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Greg
09-12-2009, 11:53 AM
Some folks' comments just want to make you throttle them ( or else vomit)

Here's a short list.

Please add to it with your reasons...

WMG (goes without saying)
Terry - his music links always promise something great, but fail to deliver
Bob Doe - because I envy his l33t Chinese cooking skillz.
Terry Porrit - GIVE UP ON THOSE DAMN OLDY MUSIC LINKS!
Gary something or the other. He who hates garlic hates life.
Me - sickening right all the time
Did I mention Terry?
Metla - he rides a motorbike better than I can walk

More?


I shoulda made this a poll, but ther're too many names to mention.

xyz823
09-12-2009, 11:57 AM
Theres ALOT more.

Theres that bloody Greg for starters.

wainuitech
09-12-2009, 12:13 PM
Theres ALOT more.

Theres that bloody Greg for starters.^^^^^^ :lol: Be nice

roddy_boy
09-12-2009, 12:18 PM
Is this this year's version of the Press F1 member of the year awards?

prefect
09-12-2009, 12:21 PM
I vote roddy as Press F1 member of the year for his services to humour albeit twisted humor.
Dont laugh they gave Hussien Obama a peace prize for helping the Palestinians get their land back.

bob_doe_nz
09-12-2009, 01:25 PM
R2x1: Can't get a bloody straight answer out of him :rolleyes:

Richard
09-12-2009, 01:38 PM
I like Terry's music. :p

R2x1
09-12-2009, 01:47 PM
I like Terry's choice of music :)

Cicero
09-12-2009, 02:18 PM
I like Terry's music. :p

I would like to see a vote on that,I suggest you would be lonely.

Greg
09-12-2009, 03:00 PM
Theres ALOT more.

Theres that bloody Greg for starters.Already mentioned. (aka me)

prefect
09-12-2009, 03:14 PM
I like Terry's music. :p
Terrys Hits of the Boer war.
No his taste in music is at the opposite end of the spectrum to mine I love Abba and Bonnie Tyler, ONJ to name a few.

Terry Porritt
09-12-2009, 04:57 PM
Some folks' comments just want to make you throttle them ( or else vomit)

Here's a short list.

Please add to it with your reasons...

WMG (goes without saying)
Terry - his music links always promise something great, but fail to deliver.
Bob Doe - because I envy his l33t Chinese cooking skillz.
Terry Porrit - GIVE UP ON THOSE DAMN OLDY MUSIC LINKS!
Gary something or the other. He who hates garlic hates life.
Me - sickening right all the time
Did I mention Terry?
Metla - he rides a motorbike better than I can walk

More?


I shoulda made this a poll, but ther're too many names to mention.

Wake up grumpy this morning, then ?
Reckon you haven't been getting your oats lately :lol:

By your own words, you admit to clicking 'ON THOSE DAMN OLDY MUSIC LINKS', that fail to deliver, else how would you know?

So we can only assume you cant refrain from the impulsive clicking ? Or, itchy forefinger syndrome....

Ok this one is not music but is appropriate: Mona Lot clip (http://www.box.net/shared/fa1m1le9g8).....guess the programme...

This is music, That's What I like about You (http://www.box.net/shared/oi18rrq4gq), 7.7MB mp3, you don't have to click it. :clap:badpc:
Jack Teagarden 1931.

PS, thanks Richard, you will not be forgotten in my will, I have been wondering who to pass on my Bix Beiderbecke collection to.
Cicero has forfeited his chance...........

Richard
09-12-2009, 05:28 PM
Gee thanks Terry. Just how old are you by the way. :thumbs::thanks

Cicero
09-12-2009, 05:49 PM
Gee thanks Terry. Just how old are you by the way. :thumbs::thanks

About 72.

Terry Porritt
09-12-2009, 05:57 PM
About 72.

Not a bad guess, Cic, by the law of averages, and the average age at death of all my male forebears going way back, including my Dad and Granddad, have about another 2 years...........then my music collection will be up for grabs, together with my filing cabinet of paper work going back to Lucas ...and school exercise books that show when I was a lad, we were streaks ahead in maths and science compared to what they teach now :), old motorbike mags, and Vincent memorabilia.....it will have to all go...

