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nedkelly
01-05-2010, 11:45 PM
Hey my mates hard drive in his macbook has just failed. He did not keep any of his important files backed up, so he needs a data recovery company in Auckland that is really good and not too expensive.

Speedy Gonzales
01-05-2010, 11:46 PM
What kind of hdd is it? SCSI?

nedkelly
01-05-2010, 11:56 PM
Macbooks use sata.

DeSade
02-05-2010, 12:01 AM
You might be able to slave it and get the data off, I have done that before.

Also booting into something like Puppy Linux can help access dead drives that aren't quite dead.

Speedy Gonzales
02-05-2010, 12:05 AM
Yup connect it to a sata connection then. See if the BIOS can see it. If it can, I maybe able to get whatever off it. But you / your mate would have to bring it to mt eden. What filesystem does it use?

nedkelly
02-05-2010, 12:22 AM
Hmm I think it is HFS+ Will check

Speedy Gonzales
02-05-2010, 12:25 AM
Ok. I dont know if this program supports HFS+. I'll have to check Google / the site

jackM
02-05-2010, 12:31 AM
It it's important data, take it to a specialist. "connecting it to a sata port" and "booting a linux distro" are not the actions of a specialist. datarecovery.co.nz have a very good reputation.

nedkelly
02-05-2010, 12:34 AM
does datarecovery.co.nz do mac formats?

Speedy Gonzales
02-05-2010, 12:35 AM
According to this they do (http://datarecovery.co.nz/capabilities-hdd.html)

DeSade
02-05-2010, 12:46 AM
I am willing to bet the price is your first born for that.

jackM
02-05-2010, 01:25 AM
Possibly. Of course it all comes down to "can I afford to, or am I willing to, lose this data".

Sweep
02-05-2010, 01:26 AM
Hey my mates hard drive in his macbook has just failed. He did not keep any of his important files backed up, so he needs a data recovery company in Auckland that is really good and not too expensive.

I have ask again. What is too expensive and what is important and what can't be replaced given the source docs or pics.

It's all relative.

Orca
02-05-2010, 02:20 AM
Computer Forensics will charge you $2500+ for data recovery of a drive.

There used to be another one that I used that did it for <$1000 and were quite good. Took a while though. Peacock Technologies I think, not sure if they're still in business.

wainuitech
02-05-2010, 09:42 AM
I have ask again. What is too expensive and what is important and what can't be replaced given the source docs or pics.

It's all relative.I'm going to have person that exact question this week - their HDD dumped everything, and even slaving it, and scanning with several very good data recovery programs cant locate the data.

I found This place (http://www.digitalrecovery.co.nz/services/) - that says, its $70 just to look, then starts at $300 + for recovery.( no idea if they are any good or not)

BUT the previously link speedy put - I know they are good -- just depends if the data is more important than the $$

nedkelly
02-05-2010, 09:51 AM
Thanks guys. Will give the links to my mate.

wainuitech
02-05-2010, 10:20 AM
last time I called Computer Forensics for a verbal quote - they said -- $80 to look and see if they can get the data (non refundable), then depending on whats required $800 + to recover it. (this was last year)

Billy T
02-05-2010, 11:38 PM
I have some personal question marks over CF. Some years ago, and before I discovered PF1, in fact it may have been before PF1, I had a 2GB data-only drive that just went dead. To all extents and purposes, it was not in the computer.

CF recovered the data and charged $1000 for the job, which roughly equates to their $3000 figure now, but would not tell me what the problem had been. I received the recovered data on two CDs and of course I got the drive back as well. I kept it as a $1000 paperweight and permanent reminder about the virtues of backing up important data and I still have it.

Being an electronics tech myself, it always intrigued me that there was no evidence that the drive had been physically worked on in any way. Several years later my curiosity got the better of me and I hooked in back into my computer. Well, there in all its glory was my data, just as it should have been, and the drive continued to read and write normally thereafter.

To this day I have always wondered whether there was actually anything wrong with it at all, and whether it was a simple connection failure that re-plugging would have fixed at the time.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

zqwerty
03-05-2010, 12:04 AM
In the context of hard disk drives, stiction refers to the tendency of read/write heads to stick to the platters. Stiction is a complex and not very well understood phenomenon of hard disks. Stiction most likely occurs as a result of two properties of the platters, smoothness and magnetic forces. Once the heads have stuck to the platters, the disk will be prevented from spinning up and can cause physical damage to the media. Other forces considered as responsible for stiction include electrostatic forces and adhesion from the inherent stickiness of silicon.[citation needed]

In the early models of hard disk drives stiction was known to cause read/write heads to stick the platters of the hard drive due to the breakdown of lubricants used to coat the platters. During the late 1980s and early 1990s as the size of hard drive platters decreased from the older 8" and 5.25" sizes to 3.5" and smaller, manufacturers continued to use the same calendering processes and lubricants used on the older, larger drives. The much tighter space caused much higher internal operating temperatures in these newer smaller drives, often leading to an accelerated breakdown of the surface lubricants into their much stickier components. When the drive was powered off and would cool down(say at the end of the day when a user went home and shut off their PC), these now-broken-down lubricants would become quite viscous and sticky, sometimes causing the read/write heads to literally stick to the platter. The common solution to this problem was the counter-intuitive move of taking the affected drive out of the host system, striking it gently, but firmly on the side against a desk or something as laterally as possible and then re-install it in the host system. This would break the heads free of the goop long enough to power the system back on, have the drive spin up and recover whatever data could be retrieved off it. While the data was retrieved, the machine would be left on constantly so that the heat from the drive's internals would keep the decaying lubricants in a liquid state.

From here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stiction

linw
03-05-2010, 10:34 AM
Ah, yes, the old memories flood back! Stiction - thumping the disk on its edge often fixed that!!

B.M.
03-05-2010, 11:47 AM
So is there a way out if no computer can see the drive?

Iíve had a couple of instances where no matter what computer the drive was put in it just couldnít be seen.

My conclusion was the board on the HDD itself had failed and that was that. However, I now wonder if a board can be removed and repaired or replaced?

Sweep
03-05-2010, 11:53 AM
So is there a way out if no computer can see the drive?

Iíve had a couple of instances where no matter what computer the drive was put in it just couldnít be seen.

My conclusion was the board on the HDD itself had failed and that was that. However, I now wonder if a board can be removed and repaired or replaced?

That is what they do. Replace the Hard drive controller among other things.