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Nomad
17-04-2010, 06:53 PM
Anyone tried a eco heater? They are a flat panel stuck on a wall.

I came across this type of heater, I bought one but they allow me to return it.

I am a bit skeptical for a 260W or a 400W heater when most heaters are 2,000-2,400 Watts (even for a small bathroom fan heater).
I got the small one for my 3x2m room :D

Trying to get my heating bills down for this winter. I learnt to do some calculations and found that a 2.5kW heater for 5hrs a day every day can really blow up the power bills and esp when you may have 3 or 4 going in the house.


Cheers.

Consumer NZ hasn't reviewed them either.

lakewoodlady
17-04-2010, 07:31 PM
I looked at getting one for my hallway area (the larger one) which they say run at around 10 cents per hour. Way too expensive and would work out to $5.60 per week if I ran it for 8 hours per day.
Also, they don't give instant heat and take a while to just warm an area.

LL

pine-o-cleen
17-04-2010, 07:41 PM
We had some in a house we rented. They worked well at keeping the ambient temperature up a few degrees, but when it got too cold you really needed another source of heat. 10c per hour? That sounds expensive lakewoodlady.

martynz
17-04-2010, 07:50 PM
There used to be electric storage heaters in the UK which were filled with heatable "bricks". They used cheaper off-peak (like 10pm to 6am) electricity to heat the "bricks" and the stored heat was released slowly during the peak time.
You can never get more for your money than the power(wattage) you pay for.

Martynz

Nomad
17-04-2010, 07:55 PM
Yes, will do a test drive.
10c is a lot cheaper than 40c an hour for a 2kW.

Chilling_Silence
17-04-2010, 07:56 PM
We were using heaters ... But we went for a gas heater in the end, truckloads cheaper and more efficient!

Nomad
17-04-2010, 08:11 PM
There used to be electric storage heaters in the UK which were filled with heatable "bricks". They used cheaper off-peak (like 10pm to 6am) electricity to heat the "bricks" and the stored heat was released slowly during the peak time.
You can never get more for your money than the power(wattage) you pay for.

Martynz

I read about them, you need a day/night power meter at your place or get them to swap it out. They have a lower rate at offpeak like 11pm - 7am and at day time they release the warm air out but per kW they are still around 7c, depends on how many kW the heater is, if it was a 2kW that would be 14c an hour ..

gary67
17-04-2010, 08:24 PM
There used to be electric storage heaters in the UK which were filled with heatable "bricks". They used cheaper off-peak (like 10pm to 6am) electricity to heat the "bricks" and the stored heat was released slowly during the peak time.
You can never get more for your money than the power(wattage) you pay for.

Martynz

They are available here at least they used to be, my folks in Blighty have them in the whole house and one of our previous houses here had one in and I have come across others here

John H
17-04-2010, 09:41 PM
They have been here for decades. They are usually called Nitestor heaters.

gary67
17-04-2010, 09:46 PM
They have been here for decades. They are usually called Nitestor heaters.

Same as everywhere else then

John H
17-04-2010, 09:47 PM
Anyone tried a eco heater? They are a flat panel stuck on a wall.
(etc).

I am not sure if what I have is the same as what you are talking about. They used to be made by a firm called Plaster Craft or something similar. They were designed as a mesh of heating wires to be plastered into a wall - kind of like underfloor heating.

I have one that they made into a panel heater about 2 foot by 1 foot by 1 inch deep. I have it screwed to the inside of the modesty panel of my computer desk - it has been there for about 10 years.

It warms up that cold air under the desk - you may have noticed that if you sit at a desk for any length of time your legs get frozen (well, at least on the mainland they do...). It uses a very small amount of power, keeps your lower body warm, and once it has been on a while, the heat rises from the keyhole part of your desk and keeps your hands, arms, and body warm as well. It doesn't do a whole lot of good as a heater for your back of course.

It reduces the amount of heat you have to distribute around the room via another form of heating. Very pleasant, very effective, and costs nothing to run.

tweak'e
17-04-2010, 10:05 PM
Anyone tried a eco heater? They are a flat panel stuck on a wall.

I came across this type of heater, I bought one but they allow me to return it.

I am a bit skeptical for a 260W or a 400W heater when most heaters are 2,000-2,400 Watts (even for a small bathroom fan heater).
I got the small one for my 3x2m room :D

Trying to get my heating bills down for this winter. I learnt to do some calculations and found that a 2.5kW heater for 5hrs a day every day can really blow up the power bills and esp when you may have 3 or 4 going in the house.


Cheers.