Paul.Cov
09-12-2009, 06:25 PM
No two people will have the same taste in music, but it never hurts to share your preferences. It does however risk hurt to criticise those preferences, even if done kinda tongue-in-cheek.

I've got a good mate who went from playing classical violin stuff, to playing the bloody banjo! They might seem poles apart, but at least he's having fun, but to me, just the mention of banjo makes me cough on my beer.

But who am I to criticise. The only thing I can play is a cassette!

Cicero
09-12-2009, 07:25 PM
Not a bad guess, Cic, by the law of averages, and the average age at death of all my male forebears going way back, including my Dad and Granddad, have about another 2 years...........then my music collection will be up for grabs, together with my filing cabinet of paper work going back to Lucas ...and school exercise books that show when I was a lad, we were streaks ahead in maths and science compared to what they teach now :), old motorbike mags, and Vincent memorabilia.....it will have to all go...

Have you taken modern medicine into account,you might get 3 years!
:o
Might pay for you to start getting rid of your stuff,save others having to say,dad collected some rubbish.

SurferJoe46
09-12-2009, 08:24 PM
and Vincent memorabilia.....it will have to all go...

Can we talk here? I mean - if you are that close to going room temperature, can we firm up the Vincent stuff?

Is there a Black Shadow or a Rapide in my future?

Terry Porritt
09-12-2009, 09:00 PM
Can we talk here? I mean - if you are that close to going room temperature, can we firm up the Vincent stuff?

Is there a Black Shadow or a Rapide in my future?

Ah, if only, but the two bikes I had are long gone, they would be worth 4 or 5 figures the pair these days.

The Shadow was extensively modded, and had Black Lightning MkII cams.

The only Vincent I have now is a "Matchbox" plastic kit model,
http://www.imagef1.net.nz/files/Vincent_Black_Shadow_.jpg

The other memorabilia are books, factory manual, Phil Vincents manual, and a very few bits.

Greg
10-12-2009, 09:43 AM
The only Vincent I have now is a "Matchbox" plastic kit model,
http://www.imagef1.net.nz/files/Vincent_Black_Shadow_.jpg
Jeez that's a nice looking machine. Imagine what Burt Munroe would've achieved with a real one!

convair
10-12-2009, 09:47 AM
Ah, if only, but the two bikes I had are long gone, they would be worth 4 or 5 figures the pair these days.

The Shadow was extensively modded, and had Black Lightning MkII cams.

The only Vincent I have now is a "Matchbox" plastic kit model,
http://www.imagef1.net.nz/files/Vincent_Black_Shadow_.jpg

The other memorabilia are books, factory manual, Phil Vincents manual, and a very few bits.

Nice looking model. Looks like it was a rocket in its day.

FoxyMX
10-12-2009, 12:27 PM
R2x1: Can't get a bloody straight answer out of him :rolleyes:

R2x1 is not the worst thing, he's the best thing. :thumbs:

Though he owes me a few boxes of monitor wipes now. :lol: :lol:

Renmoo
10-12-2009, 12:37 PM
R2x1 is not the worst thing, he's the best thing. :thumbs:

Though he owes me a few boxes of monitor wipes now. :lol: :lol:
R2x1: Always takes me double the time to understand his statements compared to others :p

Terry Porritt
10-12-2009, 12:59 PM
Nice looking model. Looks like it was a rocket in its day.

It was advertised as the world's fastest standard motorcycle, as it certainly was in its day.
The 1948 'Motor Cycle' magazine road test gave 122 mph (196kmh), that was on 72 octane wartime type "Pool" petrol and lowish compression ratio of 7.3:1. One model in France was clocked at 128mph.

Later on with modifications, higher compresion and higher octanes, genuine 125 - 135 mph could be achieved with 'ordinary' road bikes.

The design was ahead of its time, and had some good and novel features, but there were some flaws, notably bearing material combinations, and silly things like putting oil feed holes on the loaded side of a bearing instead of the unloaded side.
The valve gear design allowed very high revs without valve bounce, but there was a general flimsiness about the camshaft and cam follower spindles, and it was noisy.

