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View Full Version : Want to build a PC



cancer393
17-05-2010, 02:18 AM
So I wanna give it a go and try building my own PC.
I've messed around with my current Dell over the years and feel fairly comfortable inside a computer case. :clap
My first question, of I'm sure many :help:, is what sort of motherboard and CPU should I be looking at?
I'm really confused :confused: with all the options available today.
I'm not a big online gamer so this is not important.
I'm mostly on the internet, watching videos and multitasking with many programs open at once.
I'm just looking to have a nice fast PC that can cope with this type of usage.
Any information or suggestions would be very very much appreciated!!!
:2cents:

Cheers! :cool:

gary67
17-05-2010, 07:42 AM
i5 or i7 CPU with matching motherboard DDR3 RAM and nice fast graphics card. What's budget and do you need monitor, keyboard, mouse and case?

pctek
17-05-2010, 08:57 AM
ASUS or Gigabyte motherboard. Core i5 CPU - there's a range to suit your budget.
DDR3-1333 matches the combo.
Corsair PSU, Seagate or WD hard drive.
Whatever case takes your fancy - don't use the bundled PSU if it comes with one.

Terry Porritt
17-05-2010, 11:07 AM
Here's what I've just built up, as I'm not into gaming onboard graphics is adequate for me:
CPU: Intel i5-660 with stock heatsink and fan
M/B: Gigabyte GA-H57M-USB3 microATX
PSU: Corsair 450VX 450watt.
RAM: Corsair Dominator 4GB Dual Channel kit pC12800 DDR3 1600MHz
HDD: Seagate Barracuda 7200.12 500GB SATA-300 7200rpm (2 off)
DVD: ASUS DRW-24B1LT SATA
CASE: Enermax Chakra Mid tower.

Microsoft 600 wired keyboard and mouse.

Philips Brilliance 225P 22" Widescreen 1680x1050

and for backup-cloning purposes a SATA HDD mobile rack unit, ViPower VP-5010LSF.

OS: Windows 7 Home Premium OEM

This system is extremely quiet.

This may give ideas as a starting point.

I usually get all my stuff from Paradigm as they give good service, rapid delivery, and have used them since they first started up. Not always the cheapest, but it's swings and roundabouts.

utopian201
17-05-2010, 11:08 AM
If you get a corei5/i3, you can use the graphics integrated into the CPU. That way you can save on having to get a graphics card, until you actually need one.

cancer393
17-05-2010, 11:13 AM
Awesome!
Thank you all for the responses so far.
:thanks

Thebananamonkey
17-05-2010, 10:34 PM
i3 is very likely good enough for you. Save yourself the money.

If it were me, I'd just buy a laptop of a similar price to what you're hoping to spend on a computer. If you wanted a larger screen, you could buy a 22" for ~$300.

If you're only using it to surf and watch movies, then I think building a rig is OTT. Start gaming and it's a different story.

bk T
18-05-2010, 10:34 AM
If it were me, I'd just buy a laptop of a similar price to what you're hoping to spend on a computer. If you wanted a larger screen, you could buy a 22" for ~$300.

...

With the same price, you can get a much better specs desktop!

Agent_24
18-05-2010, 12:23 PM
If you really want to save money, get an AMD system...

The Phenom II is very cheap and more than enough for light gaming or any common desktop usage.

Sum1
18-05-2010, 08:51 PM
id say get a i5 2gb ram with 1 of these http://www.pbtech.co.nz/index.php?item=HDDWD2003&PHPSESSID=d8be89fbc0d1b13544a943b6dd0b3d14 hdds 2tb for $200 nice and cheap

Thebananamonkey
19-05-2010, 12:26 AM
With the same price, you can get a much better specs desktop!

If he's only watching movies and surfing the net, which specs constitute better?
I'd argue that weight and size are equally if not more important. Not to mention the amount of wires you lose.

Agent_24
19-05-2010, 12:30 AM
It'll last longer before it needs upgrading, and when you do want to upgrade, it will be easier.

