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Nomad
09-03-2010, 04:01 PM
Hi, we had a visit for an assessment.

Rather than take his salesman talk. Anyone got one installed? Does it save much power bills? Does it become more warmer, how has winter been? How much heating do you still require?


Cheers.

Metla
09-03-2010, 04:07 PM
In winter the air in the roof space is colder, in summer its hotter, Why would you want to be colder in the winter and hotter in the summer?

And what madness tells a person that the air in their roof space is healthier then the air in their house? If you believe the air in your house is unhealthy then you have bigger problems then what an HRV can fix.

If you have a problem with poor circulation on your house then try an extractor fan.

R2x1
09-03-2010, 04:11 PM
HRV saves strain on your ceiling insulation by balancing the temperature on both sides whilst enriching the salesperson.

Nomad
09-03-2010, 04:24 PM
Note taken. Thanks.

He said that research says you save 60% in power bills by redistributing the heat. He also said that in winter there is still warm air up in the roof space.

We have some mould at the rear bedroom - what solution is available?

KarameaDave
09-03-2010, 04:27 PM
60%? I doubt it!!

R2x1
09-03-2010, 04:34 PM
Well beyond lies, dammed lies, then statistics, comes "research" results produced by sales persons.
Sell the sod a Harbour Bridge.

rebels181
09-03-2010, 06:25 PM
If you want to go down that road you might want look at some sort of heat exchanger system.
We have Moisture Master with a inline heater. This does take the chill of the air in the morning.I don't think its worth what we payed for it.
On the plus side my little girl hardly uses her pumps now and the house is a lot dryer to.Still have to use the fire in winter.
Have a look at some these sites (http://www.google.co.nz/#hl=en&source=hp&q=heat+exchanger+ventilation+systems&meta=&aq=2&oq=heat+exchanger&fp=ee2c1ba24d775546).

wainuitech
09-03-2010, 06:29 PM
We have ours installed for just on two years now. A lot has to do with the type of roof you have as well. A a tiled roof retains the heat better than a metal one, but of course takes longer to heat up.

When we got ours it was the start of a winter, out side was about 6 degrees - in the roof, ours was approx 17, the house was the same.

I went to a customers house just down the road, they have a metal roof, theirs was 27ish ( yes 10 higher) while inside they had the temp set to 20 - its was nice and warm, and NO fire or other heating.

Ours at the moment - See for your self (http://www.imagef1.net.nz/files/P1000994_.JPG) - the inside of the house is at 24, outside its about (guessing 12 - 14) during the night the lowest it drops to is 11-13 in the house. In fact quite often we have to switch it to cooling mode just to cool the place down.

The HRV 's push out the damp, so the place feels warmer anyway. The secret is to have enough outlets in enough rooms, and a big enough unit to handle it. As for cost -- never noticed the power usage increase.

Trev
09-03-2010, 07:03 PM
My brothers house in Tauranga has one and it works great. Went there at christmas time and the cool air coming through the vent at nighttime was wonderful. No need to have a window open. As wainui said you have differant modes a cooling mode for summer and a heating mode for winter. They also have a filter in them and a fan to push the air out. I would ignore the posts before rebels.
:)

Metla
09-03-2010, 07:13 PM
There is a difference between a system that just pushes air around and one with a heating unit.

I'll let everyone work it out for themselves but here's a hint...ones a heater.

And HRV have had at least one complaint upheld due to their claims.

If you do have a situation where your house is substantially colder then your roof space in the middle of winter then I would strongly suggest having another look at your ceiling insulation as that heat isn't coming from outside the house.

pine-o-cleen
09-03-2010, 07:21 PM
I had a rather attractive saleswoman turn up one day, after telling them that we'd get back to them. Just before she told me the price, she said "wow it's getting hot" and took off her jersey to reveal a rather snug fitting and cleavage showing top. I bet she sells a lot of HRV systems, just not to me. $2500 is a heck of a lot of money for a fan, a filter and a few outlets.

Positive pressure system my arse.

wainuitech
09-03-2010, 07:27 PM
Our next step is under Floor Installation, we are getting the Expol (http://www.expol.co.nz/) stuff.