The oil pump was inadequate, but a 'double throw' unit off the Vincent Picador target drone motor could be fitted.

The crankcase design was less than satisfactory, with too many things shrink fitted, so that if the case was heated say to remove a bearing, the spindles were likely to drop out too.

They got away with some of this in the early days after the war because the Vincent works was still using up their wartime stock of high quality aircraft grade steels and alloys.

Later on wear rates were unacceptable without replacing materials and modifying designs.

They went through a bad patch (after production ceased, but still producing spares) with cams not properly hardend, and the valve gear wearing very rapidly.

Leaded bronze bearing materials and hard chrome was the answer to many wear problems.

My Shadow was some 30lbs lighter than a standard model, lots of mods, Velocette caged roller big ends ,(thank you Lucas for access to all the machine tools, aircraft quality stainless and Dural, plating and shot peening etc etc....:) ) It could do some 130mph + sitting up behind an Avon fairing.

SurferJoe46
10-12-2009, 12:59 PM
I had a Norton Commando, 850 for a year or so when the guy who owned it got whacked in VietNam. He was a helicopter door-gunner and took a 7.62mm round up his personal tailpipe destroying all his lower spine and his both kidneys on a flying sortie out of Long Binh. He died almost three days later in a morphine coma on the US Hospital Ship, Repose off the shore of Da Nang. I watched him die.

His dad later on when I got back from my own Seavay tour (COM/CRU/DES/FLOT) gave it to me and also all the cars he had in his garage. That's where I got the 1958 Corvette and a 1965 Packard Patrician and a 1936 Cord. It was quite a haul - but his dad wanted shed of the cars that reminded him of his son - so I just drove them a block to my home in Costa Mesa where my first wife and I lived.

Enyway - the Norton - although fast, was not reliable. It wasn't just the electrics either. It spit shims when you got into the power band and then the engine would shut off or try to run on one cylinder. I got rid of the pot-metal junk-o carbs from the UK (Amal? Solex? I don't remember - but I literally tossed them over the back fence and never saw them again) and I put twin Mikunis on it and the mileage went 'way up and so did the performance.

I got rid of the Norton - it was a sucker trade as I got two Honda 350 Big Bear Scramblers out of the deal - and although they lacked Brit Class, they at least ran all the time and never skipped a beat.

Other Brit bikes I owned:


1) BSA Victor 440 single - a gawd-nasty thumper that moved dirt by the buckets full with the rear tire.
2) Triumph Trident Triple - Hated it!
3) BSA Gold Star 500cc. OK but NO POWER. Didn't like the close 3-to-4 ratio.

Terry Porritt
10-12-2009, 01:14 PM
Yes ..zinc die cast Amals, not the best, but that was all we had.
Amal GPs were ok.

Synchronising the carbs was an art perfected by Vincent owners

The hydraulic dampers made by Vincent were useless, but then hydraulic shocks and suspension was in its infancy, most bikes were still rigid frame.

Many people fitted Woodhead Monroe units on the front and Konis at the rear.

convair
10-12-2009, 01:26 PM
Thanks for the information Terry. Sounds like it was a fun bike to ride.

prefect
10-12-2009, 01:27 PM
The only shims a Norton Commando had were the shims for the isolatic suspension of the engine and gearbox the only way for them to spit would be for the bike to be broken apart.
The valve operation was NATO for the time lower cam shaft push rods and rocker shaft rocker shaft cover thats the 4 bug things on the head that still used BSF/BSW spanners.
I had a Z900 kwacker which spat out a shim but it was my fault for not having a fat enough one it.
Yes all Lucas electrics including the ****** contact breakers which broke off.
Continuing home on 1 cylinder of 325cc was a pain.
****** Amals always leaked

SurferJoe46
10-12-2009, 01:41 PM
The valve operation was NATO for the time lower cam shaft push rods and rocker shaft rocker shaft cover thats the 2 bug things on the head that still used BSF/BSW spanners.

Yeah thanks.

When I posted and re-read that it didn't feel right. I could toss the exhaust pushrod on the 440 Victor all the time - I think it had to do with the compression release - but I remember the Norton coming home on one jug a few times and I guess I forgot it too was a pushrod that jumped out of the rocker in the head..

