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View Full Version : Installing network jacks on walls.



Nomad
13-01-2010, 12:13 PM
Hi, I have lived in a place at uni where they had RJ45 jacks on the wall.

Let's say someone does the hardwork in wiring them. Let's also say you have 6 jacks around the house - lounge - kitchen - bedrooms etc ...

Are these connected to a hub?
If so you would need a hub that support 6 RJ45s?
Would it mean the hub preferably need to be in the centre of the house and it is a direct connection from each wall to the hub?
Would it also mean you cannot daisy chain it and hence you do require many metres of network cable?



Cheers.

nedkelly
13-01-2010, 12:20 PM
I wired up my house. Got 24 ports. Some for phone and other for network. Mine end in a patch panel then go into a switch and then into router. I recommend that you get a switch not a hub to cut down on network traffic and collisions. I am sure that there are 8 port switches out there somewhere.

Nomad
13-01-2010, 12:25 PM
If you have 4 bedrooms.
Is it B1 - Switch / Hub
B2 - Switch / Hub
B3 - Switch / Hub
B4 - Switch / Hub

Could you do B1 - B2 - B3 - B4 - Switch or Hub
Or the likes B1 - B2 - Switch or Hub and a similar thing with the other 2?

nedkelly
13-01-2010, 12:28 PM
best to go with first option. Never done two jacks on one line but remember someone telling me that it might cause collisions. Mine just go jack to switch. (well the active ones)

wainuitech
13-01-2010, 12:43 PM
Easy -- You have the router in one location, at the router you have 4 cables, these can go 1 to each room + a switch on 1 to expand that to another 4 (this is using a 5 port Switch , 1 port is the "in" )

So from that setup you will end up with 9 connections.

You can simply add in more switches to each port of the router, even from another switch, and you can keep going by daisy chaining till you get to 254 Connections. (most routers have 1-254)

My router has 4 ports, off each port is at least 1 switch, some have 2, 3 or more switches per port. This VERY ROUGH sketch (http://www.imagef1.net.nz/files/Switches.jpg) should give you a good idea.

nedkelly
13-01-2010, 12:49 PM
ha my network diagram is a mess compared to your one wainuitech

CYaBro
13-01-2010, 12:55 PM
Each network socket that you want, wherever in the house, needs a cable from it directly to the switch/hub.
This switch/hub can be anywhere as the cable lengths can be up to 90 metres, which would be pretty unlikely in a standard sized house.
So if you want 6 network jackpoints then you will need an 8 port switch as there are no 6 port switches.
You would want extra ports on the switch anyway as you will most likely need to connect a router so that all computers can access the internet.
As Wainuitech said, if you have one jackpoint and you need to plug in more than one device/computer then you can connect a 5 port switch which will give you 4 spare ports.

If you are rewiring then I would put at least two jackpoints in each room.

wratterus
13-01-2010, 01:21 PM
x2 Wainui and Cya. I just wired a house this morning with RJ45, two cables to each room, all going to a 24 port gigabit switch in a cupboard downstairs with the ADSL Router. Will be back next week to finish off wiring the jacks once the jib has been put on.

wainuitech
13-01-2010, 01:36 PM
LUXURY wratterus , open walls -- the fun is when you have to crawl under houses through all the crap dragging a box of cable behind :lol:

OR like one I have to do later today - in a office with concrete walls -- Oh joy.

nedkelly
13-01-2010, 01:51 PM
I did mine as the house was being built. Now I face a new problem how am I to change cables to CAT6 in the future?

wratterus
13-01-2010, 01:52 PM
LUXURY wratterus , open walls -- the fun is when you have to crawl under houses through all the crap dragging a box of cable behind :lol:

OR like one I have to do later today - in a office with concrete walls -- Oh joy.

I know, I was lucky! Nothing worse than re-wiring old buildings. Good luck this arvo :badpc:

pctek
13-01-2010, 04:52 PM
Hi, I have lived in a place at uni where they had RJ45 jacks on the wall.

Let's say someone does the hardwork in wiring them.


Yep - that was me. I installed half of Akld Unis network cables and stuff.



Are these connected to a hub?




Yes. And floor switches. And a building switch. And so on.......

gary67
13-01-2010, 05:47 PM
Have been doing mine as we decorate each room since I can run all cables in the garage. To change to cat 6 just use the old cables as draw wires

CYaBro
13-01-2010, 06:01 PM
CAT6 is not really necessary as CAT5e can do gigabit speeds if you have terminated correctly.

Nomad
15-01-2010, 02:23 PM
How much do people charge to do the wiring to an existing house? Let's say just the lounge, dining room and 3 bedrooms. Rough price.

Folks are not computer literate so maybe we can do just with 2 rooms wired, easier enough to do myself. Upstairs and directly downstairs with the router placed in the conservatory which happens to be in a split floor between the two.

Hey, what happens if for argument sake, it is a small flat, with a flat roof where there is no attic. How do you wire the cables within the walls?