Consumer NZ hasn't reviewed them either.

i think the whole idea of an electrical heater being "eco" is total BS.
sure its small heater but it will give out small heat. used to run small bar heaters or "closet heaters" i think they where called. fairly useless unless your heating a very small aera like under a desk, closet.
i think they are just marketing BS. you would be better off with a fan heater (assuming you going with electrical heating). at least a fan heater spreads the heat around and not just heat up one wall.

Nomad
17-04-2010, 10:59 PM
Hmmm... ok. There were two sizes, 260W I have and the 400W. It says it heats a 9 and 12m square size room .....

http://www.econo-heat.co.nz/index.php

Other than that I am looking at a heat pump for my room, maybe a 2.4kW which appears to the smallest, don't like electrical heaters, the kW cost too much to run.

Digby
18-04-2010, 09:10 AM
Hmmm... ok. There were two sizes, 260W I have and the 400W. It says it heats a 9 and 12m square size room .....

http://www.econo-heat.co.nz/index.php

Other than that I am looking at a heat pump for my room, maybe a 2.4kW which appears to the smallest, don't like electrical heaters, the kW cost too much to run.

You mean "electric heaters" I presume.

Yes they may cost more, but a heat pump will cost a lot more upfront and will still use electricity.

I think it depends on the room and the circumstances.

Those oil filled column heaters are good for small rooms, they take the chill off quite nicely, and a lot cheaper to run than say a fan heater.

Digby
18-04-2010, 09:12 AM
i think the whole idea of an electrical heater being "eco" is total BS.
sure its small heater but it will give out small heat. Used to run small bar heaters or "closet heaters" i think they where called. fairly useless unless your heating a very small area like under a desk, closet.
i think they are just marketing BS.

x2

They should call them "small flat panel heaters" !

Nomad
18-04-2010, 09:23 AM
x2

They should call them "small flat panel heaters" !

They are not oil fin heaters. It's like a piece of 5mm thick ceramic board that's all. Some calls them resistor heaters.

I have it on a brick for trialling now. I will be returning it back today. I had it on for nearly an hour now, I cannot feel heat. Wait to June, haha, I would be a popsicle.

It might be ok if you leave it on 24/7 every day and if it is cold, use a 2nd but a normal 2kW heater. My oil fin heater gets warm in 30mins. This heater here is a joke. No wonder shops didn't sell them other than Placemakers. Bunnings didn't have them.

I am fed up with NZ weather and tierd of hugging to the heater and paying those bills. For this small room, I may get the smallest, from the maths I need a 1.9kW heat pump and some of them the coefficient of perforamance could be as high as 5x, which means a 2.5kW heat pump may only require 500W of power input.

Sweep
18-04-2010, 09:30 AM
The best thing you can do is insulate and double glaze windows. Putting on more clothes may be another partial solution.

Nomad
18-04-2010, 09:39 AM
I've got my down duvet jacket on these days, I refuse to turn on heaters to I get the heat pump in my room. I'm more than happy to pay for that than to spend every winter every year like the past.
Like 2x iPads right :D

Insulation being down this month. Plan to upgrade to R5.0.

lakewoodlady
18-04-2010, 10:02 AM
We had some in a house we rented. They worked well at keeping the ambient temperature up a few degrees, but when it got too cold you really needed another source of heat. 10c per hour? That sounds expensive lakewoodlady.

The Econopanel heaters were on display at the recent Home and Garden show and the man quoted 9 - 10 cents per hour to run, for the 400 watt, and 5-6 cents per hour for the 260 watt one. I think one might just be suitable for a small room that gets just a little bit chilly say somewhere in Northland. Not for Taupo when its - 0.

LL

R2x1
18-04-2010, 10:10 AM
The greatest benefit of those little heaters is keeping seldom used rooms drier. Having one in the toilet during winter is a pleasant luxury in the small hours of a winter morning if you have a mean climate. Just have it on a timer to run from 10 at night until 7 in the morning; if you are in Southland change the timer to March through November.

Peter H
18-04-2010, 12:07 PM
Most places in NZ charge around 22c per Kw/hour, so the cost of a 500w Eco would be 12c per hour. With electric heaters (not heat pumps) all are 100% efficient. The ECO heaters are very good at taking the chill off, and a friend of mine is happy with them for this use. Naturally, a larger heater needs to be used for getting really warm.

gary67
18-04-2010, 12:13 PM
I've got my down duvet jacket on these days, I refuse to turn on heaters to I get the heat pump in my room. I'm more than happy to pay for that than to spend every winter every year like the past.
Like 2x iPads right :D

Insulation being down this month. Plan to upgrade to R5.0.

you should move it's 21C here today shorts and T shirt weather still :cool:

tweak'e
18-04-2010, 12:22 PM
.........