That Wentworth wrench rode in my back pocket for just that very reason too! I could rock the bike in gear and move the pushrod to it's lowest position and brute force the pushrod back into place and I (and it) was/were good to go for a short while again.

I also remember the Zener Diode in the BSA. Gack! What were they thinking?

prefect
10-12-2009, 01:43 PM
Commando had LUCAS zener diode on the aluminuim bracket which held the foot rest I suppose as a heat sink.

FoxyMX
10-12-2009, 04:51 PM
R2x1: Always takes me double the time to understand his statements compared to others :p

Yes, I have to admit that I have to read his posts twice to get the meaning sometimes. :blush: :p

(Just to get the thread back on topic and bust up the boring talk about engines. :p)

SurferJoe46
10-12-2009, 05:03 PM
Yes, I have to admit that I have to read his posts twice to get the meaning sometimes. :blush: :p

(Just to get the thread back on topic and bust up the boring talk about engines. :p)

Boring? Moi?

Terry Porritt
10-12-2009, 05:31 PM
Commando had LUCAS zener diode on the aluminuim bracket which held the foot rest I suppose as a heat sink.

That's right, Lucas had a semiconductor division, their diodes and zener diodes were quite good.
I made an experimental crystal slicer when with Group Research using hydrostatic water bearings to support a very thin diamond cutting disc that cut on the outer periphery, thus reducing waste, ie more crystal slices out of a given length of silicon rod. Most cutting wheels at that time were radially tensioned and the diamond coating was around the periphery of a central hole.


Wentworth? That is not British...Joseph Whitworth ..please

pcuser42
10-12-2009, 05:38 PM
R2x1: Always takes me double the time to understand his statements compared to others :p

Agreed. :p

Cicero
10-12-2009, 05:48 PM
That is not British...Joseph Whit worth ..please

The first man to standardise threads I believe.

R2x1
10-12-2009, 05:49 PM
That's right, Lucas had a semiconductor division, their diodes and zener diodes were quite good.
I made an experimental crystal slicer when with Group Research using hydrostatic water bearings to support a very thin diamond cutting disc that cut on the outer periphery, thus reducing waste, ie more crystal slices out of a given length of silicon rod. Most cutting wheels at that time were radially tensioned and the diamond coating was around the periphery of a central hole.

That is not British...Joseph Whitworth ..please
Diodes that were good compared to ? ? Elf droppings?

Hydrostatic bearings? Why not? Static was something Lucas were good at. They were better than any other manufacturer before or since at keeping electrons stationary.
Only at Lucas (Lights U Could Almost See) could stationary water be used in bearings - all those other poor fools thought bearings implied the possibility of movement ;)

Whitworth had some good ideas. His thread is still the finest ever made for cast iron bolts.

roddy_boy
10-12-2009, 09:33 PM
Boring? Moi?

Very much so.

GameJunkie
10-12-2009, 09:50 PM
Very much so.

always doom and gloom...

R2x1
10-12-2009, 10:15 PM
. . . but precisely punctuated.

SurferJoe46
11-12-2009, 05:59 AM
Whitworth had some good ideas. His thread is still the finest ever made for cast iron bolts.

We always just giggled at the feeble attempt by the Brits to manufacture anything out of metal. Threads by Whitworth/Wentworth aside - the materials into which they were cut was not better than congealed Londonderry Fog as the threads failed and fell off the base of whatever they were cut into.

Britain should have stayed with iron men and wooden ships and stuck with wood for their internal combustion modes of transportation.

The manufacturing of steel and steel alloys is rumored to be a cottage industry in Britain that stay at home mums had going in a pit in their back yard, tossing coal and coke into a hole with rocks containing iron alloy and skimming off they slurry and calling that "Fine English Sheffield Steel". Gack!

It was not uncommon - nay, it was a GIVEN that any time you took a bolt out of a Limey import, to see the threads came out WITH the bolts and would require a Heli-Col to make the unit serviceable again unless the bolts themselves just twisted off like warm putty.