Went to a persons place last winter, they had done about 1/3rd of the house at the time, AND had a HRV system installed, I noticed the difference between the area that was and wasn't done. Didn't actually cause a heat, but stopped all the draughty areas letting in the cold.

Edited: our next door neighbor had a DVS - got it taken out , put in an HRV and he said it woks a lot better. (Basically the same thing, but the HRV seems better)

Metla
09-03-2010, 07:56 PM
Edited: our next door neighbor had a DVS - got it taken out , put in an HRV and he said it woks a lot better. (Basically the same thing, but the HRV seems better)

Of course it seems better, They have more marketing....and they just spent a whack of money.

wainuitech
09-03-2010, 08:57 PM
Of course it seems better, They have more marketing....and they just spent a whack of money.Thats got nothing to do with it.

FACT:

The comment from the neighbor was made after he noticed an improvement. Their windows were usually wet even with the DVS, but after the HRV was installed there was a noticeable improvement.

FACT:

Our place is a hell of a lot drier, no where near the condensation on the windows we used to get, only time we now get any condensation is in the kitchen when SWMBO has been doing any cooking, and thats cleared after about an hour.
Edited: and that may even change now the range hood is actually working instead of sitting there looking pretty.

SO the fact it works in our place is all I need to know.

I know lots of people who think something is rubbish, and when the truth comes out, they have never tried or its only their belief from what others have said. IF those people they have tried something and it doesn't work for them, well thats to tough for them.
.

robbyp
09-03-2010, 09:25 PM
Hi, we had a visit for an assessment.

Rather than take his salesman talk. Anyone got one installed? Does it save much power bills? Does it become more warmer, how has winter been? How much heating do you still require?


Cheers.

We got a DVS abut 15 years ago. Have to say that it doesn't do much, apart from use up power. HOwever our house is a metal roof, and the ceilings are insulated, so it gets very cold up there in winter, and very hot in summer. I am surprised they said you can save up to 60% of power. You should get them to put that in writing, and if it doesn't they can remove it. The other thing you should be concerned about, is that it is pumping out air fromt eh roof space, which is dirty air, and if you have fibre glass batts, they potentially could go through the system. Personally I steer well clear of products that are heavily advertisied and by celebrities. If a product is any good, it should sell itself by word of mouth, or by normal marketing practises. Personally I think you would be better to invest in a heat pumb. You will certainly notice more of a heating and cooling difference with a heat pump.

Metla
09-03-2010, 09:47 PM
Thats got nothing to do with it.


If you say so.

Though If I removed a system and had it replaced with another almost identical system that done the exact same thing then I'd be telling people it was better as well.

Especially if I was suckered by advertising.

johcar
09-03-2010, 10:20 PM
I'm with Wainitech - we've had ours for about 4 years and the house is noticeably warmer in the winter (and when we need them, the heaters warm the rooms quicker too). We now get no condensation on the windows and the mould on the walls on the cold side of the house is gone.

60% savings in power is crap - but then I have two teenagers, so power savings of any kind would not be noticeable!! :D

CYaBro
10-03-2010, 04:42 AM
Why anyone would want to pump the dirty air from the ceiling into the house is beyond me.
Yes those systems have a filter but they don't stop everything. The best filter you can get is your lungs.
As someone said already you would be better to get a heat exchange system.

wainuitech
10-03-2010, 07:17 AM
If you say so.

Though If I removed a system and had it replaced with another almost identical system that done the exact same thing then I'd be telling people it was better as well.

Especially if I was suckered by advertising. I know so-- not say.

They had theirs in a year before ours - so we saw the results. If HRV was not better Please explain this then.

With the DVS, they had wet windows - as soon as the HRV was installed, within 5 days the windows had no more condensation, and its been that way ever since. The only thing that changed was the unit was a different brand installed.

SO if it wasn't better please explain why the change.

or do you think they put invisible little people in that run around drying everything before anyone gets up.

rebels181
10-03-2010, 07:42 AM
Why anyone would want to pump the dirty air from the ceiling into the house is beyond me.
Yes those systems have a filter but they don't stop everything. The best filter you can get is your lungs.
As someone said already you would be better to get a heat exchange system.

And those filers aren't cheap ether $90 for our one.
Need replacing every 12 months for the warranty.
Go down to the panel beaters give them a 6 pack for a roll of off cuts.

wmoore
10-03-2010, 07:56 AM
I know so-- not say.

