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View Full Version : What do you use to connect to the internet?



utopian201
08-04-2010, 04:42 PM
what combination of devices (if any) do you use?
Eg
adsl2+ modem and wireless router
all in one device etc

Also is it better to get separate devices (eg a separate modem + wireless router) or an all in one device (modem+wireless+switch)?

I'm keen on something all in one, if only so it uses one power jack, but I can't find an adsl modem + simultaneous N + gigabit ports.

Speedy Gonzales
08-04-2010, 04:46 PM
Modem/router with ethernet (dont use the wireless on it).

I would say its better if you get an all in one (if you're planning on sharing the net access with other PC's). Since its NOT that easy, getting things to work with a separate modem / router. It'll probably take twice as long to configure both properly.

wainuitech
08-04-2010, 04:47 PM
You should ask that question differently, not every one uses ADSL.

I use Telstra Cable modem - 4 Port wireless router, off of them a various number of switches along the way - total 4 - some 4 port, some 8 port. ( need some more as all ports are full :D )

All in one device modem/router for ADSL is better, as every thing is in the one place, and "hopefully" every thing will work together.

nedkelly
08-04-2010, 05:04 PM
I have ADSL modem to router then to my switch then patch panel to my room then my 24 port switch and then my computers.

I disagree with Speedy and Wainuitech saying that all in one devices are better, I prefer separate devices.

Speedy Gonzales
08-04-2010, 05:10 PM
I disagree with Speedy and Wainuitech saying that all in one devices are better, I prefer separate devices.

There's quite a few threads in here, with people who have had probs with a separate modem and router. No matter how hard they tried to get both to work together, they couldn't. In the end they brought an AIO. But different people have different opinions

wratterus
08-04-2010, 05:14 PM
It all depends on how much knowledge the end user has about networking. Trying to explain to someone the idea behind getting an ADSL Router and Access Point configured so they play nice together can be quite a pain. In this case, an AIO is far better. For a more advanced user, possibly having different devices could be better, depending on the setup. At home I have an AIO with wireless N, ethernet cabling around the house as well as a wireless G access point out the back. It all plays together nicely, but I know how to configure it correctly - your average home user doesn't and would find an AIO much more simple.

nedkelly
08-04-2010, 05:19 PM
Originally I was one of those people having problems with my setup but I figured it out. Also it would be a pain to wire it up if I had an AIO.

Speedy Gonzales
08-04-2010, 05:22 PM
What would be hard?? Just connect it (with ethernet, if thats what you use) thats it. I've got 3 PC's connected here with a modem/router. All get on the net, all share a folder (Vista 32/64 bit and Win7)

nedkelly
08-04-2010, 05:29 PM
I mean the physical wiring of an AIO would be hard. The Modem and router are in a room where the phone jack is in bottom top corner of the room and the patch panel is in the bottom left corner. Modem is right next to phone jack and router is in top left corner.

Speedy Gonzales
08-04-2010, 05:33 PM
Oh you mean there. Ok then. It'll probably be the same if I wanted to connect a dialup modem to one of these. Since this is 64 bit there are no drivers. It may work with Vista 32 bit across the room. But then I would have to buy a cable to connect from there to here (the jack is by my desk). Then I would have to enable ICS so all 3 can get on the net (the other PC is in the bedroom)

Jen
08-04-2010, 06:26 PM
I'm keen on something all in one, if only so it uses one power jack, but I can't find an adsl modem + simultaneous N + gigabit ports.What about this one Linksys WAG320N (http://www.ascent.co.nz/productspecification.aspx?ItemID=385071). I have no idea on whether that device is any good, just found it after a quick google. There also appear to be other Linksys device models that do the same thing.


I like the all-in-one as it is saves having multiple devices all over the desk.

utopian201
08-04-2010, 06:37 PM
What about this one Linksys WAG320N (http://www.ascent.co.nz/productspecification.aspx?ItemID=385071). I have no idea on whether that device is any good, just found it after a quick google. There also appear to be other Linksys device models that do the same thing.


