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View Full Version : purchase desktop pc help?



hammer
03-03-2010, 01:13 PM
friend into photography & graphic design has 2k to spend on pc desktop box

would like any advise you can give

thanks

hammer
03-03-2010, 02:15 PM
would this be a suitable one..

im thinking gaming has similar requirements to graphics etc

http://www.qmb.co.nz/dealer/pk.aspx?389&c=Package

Battleneter2
03-03-2010, 02:54 PM
sorry your link doesnt work, looks like you need to be logged in.

Suggest copy and pasting the stats.

nedkelly
03-03-2010, 03:07 PM
just remove /dealer from address and it does

autechre
04-03-2010, 08:51 AM
I'd probably go for 4GB of RAM & Win7 64bit - photo editing can gobble RAM & i'd imagine GD would be the same.

Depending on how into their photography they are, the AOC monitor is pretty low end. If they're really concerned about viewing & editing with accurate colours, then get one with a PVA or IPS panel in it rather than a TN. The only problem is they're more expensive.

wratterus
04-03-2010, 09:07 AM
Highly recommend one of ComputerLounge's systems.

http://www.computerlounge.co.nz/systems/systemdetail.asp?sysid=122&systypeid=4

utopian201
04-03-2010, 09:53 AM
would this be a suitable one..

im thinking gaming has similar requirements to graphics etc

http://www.qmb.co.nz/dealer/pk.aspx?389&c=Package

Its actually the complete opposite... Graphics and video editing programs, as they are not DirectX or OpenGL dependent, have little benefit from discrete video cards. Integrated graphics + $400 CPU is faster than $200 graphics card + $200 CPU when it comes to video editing/graphic design

Lose the graphics card and speakers, and use the money saved on a better monitor, 64bit windows and more memory (your configuration only has 2gb so far i think)

I second the suggestion about a monitor; if they are serious about graphic design, I'd recommend an IPS screen, eg HP LP2475W, Dell U2410.

Copied from a previous post:
You can check which panel a certain screen has here:
http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/panelsearch.htm
The main LCD panel types are:
TN: Lowest cost, worst viewing angles and colour reproduction, low image processing lag. Apparently best for fast paced gaming, worst for image editing and professsional work where colour accuracy is important. TN panels can only display 262k colours natively and use dithering to display 16.7m.

*VA (MVA, PVA, S-PVA): Middle of the road, better viewing angles and colour reproduction, typically high image processing lag (as high as 64ms!). Typically best black levels and contrast. Can display 16.7m colours but unfortunately (or fortunately if you're a design professional) most newer panels of this type are wide gamut, meaning sRGB images are oversaturated in non colour managed applications. Can suffer from slight horizontal contrast shift (like TN's vertical contrast shift, but not as obvious)

IPS (S-IPS, H-IPS): Most expensive technology, viewing angles and colour reproduction almost as good as (or even better than) that of a CRT, medium image processing (between 20-40ms). Almost all are wide gamut (which is a disadvantage, or an advantage depending on how you look at it). No contrast shift.

All panel types have similar response times so ghosting is not really a problem anymore. Although some panels use overdrive, so you get a 'negative' ghosting effect, depending on the background eg on the TN (viewsonic 22") I'm using now, there is a slight ghosting trail, which isn't noticable on my IPS screen. So in this instance, TN has worse ghosting than IPS, even though the TN has a "quicker" documented (5ms for TN, 6ms for IPS) response time.

SolMiester
04-03-2010, 10:18 AM
An SSD drive will certain help with temp file creation and manipulation for photos.....and RAM, RAM RAM

whellington
04-03-2010, 10:45 AM
http://www.computerlounge.co.nz/systems/systemdetail.asp?sysid=38&systypeid=2

+ http://www.playtech.co.nz/afawcs0139235/CATID=257/ID=9964/SID=1059132209/productdetails.html

+ keyboard mouse

Battleneter2
04-03-2010, 12:36 PM
Its actually the complete opposite... Graphics and video editing programs, as they are not DirectX or OpenGL dependent,

You may want to rethink that a little times are changing.

http://www.opengl.org/news/comments/opengl_support_for_adobe_after_effects/

pablo d
04-03-2010, 01:01 PM
I'm testing a cPVA panel atm:

http://www.playtech.co.nz/afawcs0139235/CATID=/ID=9967/SID=1059132209/productdetails.html

Excellent viewing angles.
Excellent contrast/blacks.
100% sRGB colour space.
Supposed to have ultra low processing lag too but haven't got around to personally testing that, yet.

VERY frigging nice screen considering it's only ~$100 more than a decent TN panel. Only downside is 8ms response time - I know this rating doesn't mean much on paper but in actual use it does translate to noticable ghosting.

sroby
04-03-2010, 03:08 PM
Its actually the complete opposite... Graphics and video editing programs, as they are not DirectX or OpenGL dependent, have little benefit from discrete video cards. Integrated graphics + $400 CPU is faster than $200 graphics card + $200 CPU when it comes to video e

No longer true. NV,ATI GPU can now be used in video editing -offload from CPU to GPU (encoding/decoding) and this will become more common as the year progresses.

utopian201
05-03-2010, 10:43 AM
You may want to rethink that a little times are changing.

http://www.opengl.org/news/comments/opengl_support_for_adobe_after_effects/

A video card will only help the OP if they are using adobe after effects.


No longer true. NV,ATI GPU can now be used in video editing -offload from CPU to GPU (encoding/decoding) and this will become more common as the year progresses.

Yes, you can use the GPU to encode videos. But if you have seen the results, CPU still gives better quality at the same bitrate. For me, quality trumps the time required everytime. You only encode once, but the resulting video file is watched many times.