Cheers

Nomad
15-01-2010, 02:40 PM
Ps, renovating kitchen so thought it would be a good time do to the network wiring too. :D If so can disable the wireless on my crap Linksys and be done with it. They want to convert the stove top to gas (burner) and put a proper rangehood above the oven to punch a hole in roof or wall to expel it out. Redo some of the old kitchen cabinets too, had it since we got the home and that is like 60yrs old. New kitchen sink and one that does not block with the old insinkerator.

wainuitech
15-01-2010, 03:31 PM
How much do people charge to do the wiring to an existing house? Let's say just the lounge, dining room and 3 bedrooms. Rough price.

Folks are not computer literate so maybe we can do just with 2 rooms wired, easier enough to do myself. Upstairs and directly downstairs with the router placed in the conservatory which happens to be in a split floor between the two.

Hey, what happens if for argument sake, it is a small flat, with a flat roof where there is no attic. How do you wire the cables within the walls?


Cheers
Personally when I wire up a place, its my normal hourly rate for labor, which is $80 +gst. ( + materials) Some places you feel like charging more as the crap (literately) you have to crawl through on your guts or shuffle along dragging a box of cable.

I say crawl, as a normal house its sometimes easier to run cables under the floor, and clip along the floor joists (if there's enough room to get under there) that way the exit jacks can be placed at floor level, instead of having to drill down through walls, studs etc.

I'm not exactly a big person and some of the places I have had to go :eek: ground either wet, or puddles under the house, cats and dogs been under there :groan: One place had about 100 mm deep of water all under the house - I refused to do it.

One place the lady told me there was plenty of room under the house (cool) get there, and WTF About 300mm from the ground to the bottom of the floor joists, and a hole in the side of the building, about the same square -- You got to be kidding !!! We went wireless :rolleyes:

If its a concrete wall, OR you cant get inside the walls, I normally run a plastic duct about 15mm Sq that will take 3 cables.

Something like This ducting (http://www.imagef1.net.nz/files/trunking_family.jpg) if done correctly (tidy) and in the right places, you hardly notice it.

Nomad
15-01-2010, 04:05 PM
If one is going from the top to down ... inside the walls, how does one drill holes in those frames? Say bedroom 1 is directly above bedroom 2, hey put a cable directly in the walls doing down.

Nomad
15-01-2010, 04:10 PM
Ducting, I am guessing one still need to go through walls, cos how you get thru a door way with closed doors.

wainuitech
15-01-2010, 04:15 PM
Question 18 ---- Very long drill bit (serious) I have speed bits , 10mm, 12 that are 406mm in length and hole saw set (for floors / Multi Cables, eg:several cables to one exit point). I try to avoid going down inside walls, as its drilling blind and god knows what you may hit, once you get to the end of the drill length, you add on an attachments to extend it.

Imagine an oil drilling rig , they add on more lengths of pipe as they go down.

If you have to come down a wall from the roof, you can still do ducting, it butts against the roof, small hole to allow cable through and if possible put it "out of the way". If its a painted wall its even better, paint the duct the same color, and its almost invisible..

Thats why I prefer under the floor, no doors generally :p .

Nomad
15-01-2010, 04:41 PM
One last question.
About that long drill. I take it is not a right angle driller? That means you need to rip a big hole in the wall right? So you can fit the driller inside the walls to drill down.

I can always put the jackpoint on top of the wall - don't look pretty thou, if 2 bedroom design. Floor level on one and ceiling level on the other :p

CYaBro
15-01-2010, 04:44 PM
One last question.
About that long drill. I take it is not a right angle driller? That means you need to rip a big hole in the wall right? So you can fit the driller inside the walls to drill down.



Haha. No.
You need to get in the roof and drill down through the top plate of the wall.
It's a real bugger if you lose a bit inside the wall! Done that a couple of times :crying
Always fun trying to fish it out. :help:

Nomad
15-01-2010, 04:46 PM
Haha. No.
You need to get in the roof and drill down through the top plate of the wall.
It's a real bugger if you lose a bit inside the wall! Done that a couple of times :crying
Always fun trying to fish it out. :help:

That won't work then. Just above the top bedroom is the window frame :dogeye:
Well I could use a side wall.

Drill from the top? I need a 6m drill bit then. There is no gap between the floors.

Maybe cheaper and easier to rip the gib out :D

Nomad
15-01-2010, 04:53 PM
Oh I could go under a wardrobe, that works then ....

nedkelly
15-01-2010, 05:13 PM
CYaBro what do you mean by terminated properly?

wainuitech
15-01-2010, 05:14 PM
Yep go what ever way is easiest, dont really want to go knocking holes in walls - just means more work.

There has been many time I Have run the ducting along the floor/wall joint, tuck it in tight held on with industrial double sided tape, similar to whats holds trim on some cars.