I like the all-in-one as it is saves having multiple devices all over the desk.

Hi
Thanks, I actually have that one in mind as it is the one that closest meets my needs. However I have read bad things about Linksys on this board and that device is dual band but only one is active at any one time (eg, you can run either 2.4GHz OR 5GHz, but not both at the same time), unlike the wrt610N, but that lacks an adsl modem :(

I just dont understand why in the whole world of ADSL, there is no device which does everything;
Netgear makes a simultaneous N, ADSL modem with 100mbps (not gigabit)
The linksys wag320n is an ADSL modem with gigabit ports with dual band N (not simultaneous!).
The wrt610N is simultaneous N with gigabit but no modem!

So I think the only path to go is for multiple devices. But as you say, you'll have bits and pieces everywhere :)

Speedy Gonzales
08-04-2010, 06:44 PM
You probably wont find any that run @ 2.4 and 5 at the same time. Thats why it gives you 2 options.

KarameaDave
08-04-2010, 07:47 PM
Telstraclear modem>DL524(this supplies wireless)>HP Procurve 8 port switch(in bedroom)>3Com 16 port switch(in workshop)

Agent_24
08-04-2010, 08:20 PM
I use a single-port ethernet router, currently on a Dynalink RTA1320 but I have several I swap around for fun sometimes.

That connects to a D-link 5-Port Switch, which goes to one computer and a spare cable for my laptop, and then to another cable which runs to the other end of the house and connects to a Pheenet 8-Port switch that connects more computers and a printer.


I would rather use separate devices, if one has issues it's easier to bypass\replace that part of the network without losing network connectivity completely

utopian201
09-04-2010, 06:31 PM
with those 3rd party firmwares (eg tomato, DD-WRT, OpenWRT), can they be configured for per client data limits?
eg your ISP limits you to 10gb. Is it possible to have 3 computers to have their own data cap of 2.5gb -each-, and have another two sharing 2.5gb? (total 10gb)

Deimos
11-04-2010, 11:13 PM
I've got a Cisco 2825 router, 3Com 3CRWDR101A-75 ADSL router, and an SMC WGBR14-N Wireless n acecss point.

3Com router is set up as DMZ direct to the WAN port on the Cisco router

somebody
11-04-2010, 11:23 PM
ADSL Modem/Router (ISP supplied) -> WebGauge router (for per-device usage monitoring) -> Linksys router (as a wireless bridge and VPN node) -> Asus router (for the other end of the wireless bridge + NAS) -> My PC (via ethernet to the Asus router).

Chilling_Silence
11-04-2010, 11:43 PM
It is possible with the likes of a Tomato-based router to restrict per-MAC / IP.

That, and all the N-spec ADSL2+ All-in-One routers suck horribly. Get yourself a combination of ADSL2+ like an AM300 and a separate AP, or better still, stick with G-Wireless and get yourself a bigger antenna (Plus bump up the power with non-standard firmware on the likes of a WRT54GL). MUCH better and more reliable solution IMO.

WarNox
12-04-2010, 12:00 AM
I don't see the point of using an AIO if you know what you're doing :)

The ISP will generally give you a free modem, which will be s*** but will do the modem part fine. So use that as the modem and buy a wireless router to use for the internal networking stuff, dhcp, wireless etc. This can be set up in a few ways but it takes the load of the crappy free modem :) Also, buying a wireless router is cheaper than buying a wireless modem router.

My setup:
The Internet > RTA1320 (ie crappy modem) : Network A > WRT54G (DD-WRT) : Network B

utopian201
12-04-2010, 11:21 AM
I don't see the point of using an AIO if you know what you're doing :)

The ISP will generally give you a free modem, which will be s*** but will do the modem part fine. So use that as the modem and buy a wireless router to use for the internal networking stuff, dhcp, wireless etc. This can be set up in a few ways but it takes the load of the crappy free modem :) Also, buying a wireless router is cheaper than buying a wireless modem router.