Unless you need portability, I can't see much point in a laptop. The wires aren't going to matter if it's a desktop anyway because it won't be moving anywhere...

Battleneter2
19-05-2010, 11:37 AM
If he's only watching movies and surfing the net, which specs constitute better?
I'd argue that weight and size are equally if not more important. Not to mention the amount of wires you lose.

Notebooks work out substantially more expensive due to upgradeability, shorter life and more expensive to repair. Not to mention generally slower due to often slow HDD's and aggressive power save options unless you buy a expensive high spec option.

If you don't "need" or want to be portable avoid notebooks.

Thebananamonkey
19-05-2010, 01:38 PM
Notebooks work out substantially more expensive due to upgradeability, shorter life and more expensive to repair. Not to mention generally slower due to often slow HDD's and aggressive power save options unless you buy a expensive high spec option.

If you don't "need" or want to be portable avoid notebooks.

My girlfriend bought her laptop two years ago for substantially less than my computer. It's still going strong. No need to upgrade.

When we go to Auckland (which is often) guess who's computer we take?

Hers plays movies, does word processing and surfs the internets, which are the requirements of OP. It's not as fast as my monster. But does it need to be?

I think that for the majority of users these days that, as long as they don't intend to play games, laptops are the way to go. They work out of the box and if they break down then you just send them in on warranty.

All I'm saying is that instead of saying what WE would do, think of what fits OP's needs instead.

Agent_24
19-05-2010, 02:11 PM
All I'm saying is that instead of saying what WE would do, think of what fits OP's needs instead.


So I wanna give it a go and try building my own PC.

Sure you can build laptops yourself, but you're quite limited and it's not as much fun...

legod
19-05-2010, 02:48 PM
I just built my first pc.
I went for a good quality case and PSU - otherwise pretty basic components.
Main reasons I chose the motherboard were because it had HDMI and integrated graphics.
Pretty quiet system - perfect for everyday usage.

CPU: AMD AthlonX2 DC 250 3.0GHz ($107)
Mobo: Gigabyte MA785GM-US2H 785G ($145)
Case: Lian Li A05N-B ($188)
PSU: Corsair CX 400W ($99)
RAM: Corsair CM2X2048-6400C5 2GB ($88)

Already had SATA HDD, monitor, keyboard etc, so total cost all up was $627.

cancer393
20-05-2010, 02:24 PM
I just built my first pc.
I went for a good quality case and PSU - otherwise pretty basic components.
Main reasons I chose the motherboard were because it had HDMI and integrated graphics.
Pretty quiet system - perfect for everyday usage.

CPU: AMD AthlonX2 DC 250 3.0GHz ($107)
Mobo: Gigabyte MA785GM-US2H 785G ($145)
Case: Lian Li A05N-B ($188)
PSU: Corsair CX 400W ($99)
RAM: Corsair CM2X2048-6400C5 2GB ($88)

Already had SATA HDD, monitor, keyboard etc, so total cost all up was $627.

Cool! That's exactly the things I would need. I have the HDD, monitor, etc.
I guess the RAM could be increased to 4GB?

Speedy Gonzales
20-05-2010, 02:28 PM
I guess the RAM could be increased to 4GB?

If you're going to install 64 bit, it'll help

Agent_24
20-05-2010, 02:32 PM
It'll help even if you run 32-bit, you'll still get an extra 1.25 - 1.5GB or so RAM for use.

cancer393
20-05-2010, 02:40 PM
ok, my current os is 32bit vista.

Nomad
20-05-2010, 02:40 PM
I'll just throw the mix in. Many people prefer a laptop provided they are not high end users. Surf the web, a bit of Office, mp3, dvd, take it to the lounge etc .. with wireless. Most of my friends have switched to laptops.

FYI, may kit up a PC for my bro, we could get away with just $200 not incl case, psu and hard drive and screen.

Nomad
20-05-2010, 02:41 PM
ok, my current os is 32bit vista.