They had theirs in a year before ours - so we saw the results. If HRV was not better Please explain this then.

With the DVS, they had wet windows - as soon as the HRV was installed, within 5 days the windows had no more condensation, and its been that way ever since. The only thing that changed was the unit was a different brand installed.

SO if it wasn't better please explain why the change.

or do you think they put invisible little people in that run around drying everything before anyone gets up.

The problem with DVS is that it only has one outlet while HRV (the company) and others have more than one outlet. All of those roof ones
work on the same principle, some are better than others, also if your roof is space is already damp or you have rising damp under the house, they won't do much good. A better system is a true HRV system from
http://www.cleanaire.co.nz/Home.html or someone similar.

wainuitech
10-03-2010, 08:11 AM
We looked at something similar to that but the only problem was the cost - WAY out of our price range. Sure you cant really put your health in $$ (maybe) but we got what we can afford.

Only thing about outside air being pulled in, we live next to a main road, it gets rather "heavy" sometimes. The filters would really need so major replacement often I suspect.

Metla
10-03-2010, 08:17 AM
or do you think they put invisible little people in that run around drying everything before anyone gets up.

Funny enough that was going to be my next best scenario.

Lmfao.

Cicero
10-03-2010, 08:32 AM
Beware the sceptic,when on a roll.

wainuitech
10-03-2010, 08:32 AM
The problem with DVS is that it only has one outlet When we had DVS trying to sell us theirs, the sales guy suggested at least 3 outlets (into the rooms) - BUT two rooms he reckoned they couldn't get an outlet to, because of the way the house is - he did say he could put one in a place and aim it towards the room "hopefully" it would get there - errrrrr no.

HRV guys said no worries, and did it right. Ever since we got it put in, the Mrs Asthma has gotten a lot less (almost none now), our place used to be damp in winter, not any more though, its a lot drier. As mentioned - Expol is the next thing to go in.

You still need the heating though, the systems are not meant to replace heating but they do help.
Wouldn't get a heat pump though, heard way to many complaints from people saying they suck power big time, one person I was talking to said their power bill tripled after theirs went in :eek: My sisters power bill went up quite a bit after her heat pump was installed as well.(last year)


Met's -- Well I think they must exist anyway - as like most places, its amazing when "things" happen and no one knows anything about it, or who didn't do something. :p

PinoyKiw
10-03-2010, 09:22 AM
Wouldn't get a heat pump though, heard way to many complaints from people saying they suck power big time, one person I was talking to said their power bill tripled after theirs went in :eek: My sisters power bill went up quite a bit after her heat pump was installed as well.(last year)

Heat pumps are strange beasts in regards to power bills. We got a heat pump a couple of winters back and while our power bill has gone up, we are still paying less per winter in heating using the heatpump alone than what we were paying before installing heat pumps.

Before heatpumping our house, we used gas, one heater was off the large outside bottle and 2 portable gas heaters in the house and one in my office.

Apart from the fact that we no longer have the dampness from the use of the gas, our energy bill is now less than it was before.

It also probably helps that we have a very good layer of pink batts through the roof space.

But I would agree that some people have gone down the heatpump route and have paid heaps more in there energy bills per year while others haven't had much or no increase, a lot I think depends on the installation of the heatpump and the construction/age of the house.

Cicero
10-03-2010, 09:50 AM
Mate leaves his on permanantly during winter @19c,his electricity bill has gone down.
We are of the opinion that the walls etc don't have to be reheated all the time,using on and off system.

robbyp
10-03-2010, 03:09 PM
or do you think they put invisible little people in that run around drying everything before anyone gets up.

Could just be different weather conditions at the time, or the peoplewho installed the original DVS made a stuff up and didn't install it properly. The actual parts to set up a dvs /hrv system (they are essentially advertising the same features), are quite cheap, so an experienced DIYer could setup such a system. I know a DIYer who setup their own heat exchange system successfully.

Has there been any testing on DVS and HRV systems, and how well they actually work. I would have though consumer would have done some reallly good testing, say over a year.

Nomad
10-03-2010, 04:18 PM
Regardless, folks are a bit skeptic.

They are still interested in a heat pump :D
They want to compare prices for say lounge alone or incl the bedrooms.