My setup:
The Internet > RTA1320 (ie crappy modem) : Network A > WRT54G (DD-WRT) : Network B

I notice you're using DD-WRT there.
Is it possible to do this:
your ISP limits you to 10gb. Is it possible to have 3 computers to have their own data cap of 2.5gb -each-, and have another two sharing 2.5gb? (total 10gb)

The DD-WRT site doesn't seem to have screenshots of the configuration pages, so I'm not sure what options are available.

Chilling_Silence
12-04-2010, 12:17 PM
See my previous post, use Tomato-MOD, not DD-WRT

SolMiester
12-04-2010, 12:44 PM
It all depends on how much knowledge the end user has about networking. Trying to explain to someone the idea behind getting an ADSL Router and Access Point configured so they play nice together can be quite a pain. In this case, an AIO is far better. For a more advanced user, possibly having different devices could be better, depending on the setup. At home I have an AIO with wireless N, ethernet cabling around the house as well as a wireless G access point out the back. It all plays together nicely, but I know how to configure it correctly - your average home user doesn't and would find an AIO much more simple.

+1

nedkelly
15-04-2010, 11:38 AM
Hey utopian201 I found you a dual band Wireless router (sorry no modem), not sure on the model but it is a Belkin N+ Dualband Wireless Router $339 from HN, and looks like might be gigabit speeds for ethernet.

Edit: http://reviews.cnet.com/routers/belkin-n-wireless-router/4507-3319_7-33361546.html

utopian201
15-04-2010, 02:15 PM
hey, thanks
I've actually narrowed it down to either Netgear WNDR 3700 or Linksys 610N
Will probably get the Netgear as it is the same price (~$290) but it is faster.
Both have simultaneous N with gigabit ethernet :)

I'm guessing you dont have wireless? Also why do you prefer separate devices?

WarNox
15-04-2010, 02:20 PM
Don't get a Belkin, I've put in two recently as access points and both don't work properly. The network settings keep on resetting and can't do anything about it, on both units with the latest firmware.

Chilling_Silence
15-04-2010, 02:24 PM
I'm not a fan of the Linksys N-Gear, they're horribly unreliable IMO..

wratterus
15-04-2010, 02:33 PM
I'm not a fan of the Linksys N-Gear, they're horribly unreliable IMO..

+1

nedkelly
15-04-2010, 02:34 PM
Yeah I have wireless, 3 networks actually. I can not have an AIO due to the placement of the phone jack and all my other gear.
See this post: http://pressf1.co.nz/showpost.php?p=897045&postcount=16
And also the fact I have replacements for the router and modem so if one of them dies I can replace them right away. Dont have any AIOs to replace a dead one with, and to get one I would have to drive down to the shore.

utopian201
15-04-2010, 05:40 PM
Don't get a Belkin


I'm not a fan of the Linksys N-Gear

Hhmm, so if not Belkin, Linksys or Netgear, there isnt much else out there.
D-Link and Dynalink then...?

Agent_24
15-04-2010, 07:47 PM
This is how I'd do it:

1) Decide what features you want, narrow down your results to all devices that include them
2) Look at the configuration page\utility of each device and decide if it suits you. There's nothing worse than trying to configure something through an interface designed by a medieval torture specialist.
3) By now you should have a few devices left, pick the one with the best quality hardware (cooling vents included) The bottom line here is pretty much does it use decent capacitors or not? Where decent generally = made in Japan

End result:

You have a device that does what you need, is easy to manage and will last a long time. What more could you want?

Chilling_Silence
15-04-2010, 11:40 PM
Hhmm, so if not Belkin, Linksys or Netgear, there isnt much else out there.
D-Link and Dynalink then...?

Pretty much.

If it's N-Wireless I'd go for NetComm (Dynalink), Draytek, or the Apple Airport. Nothing else.

You may be surprised at how the Airport Express / Extreme works, I loved my Express when I had it back in the day .... :D
http://www.apple.com/nz/wifi/
http://www.pbtech.co.nz/index.php?item=NETNCMNP802

Chilling_Silence
16-04-2010, 12:06 AM
3) By now you should have a few devices left, pick the one with the best quality hardware (cooling vents included) The bottom line here is pretty much does it use decent capacitors or not? Where decent generally = made in Japan

A well put post.

