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argus
12-02-2010, 09:41 AM
Two of the big bugbears of getting a new computer with new OS are:

1. Finding lots of old applications need upgrading (not so bad) or are pronounced obsolete and succeeded by a completely new product with a price-tag to work in the new environment (much worse).

2. Realising that there may be a lot of confidential data on the old machine and ensuring it's all properly gone before sending it for recycling.

With that in mind I am seeking for my new Windows 7 system:

1. backup/restore utility to succeed (and preferably improve on) Norton Save & Restore without shelling out $US70 for the new Ghost 15.0. ""Did this answer your question?" says Symantec; well no, not the answer I wanted; a $10 upgrade wd have been nice.

2. secure erase tool. What I have been using on XP is the delete facility that comes with PGP (I think in the dim distant past I acquired PGP free or for minimal payment somewhere but I don't really need its other capabilities. And of course, totally new version offered for Windows 7)

Any recommendations for anything cheaper or preferably free, good and trustworthy?

And yes; I know the answer will be (again) junk Windows and come over to Linux where everything's free (libre and gratis). I am partway there. I have my old machine dual-booting Ubuntu and XP; being new to Windows 7, dual-booting that and Ubuntu is a challenge for another week:) In any case or the short-to-medium-term future, I will have a Windows 7 partition with files to be backed up and erased.

In fact the prospect of total migration to Linux (if it happens) brings the Windows backup & secure-delete problems even more to the fore and highlights the need to get something inexpensive or free, if I won't be using it for long.

Please advise.

argus
12-02-2010, 09:48 AM
BTW, my Windows 7 version is Home Premium on HP/Compaq hardware.

Speedy Gonzales
12-02-2010, 09:56 AM
You can use ccleaner's secure deletion option (options / settings). Change it to secure deletion on the right then select gutmann 35 passes. It'll just take a bit longer for it to remove whatever. When you click on run cleaner. Thats if youre talking about erasing files that are in the recycle bin

linw
12-02-2010, 09:57 AM
Do you want a file backup or imaging program?

Good freebies are Macrium Reflect free for imaging and GFI for files. If you get the paid for version of Macrium, it does both imaging and file backups.

There are lots more but you only need one!

If you google for secure erasers you will get heaps as well.

Who needs free Linux????

SolMiester
12-02-2010, 10:09 AM
Just use Windows 7 built in backup program, create image and data separately....

pctek
12-02-2010, 10:49 AM
1. backup/restore utility to succeed (and preferably improve on) Norton Save & Restore without shelling out $US70 for the new Ghost 15.0. .

I wouldn't use that now - it's no longer really Ghost.

I just bought the new Paragon Backup (does the images too) for $14.95 US.

nofam
12-02-2010, 11:11 AM
Two of the big bugbears of getting a new computer with new OS are:

1. Finding lots of old applications need upgrading (not so bad) or are pronounced obsolete and succeeded by a completely new product with a price-tag to work in the new environment (much worse).

2. Realising that there may be a lot of confidential data on the old machine and ensuring it's all properly gone before sending it for recycling.

With that in mind I am seeking for my new Windows 7 system:

1. backup/restore utility to succeed (and preferably improve on) Norton Save & Restore without shelling out $US70 for the new Ghost 15.0. ""Did this answer your question?" says Symantec; well no, not the answer I wanted; a $10 upgrade wd have been nice.

2. secure erase tool. What I have been using on XP is the delete facility that comes with PGP (I think in the dim distant past I acquired PGP free or for minimal payment somewhere but I don't really need its other capabilities. And of course, totally new version offered for Windows 7)

Any recommendations for anything cheaper or preferably free, good and trustworthy?

And yes; I know the answer will be (again) junk Windows and come over to Linux where everything's free (libre and gratis). I am partway there. I have my old machine dual-booting Ubuntu and XP; being new to Windows 7, dual-booting that and Ubuntu is a challenge for another week:) In any case or the short-to-medium-term future, I will have a Windows 7 partition with files to be backed up and erased.

In fact the prospect of total migration to Linux (if it happens) brings the Windows backup & secure-delete problems even more to the fore and highlights the need to get something inexpensive or free, if I won't be using it for long.

Please advise.

If you want to erase the whole HDD prior to selling, DBAN is the way to go - it runs from a bootable CD. But if it's highly sensitive information, the only sure way is to drill 5 big holes right through the drive!

argus
12-02-2010, 11:19 AM
[QUOTE=linw;871463
If you google for secure erasers you will get heaps as well. [/QUOTE]

I know; but which ones can I trust? :)

Speedy Gonzales
12-02-2010, 11:26 AM
Use ccleaner then its free and trusted. And its just over 3 mb

Deimos
12-02-2010, 05:16 PM
Use diskpart to clean the old computers hard drive (will basically wipe the disk clean)
If it is the only hard drive in the system you will need to boot off the windows disk and in to the recovery console, or take the disk out and plug it in to another one, any version of Windows since 2000 can do it.
do this:
start, run, type diskpart (or in vista/7 go to start search and type the same) and press enter.
Type list disk and note the number of the disk you want to clean
type "select disk #" (# being the number of the disk) and hit enter
type "clean all" and hit enter

this will reset all sectors to zero, no data on the disk will be recoverable.

Note: despite what you may have seen on TV or Movies, it is impossible to determine the previous state of a bit once it has been changed, so there is no need to do multiple passes.

Deimos
12-02-2010, 05:25 PM
But if it's highly sensitive information, the only sure way is to drill 5 big holes right through the drive!

I think this is totally unnecessary, as I mentioned, if you re-write the sectors of a hard drive it is impossible to determine what was on it, only one pass is enough, there is no special technology that will do it, and if you have been told otherwise you were mislead.