PDA

View Full Version : Recommend a Linux Distribution for me.



Sweep
15-02-2010, 10:48 PM
Currently running Win 7 Pro 64 bit on an AMD Athlon X2 4400+ with 2 Gig RAM. I have Mint 8 and I was just going to install when I noted that it does not support my Creative X-Fi sound card. It also said there was no O/S installed on my PC currently which I thought was rather strange.

I have 2 x 200 Gig Seagate SATA drives and an empty 80 Gig IDE drive. Linux will be installed on the empty drive. The 200 gig drives are not to be used as one is a copy of the other for backup purposes.

I want to dual boot Win 7 and the version of Linux I finish up with.

The main reason I want to get into Linux is so I can use GCC or similar to write programs and compile into stand alone applications.

I also have an IDE DVD writer and know how to download and burn an ISO.

Speedy Gonzales
15-02-2010, 10:51 PM
You need a bloody degree to install Mint lol. I tried it a few weeks ago. Talk about bloody annoying. It was worse than trying to install Ubuntu. At least I didnt have to figure out what the install was talking about. And I managed to install and update it (prior to 9.10). Since this is buggy as

Sweep
15-02-2010, 10:57 PM
Well it sort of worked as a live CD but I want something I can add to as my needs grow etc. I want to be able to listen to music while writing programs but as I said it would mostly be for compiling.

Netsukeninja
15-02-2010, 11:11 PM
Mint is good, but if you want something rock solid, get Debian.

Cato
15-02-2010, 11:18 PM
OpenSuSE FTW!!!

Or Fedora if you prefer KDE.

Sweep
15-02-2010, 11:54 PM
Mint is good, but if you want something rock solid, get Debian.

Mint is crap. I thought I already said that I tried Mint 8.

Sweep
16-02-2010, 12:12 AM
Well so far I have recommendations for Debian, OpenSuse and possibly Fedora (If I want KDE)

I do have a printed book for Redhat Linux for dummies Ver 7.3 BTW.

I don't mind using a command line interface at times.

It I program then syntax is very important or it won't compile will it!

KarameaDave
16-02-2010, 12:37 AM
try this
http://pclinuxos.com/?page_id=10
or this
https://www.mepis.org/
or indeed
http://www.archlinux.org/
all three are capable and hopefully
one will support your sound card

linux driver for xifi card here
http://opensource.creative.com/soundcard.html

good luck

Sweep
16-02-2010, 12:51 AM
OK. Tried the PClinux link and I note:-
Sound card
Any Sound Blaster, AC97 or HDA compatible card.

Creative Labs X-Fi cards are not currently supported.

So goodbye to that one. I do, in fact read before I download.

I will check the other two you mention.

KarameaDave
16-02-2010, 01:00 AM
I note the driver for your card is in beta status
in the last link in my post.
This suggests to me that it
will not have been assimilated into the Linux kernel yet.
So maybe none will support it out of the box, so to speak.
your first compilation task may be the sound card driver.

Sweep
16-02-2010, 01:10 AM
Simply Mepis 64 bit seems to have been released in 2007 so I see.

Sweep
16-02-2010, 01:15 AM
I note the driver for your card is in beta status
in the last link in my post.
This suggests to me that it
will not have been assimilated into the Linux kernel yet.
So maybe none will support it out of the box, so to speak.
your first compilation task may be the sound card driver.

OK. I have no problems doing compiles etc.

I am now thinking about pulling the plugs on my two SATA drives and just leave the 80 gig IDE drive when I install from the ISO I download.

No dual boot but I can live with that for the time being.

Agent_24
16-02-2010, 01:26 AM
If you want to dual-boot you should install Windows first, that way Grub can configure it all for you.

fred_fish
16-02-2010, 01:29 AM
[url]http://wiki.debian.org/X-Fi[/urI

If you want to go debian, testing is a bit broken at the moment due to a pending freeze in the next few months, so I would recommend stable (Lenny) with the 2.6.30 kernel from backports.

Depends on your other hardware & any version requirements for specific software though...

Sweep
16-02-2010, 01:34 AM
If you want to dual-boot you should install Windows first, that way Grub can configure it all for you.

Sigh.

Had you not noticed that I have Win 7 64 bit bit Pro installed already as I said in my first post?

Mint thought I had no OS installed.

Sweep
16-02-2010, 01:37 AM
http://wiki.debian.org/X-Fi

OK. So should I install a debian based Linux?

