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notechyet
16-01-2010, 05:38 AM
Hello to you all
I have a number of envelopes with photos and negatives.
Can someone tell me a good way to digitalise the negatives? Is there a service available anywhere for this? Is the only way for the photos to manualy scan them?
Any purpose build hardware(and not outragiously expensive) for either of them?
I have an "old" flatbed scanner, but......:crying long hours.....

thanks

PinoyKiw
16-01-2010, 07:46 AM
Several ways, depends on how many you have and how much you want to spend.

In no specific order.........

Try a professional photographic outlet or supplier, they might do scanning for you or refer you.

Get something like Nikon Coolscan.

You can get scanners with built in or add on slide/negative scanners.

You can attach a slide copier to the end of a camera len's.

Personally, I would have a talk to some of the professional photograph outlets in your area, maybe even the local one hour place might do or if you have enough to warrant cost and it will be a on going project, maybe the Nikon Coolscan.

Speedy Gonzales
16-01-2010, 07:48 AM
Well yeah thats the only way, scan the photos . What other ways can you think of?? Take the negatives to a photo shop. They did develop them, before digital cameras were invented. Unless youre planning on buying a scanner with an adapter than can scan negatives.

Jen
16-01-2010, 07:59 AM
What about this: Shoebox Scanning - Convert your photos to digital, painlessly (http://www.hanafins.co.nz/shoebox-scanning)? It has various branches around New Zealand.

gary67
16-01-2010, 08:07 AM
One way used quite well here is to project them onto the screen the have a camera mounted on a tripod and photograph them saves loads of time and the results can be reasonably good

pctek
16-01-2010, 08:24 AM
You can attach a slide copier to the end of a camera len's.

I would have a talk to some of the professional photograph outlets in your area,

My father uses the slide copier method and then converts them with Paintshop Pro Photo x2.

He said the photo labs charge too much considering how many he has.

PinoyKiw
16-01-2010, 08:36 AM
He said the photo labs charge too much considering how many he has.

You are right in that the professional labs will charge well for the service so it would pay to shop around, some might offer discount for bulk.

Or maybe try the Shoebox service mentioned in a earlier post, Hanafins, while not a top end photo and processing might be able to offer a more reasonable price.

notechyet
16-01-2010, 08:47 AM
What about this: Shoebox Scanning - Convert your photos to digital, painlessly (http://www.hanafins.co.nz/shoebox-scanning)? It has various branches around New Zealand.
Jen
That's sound very much like me.
If I can calculate right it is 9c per photo to CD/DVD

PinoyKiw
16-01-2010, 08:51 AM
Jen That's sound very much like me.
If I can calculate right it is 9c per photo to CD/DVD

I haven't looked at there website but if that is the price, that would be the way to go, maybe do just some for a start to check that the output is upto the standard you expect / require then go ahead and get everything done.

Trev
16-01-2010, 08:52 AM
Negative and Slide Digital Scanner $179-00 NZ.
http://www.innovations.co.nz/Product_Detail.aspx?ParentCategoryID=178&CategoryID=42&ProductID=61405
:)

notechyet
16-01-2010, 08:57 AM
Guys/Ladies
PF1, that's where you get the answers! :thanks

B.M.
16-01-2010, 12:02 PM
One way used quite well here is to project them onto the screen the have a camera mounted on a tripod and photograph them saves loads of time and the results can be reasonably good

I agree, having tried almost everything including 50cent per slide professional service, :eek: I found the best way was to project the slide onto the screen from close quarters and photograph the picture on screen.

Drawback was I needed to do it in darkness and I needed to make a small screen, as the old screen used for 35mm shots was too grainy. A piece of A4 paper would probably have done, but I just happened to have a piece of white plastic.

Frankly I was staggered by the results.

However, this was 35mm slides and black and white negatives is another kettle of fish. ;)

mikebartnz
16-01-2010, 11:30 PM
The local Jaycar stockists (Masterton) had a scanner for doing slides, negatives and photos.

Nomad
16-01-2010, 11:55 PM
Yep you can pay. You can also DIY. Nikon scanner is $$$ at $1,000 or more. They have been discontinued too by Nikon Corp. So they are what remains at the mo. There are lesser quality flatbed scanners - depends on your requirements. There is also the projector method and use a digital cam to take the pix - thou this won't work with brown neg film.