Those oil filled column heaters are good for small rooms, they take the chill off quite nicely, and a lot cheaper to run than say a fan heater.

sweet bugger all. only difference between them is the fan one runs a fan which uses a little bit of power (~1-2watt??). when it comes to heaters wattage is wattage, there is no differences between the different types. a 2400w oil heater is just the same as a 2400w fan heater.


the main differences in heaters is fans blow air around the room, reflection heaters reflect some heat towards you, non-fanned heaters rely on heating the whole room top to bottom .....the top first.
if the heater is beside a wall all the heat goes up the wall to the ceiling. if its a small heater it will takes ages to heat the room. if the insulation is not great or people keep walking in/out, then the room will not heat up and you might as well just turn it off.

most of the big heaters have thermostats so once room is up to temp they run just like a very small heater.

gary67
18-04-2010, 12:25 PM
Last winter I was working on the new sports hall at Murchison, it was damn cold down there anyway they installed heaters high up in the ceiling that don't heat an area they only heat objects. They are very effective wish I could remember what they were called

somebody
18-04-2010, 12:26 PM
You can never get more for your money than the power(wattage) you pay for.



You can with heatpumps, because they're not creating heat from electricity as such, they're sucking heat energy from outside and transferring it inside.

feersumendjinn
18-04-2010, 02:26 PM
Last winter I was working on the new sports hall at Murchison, it was damn cold down there anyway they installed heaters high up in the ceiling that don't heat an area they only heat objects. They are very effective wish I could remember what they were called
Like these?
http://www.globalindustrial.com/p/hvac/heaters/gas-infrared/propane-heater-infrared-vacuum-compact-u-tube-35000-btu-15l?utm_source=google_pr&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=Infrared-Gas-google_pr&infoParam.campaignId=T9F

gary67
18-04-2010, 03:27 PM
Like these?
http://www.globalindustrial.com/p/hvac/heaters/gas-infrared/propane-heater-infrared-vacuum-compact-u-tube-35000-btu-15l?utm_source=google_pr&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=Infrared-Gas-google_pr&infoParam.campaignId=T9F

Hmm the ones I mentioned were all electric

pctek
18-04-2010, 03:50 PM
They are usually called Nitestor heaters.

Neighbour has one of them. She said it was great until I found out what her winter power bill was. Massive.

catspyjamas
18-04-2010, 04:21 PM
AVOID! I have those heaters in my house - 2 x 400W ones in lounge (either end) & 1 x 260W one in spare room. They are crap! The only significant difference they make is to the power bill (& not in a good way). You have to have them on 24/7 in the winter to make any appreciable difference, and then all I find they do is take the chill off the air.

With both on it the air temp is raised by a few degrees tops, but they take most of the day to do that even. You still need jerseys and another heater on to be warm. I had the two in the lounge on 24/7 for July and August 2008 and my power bills were HUGELY increased. I used half the amount of electricty last winter when I just used a 2000W radiant heater when I was actually in the lounge. To be honest I think I still used the radiant heater as much with the "Eco" (ha!) heaters on than when they were off.

I don't think the benefit of having the chill taken off the air outweighs the cost, myself.

John H
18-04-2010, 04:39 PM
Neighbour has one of them. She said it was great until I found out what her winter power bill was. Massive.

Double massive. We had one in our 1920s bungalow. It was great for Herself when she came home in the late afternoon to a warmish house. Apart from the Nitestor, the house was unheated during the day - I worked in an outside office so there was no need to spend money on keeping an empty house warm.

However, the bills in winter were appalling. As soon as the Nitestor went on, bang. As soon as it went off, the bills plummeted. In our present 3 year old brick double glazed draught free house, there is no need for one thank goodness.

John H
18-04-2010, 04:41 PM
AVOID! (snip).

I will keep the one on the modesty panel of my desk, because it is very effective against cold legs. However, I cannot imagine how they could heat a room.

catspyjamas
18-04-2010, 04:49 PM
Yeah it would be ideal as leg warmer-upper under the desk, but pretty useless for spaces larger than that.

pine-o-cleen
18-04-2010, 04:57 PM
They have been here for decades. They are usually called Nitestor heaters.

I don't think he was talking about Nitestor heaters. I think the OP means these:

http://www.econo-heat.co.nz/index.php

That's what I was talking about anyway.

catspyjamas
18-04-2010, 05:03 PM
Yes, the ones in your link there are the exact ones I'm talking about too, pine-o-cleen.

