-us%29.aspx and suggest they work through some of the tutorials and videos (note that there are both C# and VB resources here, so make sure you pick the right one).

Very true - I've recently been getting to understand PHP, and once you get your head around the use of delimiters, the expressions and syntax are all very familiar.

GreacherTech
23-06-2010, 09:04 AM
I think AMES does night courses? but they're quite expensive.
Started my diploma in distributed software developement there but had to leave as i moved to tauranga. also its in town -___-

Sweep
23-06-2010, 01:03 PM
Programming requires logic skills, attention to detail and correct syntax.

I started using COBOL way back and was employed doing same.

Recently I installed Linux on my PC so I could make stand alone programs using the gcc compiler.

This does not mean I will get hired though by anyone.

Renmoo
23-06-2010, 11:37 PM
I think AMES does night courses? but they're quite expensive.
Started my diploma in distributed software developement there but had to leave as i moved to tauranga. also its in town -___-
Just thought of an old post regarding AMES:

http://pressf1.pcworld.co.nz/showthread.php?t=95438&highlight=AMES

Rod J
25-06-2010, 12:57 AM
I started using COBOL way back and was employed doing same.


Wow ... that's going back some time! :p Although I see there's an OO version of COBOL as recent as 2002. It's one of the oldest computer languages going back to 1959.