While you pay for a company to do it. To do a proper job DIY it does take some time. You scan it and you need to clean out the dust spots and hairs..... yes you may use ICE but that softens the image which is not that bad I guess... and then clean a few spots and improve the image via levels or curves .. and then resave the file. To do a proper job myself it may take me 15min for one image.

I am into my photography and even in this day, I intend to shoot medium and large format film. Some of you may say, what a odd ball :D I have 20 or 30 rolls of film in my freezer just for 35mm format.

What I tend to do with scanning film is that I use a catalog software, I scan all the film automatically - which scans each diff film and saves them each separately, I scan them 1024 size to save my time. I don't use ICE - save time, I don't clean spots - save time and they are only for preview. I don't adjust the colors. Auto is pretty good but require more work if you wanna archive them. As I just preview them I don't bother. In future if I like that and wanna work on it more, I take the film out again and rescan and take my time and do the full works. Properly post processing every 36 shots in each roll of film, is just too much work. Heck, I don't even edit all my digital shots (despite the lack of scanning required). I go on travel may shoot 300 on a week, I return and edit maybe 15 for 6x4 inches printed at kiosks or online and I print maybe a few at larger sizes. :p 90% of them gets unedited.

Nomad
17-01-2010, 12:02 AM
If you wanna a tradeoff. Maybe install the strips of film into the scanner. Auto scanner settings etc. Turn ice on that should get rid of most particles but it may have a tradeoff like .. a old stone building, it may think the window is stone color too when in fact it was a glass window. Things like that.

No real adjustments, no real rotate and stuff ...
Just keep that. I have a high end flatbed scanner, it should take a few minutes to scan each image at a proper res like 4000.
You load up the scanner, provided you have long strips 6 shots per strip I think, if you have mainly 24 shots for the roll (consumer film) one sitting may do one roll.
If you have 36 shots for the roll, that may require 1.5 sessions per roll.
Yeah .. after you click scan go away for a cuppa.

Careful thou. If you have a lot of dark shots like fireworks or dark shots inside churches etc... the scanner cannot recognise the frame of your shot. You may need to do it manual - that means draw a square around the film of what you think is the frame and hit scan each time ......

Morgenmuffel
18-01-2010, 11:52 AM
1) What the heck is ICE (Nomads posts)
2) Is there a scanner that does the other size film that was common in the cheapie hanimax? camera it looks to be a smaller size film, half my rellies used that style and the others used 35mm

Morgenmuffel
04-02-2010, 03:42 PM
Look people my brain is boiling I still don't know what ICE is and I think the other film size is 110? does that seem right

Zippity
04-02-2010, 03:51 PM
From Wiki: Digital ICE, "Image Correction and Enhancement", a technology automatically removes surface defects from a scanned image

Nomad
04-02-2010, 04:18 PM
@ Nigel.
What sort of budget you want to spend?
Basically if you don't have $2,000US forget about 120 formats - they are larger than 35mm film if you want a dedicated scanner. Not sure about 110 but see below.

You are probably looking at flatbed scanners.
Flatbed scanners are really just a plastic holder that goes on top of your scanners's glass. You can shoot anything from 35mm film to 8x10" (A4) sheet film.
If you have APS which is smaller than 35mm you can do that too but you have the joy of breaking the APS cassette up and striping the film out and cutting it. Other sizes - use your imagination.

ICE is a hardware feature on your scanner. You can choose to enable or disable it. It does work well ie., automatically remove hair and dust spots but you would still need to use a editing software to fully rid it. It does soften the image unfortunately. If you are picky, you may want to disable and spend more time in photoshop cleaning it up manually. You also need to be careful as sometimes and also depending on your setting it may do something wrong. For example if you are in Eastern Europe and you have a old style concrete clock tower, it might think the window is a dust spot so your window becomes a white concrete with dark frames around it :D

Nomad
04-02-2010, 04:30 PM
ICE uses infra red scanning to detect any hairs and marks on your film. I think it might even work if your child drew on your negs or if your negs has a rip on it.

Does not work with black and white film thou.