Brucem
18-04-2010, 05:14 PM
We had a nightstore heater in our hall, it kept the bedrooms at a reasonable temperature. Problem of course is that you have little control over output heat so that a warm afternoon can be a problem. It was removed when we put heatpumps in about 10 years ago. I still have the nightstore if you are interested (in Christchurch).

robbyp
18-04-2010, 05:21 PM
I will keep the one on the modesty panel of my desk, because it is very effective against cold legs. However, I cannot imagine how they could heat a room.


Doesn't it say it heats a room 'up to' 3 m by 4 m, that is a very small room. I don't believe they are any more efficient than an oil heater, and oil heater offer more heat and are cheaper. It is amazing that because they heavily advertise, that people buy them. A bit like those home ventilation systems. Nightstore heater I don't think are particually efficient either, the advatage of those is you can use them to use offpeak electricity, which may work out cheaper. The most efficient way to heat you house is a heat pump, or using the sun.

Nomad
18-04-2010, 05:40 PM
Doesn't it say it heats a room 'up to' 3 m by 4 m, that is a very small room. I don't believe they are any more efficient than an oil heater, and oil heater offer more heat and are cheaper. It is amazing that because they heavily advertise, that people buy them. A bit like those home ventilation systems. Nightstore heater I don't think are particually efficient either, the advatage of those is you can use them to use offpeak electricity, which may work out cheaper. The most efficient way to heat you house is a heat pump, or using the sun.

Yeah it says 9m squared for the 260W one and 12m squared for the 400W one.

When we had the HRV guy came over, one of the heaters he suggested was maybe these panel heaters too :D and he was adamant it would heat a lounge up that required a 6kW heat pump.

I got my refund. I had it for maybe 3hrs on, it raised the temperture by 3 degrees, (I had a thermometer) or maybe not that cos my room get a bit of sun and my computer was on. 3 degrees was comparing my un-heated lounge.

Re: the 400W panel heater. That prob uses similar power to a 2.4kW heat pump, COP is over 4x for one of the Pana's, a few were over 5x.
If I left the 260W or 400W one on for 24/7 I would chew more power bills than a 2.4kW heat pump (!).

Nomad
18-04-2010, 05:46 PM
Neighbour has one of them. She said it was great until I found out what her winter power bill was. Massive.

If one has a day/night meter the night time rate is discounted, many nitestore heaters might be 2 or 3kW, per kW cost around 8c or 10c depending on your plan. So a 2kW = 20c an hour.

20c x 8hrs x 7days x4 weeks = $44.80, if you have 2 = $89.60 on top of your usuals which might be around $120-150 taking it to $230 a month :rolleyes:

robbyp
18-04-2010, 05:58 PM
Yeah it says 9m squared for the 260W one and 12m squared for the 400W one.

When we had the HRV guy came over, one of the heaters he suggested was maybe these panel heaters too :D and he was adamant it would heat a lounge up that required a 6kW heat pump.

I got my refund. I had it for maybe 3hrs on, it raised the temperture by 3 degrees, (I had a thermometer) or maybe not that cos my room get a bit of sun and my computer was on. 3 degrees was comparing my un-heated lounge.

Re: the 400W panel heater. That prob uses similar power to a 2.4kW heat pump, COP is over 4x for one of the Pana's, a few were over 5x.
If I left the 260W or 400W one on for 24/7 I would chew more power bills than a 2.4kW heat pump (!).

Aren't ventiallation company, and that heater company related in some way. If so they would recommend it for obvious reasons.

John H
18-04-2010, 06:01 PM
I don't think he was talking about Nitestor heaters. I think the OP means these:

http://www.econo-heat.co.nz/index.php

That's what I was talking about anyway.

Well, I don't recall what you were talking about - I was responding to martynz and others who were clearly talking about Nitestor heaters. You could hardly get a brick inside the econo-heat thing you have the url for!

John H
18-04-2010, 06:03 PM
If one has a day/night meter the night time rate is discounted, many nitestore heaters might be 2 or 3kW, per kW cost around 8c or 10c depending on your plan. So a 2kW = 20c an hour.

20c x 8hrs x 7days x4 weeks = $44.80, if you have 2 = $89.60 on top of your usuals which might be around $120-150 taking it to $230 a month :rolleyes:

What you also have to add to that for a nitestor heater is the cost of maintaining the damned things. Mine burned out two elements in 8 or so years, and they cost and arm and a leg to replace.

Nomad
18-04-2010, 06:23 PM
Aren't ventiallation company, and that heater company related in some way. If so they would recommend it for obvious reasons.

http://www.dvs.co.nz/index.php/pi_pageid/137