Definitely agree about the quality of the hardware. Unfortunately for some odd reason, much of the N-Wireless AP hardware that's available today is just nowhere near as reliable as it should be. Granted the standard was in draft form for some time, but still, it's a shame to see that so many manufacturers (Linksys, my personal favorite included) missed the mark so badly. The WRT160N for example is crap, constantly overheating, restarting, and sometimes even permanently failing :(

G-Wireless gear by almost all the manufacturers is *significantly* better and more reliable, though some surprisingly more-so than others :devil

nedkelly
16-04-2010, 12:07 AM
OMG someone else recommended the Airport?
Just a tip go for the extreme not express.
Extreme has more features.
I love my express as well.

utopian201
16-04-2010, 10:42 AM
Hhmm, well based on what I have read, the Apple Airport extreme doesn't have a web interface, QoS, WPS

Smallnetbuilder.com finds that D-link and Netgear have the fastest wireless performance.

Chilling_Silence
16-04-2010, 10:46 AM
I'm not sure who smallnetbuilder are, and they may be right, they may have marginally better performance, but I know I'd prefer one that stays up right the way through a file transfer than crashing half way through.
The Extreme has a "Guest Mode" which far surpasses WPS.
I've done dozens of wireless installs over the years and not once have I ever seen QoS on the wireless that actually works, in the 4-5 instances somebody actually tried to use it. It's a waste of time.

No WebGUI, everything is done from the PC in a nice wizard-style interface.

utopian201
16-04-2010, 02:24 PM
What gear do you use Chilling?

Agent_24
16-04-2010, 02:35 PM
How about one of these? http://www.myopenrouter.com/ (Netgear WNR3500L)

utopian201
16-04-2010, 03:38 PM
This is how I'd do it:

1) Decide what features you want, narrow down your results to all devices that include them
2) Look at the configuration page\utility of each device and decide if it suits you. There's nothing worse than trying to configure something through an interface designed by a medieval torture specialist.
3) By now you should have a few devices left, pick the one with the best quality hardware (cooling vents included) The bottom line here is pretty much does it use decent capacitors or not? Where decent generally = made in Japan

End result:

You have a device that does what you need, is easy to manage and will last a long time. What more could you want?

Well the few that -do- have the features I want are the Linksys WRT610N and Netgear WNDR3700, but they haven't been recommended on this forum.

The Linksys supports DD-WRT, while support is for OpenWRT is starting on the Netgear one...

Ive just purchased a modem to go with one of those so I'll have a look. At this point, it is probably going to be the Netgear since it offers better wireless performance, but it is priced about the same as the Linksys

Agent_24
16-04-2010, 03:49 PM
Maybe then it's best to get separate devices so you can have the features you want and with decent hardware too.

Chilling_Silence
17-04-2010, 01:11 AM
I use a Linksys AM300 in halfbridge to an Asus WL-520GU running Tomato.

I'm sticking with G-Wireless personally, but if I were doing any now I'd use the Linksys WRT54GL to run Tomato on. Similar price but the WL-520GU is no longer in production.

The AM300 is good, reliable, and syncs well. Only other replacement I'd consider would be the Draytek DV120, where it's even slightly more reliable than the AM300 (Have had the *odd* issue, but that's across dozens of customers without issues), although the DV120 syncs at a significantly slower speed than the AM300, which makes a difference when you're over 2KM from the Exchange (The difference between 3800kbps and 1500kbps I think if memory serves me correctly).

I'm going back to an Airport shortly, for use as an N-Wireless router, will keep the network separate from my G-Wireless. I couldn't bear to replace my Tomato AP with the QoS it does (Not on Wireless but on WAN traffic) and all the traffic accounting that it does for me too. My Tomato AP has been up 168 days now and counting ... Prior to that it only died due to reboot.
The only reason I sold my Airport Express in the first place was because I needed some quick cash back in the day, and had the Tomato AP in-place, using the Airport Express only to stream music to the stereo system...