You may not be able to reuse that cos it might be built right into the Dell, no install CDs. Windows on the other hand is $200 each approx. Take your pick 32 or 64bit. If 64bit I get more RAM.

cancer393
20-05-2010, 02:43 PM
vista is a upgrade i've bought since

Nomad
20-05-2010, 02:43 PM
32bit seriously should be fine for most pple. and you save the $200 going to 64.

cancer393
20-05-2010, 02:43 PM
i'm guessing i could up to 64bit if i move to windows 7 in the future?

Nomad
20-05-2010, 02:53 PM
that's an option but if you are just doing normal stuff, you don't really need 4gb of ram.

sure win7 64 but that's $200.

to save a bit of dough you could get maybe 2gb on one stick of ram and upgrade the other module down the road, that's what we might do with my bro's pc. he only use the net, email, ms office and publisher.

cancer393
20-05-2010, 02:59 PM
Cheers!

Agent_24
20-05-2010, 03:22 PM
That will only work reliably if your first 2GB stick is the same as the 2GB stick you will buy in the future.

If you buy one with slightly different timings later, you may get problems.

I suggest you buy 4GB now, or buy 2GB now, and then sell it later, and buy a 4GB set. It eliminates any possible problems.

I don't think you can upgrade from a 32-Bit to a 64-Bit Windows.

cancer393
20-05-2010, 03:25 PM
I don't think you can upgrade from a 32-Bit to a 64-Bit Windows.

You can't, I would look and getting the full 64bit version if I wanted to do it.

legod
20-05-2010, 05:37 PM
Cool! That's exactly the things I would need. I have the HDD, monitor, etc.
I guess the RAM could be increased to 4GB?

Yes -I just stuck with 2GB now to see how it went. No point in paying for more than I need. And for what I'm using it for, no point in paying for DDR3 (which is a minimal upgrade anyway from what I've read). The motherboard I chose - I'm not sure if it takes DDR3 anyway. I may go and get another identical 2GB ram at some stage soon.
I'm also intending on putting an HD tv tuner in there but haven't chosen on a model yet.

I've also just started using the latest release of Ubuntu (10.04) for my operating system. I'm quite impressed so far...last time I had a fling with it, it was more hassle than it was worth, but linux seems to have come along way since then in terms of catering for home users like me. I've had a go with Windows 7. It's ok but if you want to save yourself money, Ubuntu would be worth a fling.

I may stick with it....if I can just figure out how to sync my ipod touch.

Dannz
20-05-2010, 05:39 PM
As far as i know (I could be wrong) but your ipod touch needs to be jailbroken to sync with linux, and it requires some nasty hack.

legod
20-05-2010, 05:43 PM
I just built my first pc.
I went for a good quality case and PSU - otherwise pretty basic components.
Main reasons I chose the motherboard were because it had HDMI and integrated graphics.
Pretty quiet system - perfect for everyday usage.

CPU: AMD AthlonX2 DC 250 3.0GHz ($107)
Mobo: Gigabyte MA785GM-US2H 785G ($145)
Case: Lian Li A05N-B ($188)
PSU: Corsair CX 400W ($99)
RAM: Corsair CM2X2048-6400C5 2GB ($88)

Already had SATA HDD, monitor, keyboard etc, so total cost all up was $627.

I also added an LG GH-22LS50 22X Internal SATA DVD for $66. It's one of those lightscribey thingies...

legod
20-05-2010, 05:46 PM
As far as i know (I could be wrong) but your ipod touch needs to be jailbroken to sync with linux, and it requires some nasty hack.

Yeah I think you may be right there. Unfortunately I accidently let iTunes do a firmware update when I had it plugged into my old machine which was running XP. Not so sure there's a jailbreak for the latest firmware out yet.

Ubuntu 10.04 recognises ipod touch/iphone...just haven't played around with it yet to see if it will let me transfer files on and off.

cancer393
22-05-2010, 02:34 PM
Should I look into a motherboard/RAM that's DDR3 rather than DDR2???