One of the things they want is heat, they want to get rid of any other heating appliance. They also want a cold temperature in summer.

We are just getting some quotes from diff suppliers.

Trev
10-03-2010, 04:23 PM
Extract from Consumer.
Our advice.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

An automatic ventilation system is much more effective and convenient than using a dehumidifier. And it's much more convenient than having to open and shut windows.

Any of the three types - forced-air, solar-powered or heat-exchanger - can be very effective. Your choice will depend on the type of house you live in, your location, and your budget.

Heat-exchanger systems are the best option, if you can afford it. They'll work in any situation, provided they're properly designed and installed. But there's a limited choice of heat-exchangers - all the models we found came from the same supplier.

Make sure you're getting the genuine product. The HRV system implies it's a heat-exchanger. But it's only able to recover what heat is in the roof space.

Heat-exchanger systems come in many sizes - and they have many options, including extra outlets. They should be designed to suit the size and style of your house.

Solar-powered systems will be effective anywhere that has enough sunshine - which means most parts of New Zealand. And they will always have the lowest running costs.

Forced-air systems will work in any house that has a warm dry roof space. But if your roof is heavily shaded or you live in a colder part of the country, a heater will be essential for ensuring adequate airflow without cold draughts. You may also have to fit small vents or leave windows slightly ajar on security stays to achieve sufficient air movement to fully control condensation.

You don't have a roof space? Two forced-air systems - Moisture Master and DVS - offer units with a heater that work on outside air. Also consider a Vent Axia through-the-wall style heat exchanger system.

Consider whether you want a unit with simple controls or a more sophisticated model that allows you to set the cut-out and cut-in temperatures, and so on. You'll pay a lot more for a fancy system, but won't necessarily get any better ventilation.

Always choose suppliers who are familiar with your local climate, and get at least two competitive quotes.

:)

lakewoodlady
10-03-2010, 04:34 PM
Neighbour has HRV that her landlord had installed in the house. She only uses a gas heater in the Winter normally. Her power bills went up and she still has to use the gas heater. She is on a benefit and can't always afford to pay the bills, so the landlord did her no favors by putting it in. He would have been better to install a heat pump I think. The HRV was a slightly cheaper option in his case but he is all for saving a dollar that one. So my neighbour has to put up with higher bills and no heating and the place still gets damp because of her gas heater!
I must add also, that in the Summer, the HRV pumps warm air down from the ceiling and it becomes like an oven in there if she doesn't open all the doors and windows.

LL :illogical

robbyp
10-03-2010, 04:39 PM
Regardless, folks are a bit skeptic.

They are still interested in a heat pump :D
They want to compare prices for say lounge alone or incl the bedrooms.

One of the things they want is heat, they want to get rid of any other heating appliance. They also want a cold temperature in summer.

We are just getting some quotes from diff suppliers.

An HRV isn't a heating system, nor is it an air conditioner. It's main purpose is to reduce condensation, and reduce the amount of moisture in the air. ALso I beleive an HRV type of system only works properly if the whole house is done, as it relies on supposed pressure differences between indside and out, and the roof space. Otherwise havind a door open in the house could disrupt it. I do recall that one of these companies got in trouble a few years ago regarding how they were marketing the systems.
From your folks requirements, a heat pump could be the best solution, as they are more energy efficient than a conventional heater. You may also be able to get a grant towards one.

robbyp
10-03-2010, 04:41 PM
Neighbour has HRV that her landlord had installed in the house. She only uses a gas heater in the Winter normally. Her power bills went up and she still has to use the gas heater. She is on a benefit and can't always afford to pay the bills, so the landlord did her no favors by putting it in. He would have been better to install a heat pump I think. The HRV was a slightly cheaper option in his case but he is all for saving a dollar that one. So my neighbour has to put up with higher bills and no heating and the place still gets damp because of her gas heater!
I must add also, that in the Summer, the HRV pumps warm air down from the ceiling and it becomes like an oven in there if she doesn't open all the doors and windows.

LL :illogical

SOunds like they have got a metal roof. Supposedly it works better for cooling at night, with a title roof.

Nomad
10-03-2010, 04:42 PM
Ok my rant.

