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BBCmicro
24-05-2010, 03:21 PM
"Create system image" makes a folder called WindowsImageBackup in the root of the backup drive. The folder contains various other folders and files. The main file is about 8 GB for my system (straight after Win7 install). The size of this file is almost exactly the same as the TrueImage backup I did yesterday where I excluded pagefile.sys and hiberfil.sys.

So it's good news that those large files are excluded automatically (the image size would've been about 21 GB if not).

The bad news is that renaming the WindowsImageBackup folder makes it invisible. Not renaming it but putting it into another folder also makes it invisible. If you don't rename it or shift it, the next image backup will overwrite it without warning if your backup drive is eSATA. (It seems to treat eSATA as 'network'). I decided to rename the folders to identify them but change the name back just before restore.

This crude system can be contrasted with TrueImage which produces a single backup file with a .tib extension. You can rename this file as you wish and put it anywhere you like. For restoration TrueImage gives you a clone of Windows Explorer and you just navigate to the location.

Another problem with the Win7 backup is that it takes 2 minutes on my system for the restore process to find the WindowsImageBackup folder! and I only have 2 drives. The 2 minutes can be compared with the 2m40s that the actual imaging takes (whether making the image or restoring it).

I didn't strike any problems over the sizing of the main and backup drives. I imaged to a 500 GB drive and restored to a 75 GB. I presume the imaging is file-based rather than sector. (TrueImage gave me a choice on XP)

After doing my first image+restore on a new W7, I transferred some large files into the music, pictures and video libraries, disconnected the source drive of those files, and did another image+restore. I found that the restored image DID include those data files. In other words, "system image" means everything on the computer - system + data.

This contrasts with various warning messages and with the general flavour of the Backup GUI which seems to be crudely divided into "system image" (left side), user data (top), and application data (underneath) - but nowhere near as straightforward as I'm describing it here!

Overall the GUI is a disappointing mess. Some parts have been dumbed down for the masses (understandable) but other parts are too complex. What's the point of presenting the masses with the word "system" without telling them what "system" means?

pctek
24-05-2010, 04:20 PM
Well an image is a snapshot so of course it includes everything.

And I'd never use MSs built in stuff, get a 3rd party image program and leave the data backups separate.

wainuitech
24-05-2010, 05:23 PM
Sounds like you are being very picky - Generally speaking if you are going to back up a drive you would back it up to a place that is dedicated for that purpose, not moving it about all over the place and renaming it every 5 minutes.

W7 backup works as its designed to. Lots of other backup software its hit and miss as to weather it works correctly or not.

As you found out, true image 11 didn't work for you - I know what I would rather have-- A working backup that takes a few minutes longer, than one thats rushed and fails.

A whole 2.40 Seconds longer -- whipped de do.

BBCmicro
24-05-2010, 05:28 PM
... whole 2.40 Seconds longer.

No it's 2 minutes 40 seconds for the restore...

...and an extra 2 minutes just to locate the folder in the root of the one-and-only backup drive

wainuitech
24-05-2010, 05:51 PM
I just did a back to back test.

Acronis true Image took just over a minute longer to locate a XP backup I did last year on a network drive, than W7's backup.

I gave up using Acronis are repeat failures of Vista backups. Last year when W7 came out I tried again - once again Acronis failed to even create the backup -- Oh sure it said it had done it, but when I tried to image it back - as a test, total failure.

Backup these days I use WHS over the LAN for 5 PC's nightly -- never failed once. (apart from when the router died one night).

ryanjames.powell
24-05-2010, 06:15 PM
Backup these days I use WHS over the LAN for 5 PC's nightly -- never failed once. (apart from when the router died one night).

Agreed - Windows Home Server is brilliant.

R.M.
24-05-2010, 06:51 PM
What about using Acronis for backup of C Drive (OS and programmes only)?

I've been using Acronis True Image Home (11) for backup of XP Pro for the last 18 months successfully, but am pondering a new system with Window 7 on it - probably the Professional version. Your thoughts would be appreciated!

DeSade
24-05-2010, 06:58 PM
I use the built-in Win7 backup tool no issues at all, does its job on schedule and without bothering me, no complaints.

wainuitech
24-05-2010, 07:10 PM
Another program I am looking at is Active @ disk Image (http://www.disk-image.net/) - been using their data recovery software lately, its brilliant.

Have downloaded the trial, just wish it allowed a bootable CD -- Oh well if the trial works OK I may just buy it. ( this is for other OS's than W7) or as another option. 3 user for $39 US aint to bad.

In fact just tonight - a knackered OS, Vista -- Linux cant see anything, ERD commander the same, - active @ partition recovery sees it all.

SolMiester
25-05-2010, 12:04 PM
"Create system image" makes a folder called WindowsImageBackup in the root of the backup drive. The folder contains various other folders and files. The main file is about 8 GB for my system (straight after Win7 install). The size of this file is almost exactly the same as the TrueImage backup I did yesterday where I excluded pagefile.sys and hiberfil.sys.

So it's good news that those large files are excluded automatically (the image size would've been about 21 GB if not).

The bad news is that renaming the WindowsImageBackup folder makes it invisible. Not renaming it but putting it into another folder also makes it invisible. If you don't rename it or shift it, the next image backup will overwrite it without warning if your backup drive is eSATA. (It seems to treat eSATA as 'network'). I decided to rename the folders to identify them but change the name back just before restore.

This crude system can be contrasted with TrueImage which produces a single backup file with a .tib extension. You can rename this file as you wish and put it anywhere you like. For restoration TrueImage gives you a clone of Windows Explorer and you just navigate to the location.

Another problem with the Win7 backup is that it takes 2 minutes on my system for the restore process to find the WindowsImageBackup folder! and I only have 2 drives. The 2 minutes can be compared with the 2m40s that the actual imaging takes (whether making the image or restoring it).

I didn't strike any problems over the sizing of the main and backup drives. I imaged to a 500 GB drive and restored to a 75 GB. I presume the imaging is file-based rather than sector. (TrueImage gave me a choice on XP)

After doing my first image+restore on a new W7, I transferred some large files into the music, pictures and video libraries, disconnected the source drive of those files, and did another image+restore. I found that the restored image DID include those data files. In other words, "system image" means everything on the computer - system + data.

This contrasts with various warning messages and with the general flavour of the Backup GUI which seems to be crudely divided into "system image" (left side), user data (top), and application data (underneath) - but nowhere near as straightforward as I'm describing it here!

Overall the GUI is a disappointing mess. Some parts have been dumbed down for the masses (understandable) but other parts are too complex. What's the point of presenting the masses with the word "system" without telling them what "system" means?

Ok, so you have shares in True Image?....I find Windows 7 for home use fantastic.....Why do you need to rename the image?, if it is on a backup drive, a bit pedantic isnt it?...Also, Windows 7 backup is single file storage, true image is not, windows 7 will do increments, so gets quicker...

Paul.Cov
25-05-2010, 01:17 PM
The bad news is that renaming the WindowsImageBackup folder makes it invisible. Not renaming it but putting it into another folder also makes it invisible. If you don't rename it or shift it, the next image backup will overwrite it without warning

So the folder itself has some fancy (annoying) properties, probably to help protect it.

The alternative is to create a new folder on your backup drive, then COPY and PASTE the CONTENTS of this WindowsImageBackup folder (not the folder itself) into that new folder.
This should then allow you to make as many different backup copies as space allows, and you can rename the folders at will.