OR as long as the carpet is not stapled down at the edges, but is held by that carpet spikes, it gives you about 25 -30 mm to lift the edge of the carpet, slip it under, then push down the carpet again -- Bingo, hidden cables with only the jack showing at floor level Like These (http://www.hyperline.com/catalog/plugs/rj45-s.shtml)

Really depends also if you want to hide the cables, job I did yesterday -- concrete walls, the guys look ed strange when I asked where i could run ducting :illogical Just drop in the rest that run along the floor --- OK easy then.


It's a real bugger if you lose a bit inside the wall! Done that a couple of times OH YEAH -- its :angry followed by -- OH #@%(*&% Only lost one so far.

wainuitech
15-01-2010, 05:21 PM
CYaBro what do you mean by terminated properly? Prob means wired in the standard sequence - some just dont wire them correctly and its a damn mess, with non connections. either Correct wiring (http://www.google.co.nz/imgres?imgurl=http://simple.be/tech/reference/images/net/RJ-45000.png&imgrefurl=http://simple.be/tech/reference/ethernet&h=202&w=489&sz=4&tbnid=halmOscHPbUYIM:&tbnh=54&tbnw=130&prev=/images%3Fq%3Drj45%2Bwiring%2Bdiagram&hl=en&usg=__eUjy9pUnKCRzGAi__es5CwlJtQM=&ei=De1PS8rkK4_SsQPuxbT9Bw&sa=X&oi=image_result&resnum=2&ct=image&ved=0CAkQ9QEwAQ) I usually use 568B

CYaBro
15-01-2010, 05:38 PM
Prob means wired in the standard sequence - some just dont wire them correctly and its a damn mess, with non connections. either Correct wiring (http://www.google.co.nz/imgres?imgurl=http://simple.be/tech/reference/images/net/RJ-45000.png&imgrefurl=http://simple.be/tech/reference/ethernet&h=202&w=489&sz=4&tbnid=halmOscHPbUYIM:&tbnh=54&tbnw=130&prev=/images%3Fq%3Drj45%2Bwiring%2Bdiagram&hl=en&usg=__eUjy9pUnKCRzGAi__es5CwlJtQM=&ei=De1PS8rkK4_SsQPuxbT9Bw&sa=X&oi=image_result&resnum=2&ct=image&ved=0CAkQ9QEwAQ) I usually use 568B

Yea, just meant that all 8 wires are terminated at both ends as gigabit LAN uses all of them not just 4 like 10/100 does.

nedkelly
15-01-2010, 06:00 PM
well if that is the case then I am good because I think mine are done like that as well. Pin 1 to 1, 2 to 2, etc

nedkelly
15-01-2010, 06:00 PM
oh yeah all 8 wires are used

wainuitech
15-01-2010, 08:31 PM
oh yeah all 8 wires are used :clap :thumbs:

One thing that makes networking "interesting" is having to go behind someone else to fix their balls up, or try and figure out what the hell they have done.

Had to on several occasions, pull some more wire out ( as long as they left some slack) cut the plugs/wall sockets off and rewire them to standard.

Agent_24
15-01-2010, 10:15 PM
Yep - that was me. I installed half of Akld Unis network cables and stuff.

That must have been fun :waughh:

Nomad
19-01-2010, 09:17 AM
I am guessing that we may need to drill a path outside to lay another gas pipe. The gas meter is at the other side to the now to renovate kitchen.

Is it ok to lay a computer network cable along the gas pipe? :confused:
The only sensible way to get Cat6 to the bottom floor other than pulling walls out or drilling between walls for a whole floor height.

If it wasn't for gas, maybe wireless is the only sensible way for us.

wainuitech
19-01-2010, 12:17 PM
Never laid cable on a gas pipe, but it should be ok. Just check with the gas installer.

What I have done at a customers site once when they were laying power (and my own place) is lay some 20mm orange electrical conduit in the trench while its open, (about 30 Mtrs) then put through 4 runs of cable - At the customers site two were being used, 1 for the internet, and the other for the phone lines - with two spares or could be used as a pull wire if needed.

If you go the electrical conduit way - thread through at least 1 extra run of cable, as you never know when it could be wanted and its easier to do with a trench open that after-wards, cables cheap.

Nomad
20-01-2010, 04:14 PM
Dang. Back to wireless. There is a pipe in the garage that is larger we can be branched off into the kitchen. That means no avenue to get a network cable to the bottom floor (ensuite bedroom). Maybe I am picky enough to install network cables to the top floor anyway. Dining room get it but no lounge again drilling a whole floor down from the attic.

The bottom floor was added in by the previous owner(s), it used to be a single floor house only with the garage on the bottom and the front door then immediately the staircase up to the main room, there is a bottom trap door that you can access but due to the new rooms which were added that kinda introduces a new brick wall.

The only way is really dig the concrete floor just for a cat6 cable, or use a wardrobe upstairs and drill a hole via the wall and put the cable outside the house going to the bedroom downstairs. Or put the network jackpoint on the ceiling :p well some offices do that.