The guy said our house is like a wet cardboard box and needs the HRV to suck that out. He said a heat pump was just a large fan heater, haha. He did say how does it feel to pay 60% less power bills? Do you want that or a $4,000 heat pump in the main lounge and one in each of the other rooms. He said that heat pumps doesn't dehumidify or clean the air.

He did mention that if in winter it is 3.9 degrees when you wake up. The HRV system would bring it up to 16 degrees so you only need a fraction amount of heating to get it to 20 degrees.

:D

lakewoodlady
10-03-2010, 04:43 PM
An HRV isn't a heating system, nor is it an air conditioner. It's main purpose is to reduce condensation, and reduce the amount of moisture in the air. ALso I beleive an HRV type of system only works properly if the whole house is done, as it relies on supposed pressure differences between indside and out, and the roof space. Otherwise havind a door open in the house could disrupt it. I do recall that one of these companies got in trouble a few years ago regarding how they were marketing the systems.
From your folks requirements, a heat pump could be the best solution, as they are more energy efficient than a conventional heater. You may also be able to get a grant towards one.


Best thing I ever did was get a heatpump. Power bills went down in the Winter. I have it on Ac now and it is really nice. No more asthma due to humidity. Only wish is that I had it in the bedrooms too!

LL :banana

robbyp
10-03-2010, 04:44 PM
Extract from Consumer.
Our advice.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

An automatic ventilation system is much more effective and convenient than using a dehumidifier. And it's much more convenient than having to open and shut windows.

Any of the three types - forced-air, solar-powered or heat-exchanger - can be very effective. Your choice will depend on the type of house you live in, your location, and your budget.

Heat-exchanger systems are the best option, if you can afford it. They'll work in any situation, provided they're properly designed and installed. But there's a limited choice of heat-exchangers - all the models we found came from the same supplier.

Make sure you're getting the genuine product. The HRV system implies it's a heat-exchanger. But it's only able to recover what heat is in the roof space.

Heat-exchanger systems come in many sizes - and they have many options, including extra outlets. They should be designed to suit the size and style of your house.

Solar-powered systems will be effective anywhere that has enough sunshine - which means most parts of New Zealand. And they will always have the lowest running costs.

Forced-air systems will work in any house that has a warm dry roof space. But if your roof is heavily shaded or you live in a colder part of the country, a heater will be essential for ensuring adequate airflow without cold draughts. You may also have to fit small vents or leave windows slightly ajar on security stays to achieve sufficient air movement to fully control condensation.

You don't have a roof space? Two forced-air systems - Moisture Master and DVS - offer units with a heater that work on outside air. Also consider a Vent Axia through-the-wall style heat exchanger system.

Consider whether you want a unit with simple controls or a more sophisticated model that allows you to set the cut-out and cut-in temperatures, and so on. You'll pay a lot more for a fancy system, but won't necessarily get any better ventilation.

Always choose suppliers who are familiar with your local climate, and get at least two competitive quotes.

:)


Yeah, but they haven't actually done any scientific testing. That article does also highlight that the ventilation system is a replacement for a dehumidifier, not a replacement for a heatpump. If they want to sell their mag, they should, and I am sure a lot of people woul;d be interested in the results.

Nomad
10-03-2010, 04:45 PM
Addition, folks like the doors and windows open.

Trev
10-03-2010, 05:50 PM
Neighbour has HRV that her landlord had installed in the house. She only uses a gas heater in the Winter normally. Her power bills went up and she still has to use the gas heater. She is on a benefit and can't always afford to pay the bills, so the landlord did her no favors by putting it in. He would have been better to install a heat pump I think. The HRV was a slightly cheaper option in his case but he is all for saving a dollar that one. So my neighbour has to put up with higher bills and no heating and the place still gets damp because of her gas heater!
I must add also, that in the Summer, the HRV pumps warm air down from the ceiling and it becomes like an oven in there if she doesn't open all the doors and windows.

LL :illogical
Heating in the summer ? I would say your neighbour has it on the wrong setting for the summer. They have a heating mode and a cooling mode. In summer they bring the cool air down from the ceiling at night time and in the winter bring the warm air down. You have a panel in the wall to set them up.
:)

Metla
10-03-2010, 06:07 PM
In summer they bring the cool air down from the ceiling at night time


Because the cool air rises into the ceiling?