Preferably a 64 bit distribution BTW.

fred_fish
16-02-2010, 01:48 AM
Of course!
Everyone should install debian :)
If your network hardware is supported by the installer grab the -amd64 netinstall disk.
Some newer stuff is not, if so, get the full CD or download the drivers before you start.

EDIT: Gnome is the default DE for CD1, others KDE, LXDE, XFCE etc are on other CD's or installable from the package manager.
The netinst is nice as it starts really minimal you can add only what you want.

Sweep
16-02-2010, 02:02 AM
Of course!
Everyone should install debian :)
If your network hardware is supported by the installer grab the -amd64 netinstall disk.
Some newer stuff is not, if so, get the full CD or download the drivers before you start.

OK.................................

Currently downloading PCLinux but I do have another box on which I could install a version of Linux.

Soltek SL-75FRN2 motherboard with an AMD 2600+ processor and a 20 Gig hard drive and on board sound and CD writer.

pkm
16-02-2010, 08:28 AM
Ubuntu or debian since the community is large. I tend to stay away from the main DEs because I have old slow hardware, so XFCE, LXDE , Fluxbox etc.

http://kmandla.wordpress.com/2009/02/25/one-week-at-100mhz-paradigm-shifts/


I learned alot by getting debian minimal and adding what I needed eg xorg fluxbox lxde rox-filer, compared to installing the latest ubuntu 9.10.

Coaster
16-02-2010, 09:44 AM
Simply Mepis 64 bit seems to have been released in 2007 so I see.

Mepis gets my vote.

Latest update on the servers:
File:SimplyMEPIS-CD_8.4.97-b5_64.iso 709548 KB 14/02/2010 5:13:00 p.m.

Erayd
16-02-2010, 07:45 PM
Another vote for Debian here. Note that none of the 'mainstream' distros have a toolchain or dev libraries installed by default, but they are almost always available in the repositories.

Out of interest, what kind of software are you writing?

I'd also highly recommend Gentoo, but only if you're happy with a near-vertical learning curve (unless you're already intimately familiar with the innards of a linux-based OS, which based on this thread I'd guess you're not). If you're in the mood for learning though, Gentoo can't be beaten :D.

Sweep
16-02-2010, 11:12 PM
Thanks for the input peoples. I'll have a go at the debian distro and see how I get on.

Erayd
17-02-2010, 12:14 AM
Thanks for the input peoples. I'll have a go at the debian distro and see how I get on.

Best of luck with it :D. One thing though - if your soundcard doesn't work out of the box, it might be an idea to update the kernel, as the drivers are clearly pretty new.

My understanding is that the driver for this card was merged to mainline in 2.6.31 (so most distros will not have this driver out of the box; 2.6.31 vanilla was only released in September) - as this is fairly recent, you'll need to pull the kernel package from the testing branch (which, for debian, is still very stable, particularly as regards the kernel - testing is *not* the same thing as the unstable or experimental branches). The testing kernel version is currently at 2.6.32+23.

Regarding the install process - if you get lost, just keep bashing enter (although you may want to keep a sharp eye out during the partitioning step to make sure it ends up installing to the right place). The defaults are generally prtty sane, so if you get lost you should end up with a basic, usable system with a Gnome DE.

Edit: Slight advocacy here - go with KDE, and avoid Gnome :thumbs:. Reasons (many of them) are available on request (warning: text wall).

Sweep
17-02-2010, 01:04 AM
Thanks for that Erayd. I'll scream for help if I need it. :-)

fred_fish
17-02-2010, 08:23 AM
Some good info and links here (http://forums.debian.net/viewtopic.php?f=30&t=47258)

Phil B
17-02-2010, 08:35 AM
I've basically given up with Linux, mainly cos of all the grief getting basic things to work properly. That said, I thought I saw somewhere a couple of weeks ago that the latest Ubuntu supported the X-fi cards

Sweep
17-02-2010, 08:45 AM
Thanks - Bookmarked.

Erayd
17-02-2010, 10:22 AM
...that the latest Ubuntu supported the X-fi cardsGood to know, although I can't say I'd recommend Ubuntu at all - Canonical seem to place far more value on "oooh, shiny!" than they do on shipping something stable. If it isn't broken out of the box, it will break a few months later after updating it :groan:.

Sweep
17-02-2010, 02:47 PM
Just an update. Debian installed and I'm currently using Iceweasel to post on PressF1.

More stuff to download yet though although it did find my soundcard and printer so that's a plus.

Erayd
17-02-2010, 03:09 PM
Great stuff :thumbs:.

Give us a yell if you need a hand with anything.