Or is it cooler in the ceiling cavity ?, meaning that's where the cold air is in winter...which you then pump into your living area to keep warm?

Wait, None of this makes sense, Its contradictory, best I read some slick marketing.

In the meantime I'll keep the warm air in my house during winter by insulation, and dispel hot air during summer by ventilation, and the crap in the roof cavity can stay there.

Trev
10-03-2010, 06:15 PM
Why is it that the people who don't have these products whether HRV or Heatpumps etc degrade them without trying them out. I don't have a HRV system but know 2 people who have and are very happy with it. I do have a Heatpump and are very happy with it but could do with a bigger unit. I know at least 6 people with Heatpumps and are very happy with them also.
:)

R2x1
10-03-2010, 06:17 PM
For God's sake, stop using logic and listen to the marketing. We have a National Government, that carries responsibilities for each of us to patronise these highly promoted products.

Metla
10-03-2010, 06:26 PM
Why is it that the people who don't have these products whether HRV or Heatpumps etc degrade them without trying them out.


Because its merely a fan, a very expensive fan. Besides which the claims don't make any sense. I would have to acknowledge that in some bizarre cases people are getting some of the claimed benefits but she stinks of snake-oil to me.

wainuitech
10-03-2010, 06:32 PM
I must add also, that in the Summer, the HRV pumps warm air down from the ceiling and it becomes like an oven in there if she doesn't open all the doors and windows.

LL :illogical it must be set up wrong, or your location in the part of the country and roof is hotter. It needs adjusting - thats all.

you can turn them off you know - if its pumping hot air in at night, then adjust the temp on the scale so its higher than the roof, or as high as it will go and it wont pump. This here (http://www.imagef1.net.nz/files/P1000996_.JPG) was taken at about 11pm last night - it was 10 degrees out side, so the roof is cooling down, and notice its on cooling mode,its set to 22, but still has1 degree to go - if I lowered the temp down to 18, it would keep cooling till it got to that 18 as long as the roof temp was 18 or below. Once they get to the set temp, they turn themselves off.

As for heating during the winter -- The car port is half full - just one more load to come, then stack it away :D

lakewoodlady
10-03-2010, 06:38 PM
it must be set up wrong, or the location in the part of teh country and roof is hotter. It needs adjusting - thats all.

you can turn them off you know - if its pumping hot air in at night, then adjust the temp on the scale so its higher than the roof, or as high as it will go and it wont pump. This here (http://www.imagef1.net.nz/files/P1000996_.JPG) was taken at about 11pm last night - it was 10 degrees out side, so the roof is cooling down, and notice its on cooling mode,its set to 22, but still has1 degree to go - if I lowered the temp down to 18, it would keep cooling till it got to that 18. Once they get to the set temp, they turn themselves off.

As for heating during the winter -- The car port is half full - just one more load to come :D

I have said to her that the setting must be wrong but no matter what she tries it all seems to come out wrong. Still think it is a mistake that her landlord didn't put in a heatpump as we all suggested!

Oh well, she may not be there much longer as she has had an offer of somewhere a lot cheaper.

LL

PPp
10-03-2010, 07:48 PM
We had a really great system. Admittedly we have an enclosed log burner, but that only worked in the lounge. I went along to Bunnings and got the cheapest system they had, it pumped ceiling air in the lounge via a 38watt fan to two rooms at the far end of the house using cheap insulated piping. After the fire is started and the fan started the other end of the house gradually warms up and heat is pushed back to the lounge through the rest of the house making the whole house cosy.( just as well, as the room with the computer is no longer brass monkey country for internet sessions in winter). All I have to do now is get an electrician in to install a switch, rather than using an extension cord through the ceiling access. We do have very good insulation though, so I guess that keeps the heat from escaping too.

Terry Porritt
10-03-2010, 08:34 PM
We had a really great system. Admittedly we have an enclosed log burner, but that only worked in the lounge. I went along to Bunnings and got the cheapest system they had, it pumped ceiling air in the lounge via a 38watt fan to two rooms at the far end of the house using cheap insulated piping. After the fire is started and the fan started the other end of the house gradually warms up and heat is pushed back to the lounge through the rest of the house making the whole house cosy.( just as well, as the room with the computer is no longer brass monkey country for internet sessions in winter). All I have to do now is get an electrician in to install a switch, rather than using an extension cord through the ceiling access. We do have very good insulation though, so I guess that keeps the heat from escaping too.

That's the sort of system I put in, a 'Weiss' from Mitre10 a few years ago, and there is a thermostat for setting when it switches on and off.
It works really well during the winter distributing warm air around the house from the lounge, and keeps my computer/electronics room, which has a south wall, quite warm.

robbyp
10-03-2010, 08:53 PM
I have said to her that the setting must be wrong but no matter what she tries it all seems to come out wrong. Still think it is a mistake that her landlord didn't put in a heatpump as we all suggested!

Oh well, she may not be there much longer as she has had an offer of somewhere a lot cheaper.

LL


It would definitely not be setup right, as it does have a thermostat in it, that should turn it off in that situation.

robbyp
10-03-2010, 08:54 PM
We had a really great system. Admittedly we have an enclosed log burner, but that only worked in the lounge. I went along to Bunnings and got the cheapest system they had, it pumped ceiling air in the lounge via a 38watt fan to two rooms at the far end of the house using cheap insulated piping. After the fire is started and the fan started the other end of the house gradually warms up and heat is pushed back to the lounge through the rest of the house making the whole house cosy.( just as well, as the room with the computer is no longer brass monkey country for internet sessions in winter). All I have to do now is get an electrician in to install a switch, rather than using an extension cord through the ceiling access. We do have very good insulation though, so I guess that keeps the heat from escaping too.

Nothing wrong with log burners, and if you are using your own wood, it would be considered by many as 'green' heating.

robbyp
10-03-2010, 08:58 PM
Why is it that the people who don't have these products whether HRV or Heatpumps etc degrade them without trying them out. I don't have a HRV system but know 2 people who have and are very happy with it. I do have a Heatpump and are very happy with it but could do with a bigger unit. I know at least 6 people with Heatpumps and are very happy with them also.
:)

You do notice more from getting a heat pump, because it actually heats and cools the house, and is a heater replacement. A DVS or HRV is a ventilation product, and not designed to be a heater or cooler, they are mainly designed to get rid of condensation, and are a dehumidifier replacement, not a replacement for a heat pump. The fact that it may heat or cool in certain situations, is just a bonus.

Nomad
11-03-2010, 12:40 PM
You do notice more from getting a heat pump, because it actually heats and cools the house, and is a heater replacement. A DVS or HRV is a ventilation product, and not designed to be a heater or cooler, they are mainly designed to get rid of condensation, and are a dehumidifier replacement, not a replacement for a heat pump. The fact that it may heat or cool in certain situations, is just a bonus.

The dude said in winter it might be 3.9 degrees when you wake up. The HRV system raises the temp to 16 so you need minimal heating to get it to 20 degrees. He says in winter there will be substantial heating up in the roof space.

For the 60% saving power bills, it is also in their brochures, he says NZ universities research has proven it. And that HRV sells the most in Southland and Otago and that Otago uni recently installed 50 student flats with them in it. :clap

rebels181
11-03-2010, 12:51 PM
Our inline heater is set to turn on when the roof temp drops to 12 deg C.
Turns on about 5pm turns off at 9:30am - 11:00am
If we have the fire going it will turn about 9:00pm.

robbyp
11-03-2010, 04:01 PM
The dude said in winter it might be 3.9 degrees when you wake up. The HRV system raises the temp to 16 so you need minimal heating to get it to 20 degrees. He says in winter there will be substantial heating up in the roof space.

For the 60% saving power bills, it is also in their brochures, he says NZ universities research has proven it. And that HRV sells the most in Southland and Otago and that Otago uni recently installed 50 student flats with them in it. :clap


You will need him to put that in writing, because that sounds impossible. Where is that heat coming from, because the rook space doesn't magically create heat, and in winter the roof space is often almost as cold as outside, as the roof space is not insulated from the outside.
Do they actually have this university paper to show you to prove those findings. They maybe taking the figures out of context. Maybe they said 'up to' 60%. Our DVS certainly doesn't do any of that. SOme brands have heater attachments, but it costs more to run those, and it is more efficient to pump heat in from the floor, due to heat rising.