Ever take a head off an E-Jaguar straight six? The head material is called "aluminimum" - since it was a minimally poor substitute for real bauxite-based alloys - and it always reformed itself around the block studs and you have to carve the bolts periphery free just to remove the head. What junk.

Let's not EVEN talk about the quality of Rootes-Group transmission steel alloys either and the fact that there were no real blueprints and specs for bearings, shafts and gears. They were all 'one-off' designs, and the dimensions changed at will according to the mood and abilities of the machinist who made the parts at home after dinner.

There are no such things as common dimensions on most Lime-parts, and I bet it's because they cannot understand each other with their accents. If I had - say, a four speed from a TR to rebuild - it was better to fire up the lathe and make the parts I needed, since I at least, had the old part and could copy it for dimensions and length, etc. :lol:

But that's OK since the Germans cannot make anything out of plastic that doesn't ooze, crack or crumble.

The Japanese, however can make steel better than anybody - they should since they have all the Bessemer Converters from the US since the end of WW-2 and all the chopped up Plymouths, Cadillacs and DeSotos from junkyards for pre-purified raw materials from the US too.

Japan was the precursor to the Asian Tigers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Asian_Tigers) that the US built - and now regrets - since it took the US from THE industrial giant to the same value as a service and cottage industry that the UK had been since their discovery of fire, the round wheel and coke for heating and cooking and fermentation of Meade.

It's a good thing that youse guys shook off the British mammary and struck off on your own - moving far away to another galaxy.

prefect
11-12-2009, 07:25 AM
Whitworth thread almost indentical to ANC thread except for 1/2" so the yanks must have copied it from the pommies.
Jags were a pain in the ass to work on my mate had a mid sixties jag something with a mark was a major mish just to change the spark plugs.

Cicero
11-12-2009, 08:30 AM
Spitfire from England wasn't so bad,made of metal too!

SurferJoe46
11-12-2009, 09:18 AM
They were a fine aircraft - but unfortunately too far advanced for the alloys and building processes available to the Brit airframe builders of the time.

Actually it had some sever alloy problems.

The Spitfire Supermarine H.F Mk.VII. had a problem with aileron reversal when the "d-shaped" leading edge-to-mean cord would twist and create the seemingly reversal of the aileron effect.

The faults was in the hysteresis and low modulus of the poor aluminum and bad alloys in the skin, which had been originally fabric/dope in the first prototypes, and later covered with flawed flush pop-rivets and gaseous aluminum skin. It wasn't strong enough.

This also showed up in a copycat design and attending project plans sent by the British design teams for "suggestions" in the design and construction of the B-47 - but this problem only surfaced at low altitudes with thicker air and unnatural demands by the pilots in wartime theaters of operation.

What happened was that at the high speeds that the Supermarine Spitfire could be dived at, this problem of aileron reversal became apparent when it was wished to increase the lateral maneuverability (rate of roll) by increasing the aileron area to make them competitive with the biplane turn and roll rates that the Army desired and demanded. .

The Brit designers knew that reversal was going to happen since the d-tube as designed and built- and for the thin resultant cross section - would deflect with the loss of torsional stability.

The aircraft had a wing infidelity problem originally designed to happen at an airspeed of 580 mph, and subsequent attempts to increase the aileron area resulted in the wing twisting when the ailerons were applied at high speed, the aircraft then rolling in the opposite direction to that intended by the pilot.

The biggest problem was the original design and wrong purpose for the aircraft - as it was deigned as a pursuit attack craft to go rapidly to pursue high altitude bombers, and very little consideration was made for any high speed maneuvers when so engaged. That was just plain/plane bad planning, bulldogedly blind insight and stiff upper lipped short sightedness.

The problem of increasing the newly-defined and necessary rate of roll was temporarily alleviated with the introduction of "clipped" wing tips to reduce the aerodynamic load on the tip area, allowing larger ailerons to be used until a new, stiffer wing could be incorporated.This new wing was introduced in the Mark XXI and had a theoretical aileron reversal speed of 825 mph (1,328 km/h).

Sadly - the originating problem was poor alloys, construction and design techniques and use of skin fasteners that also failed from poor alloys and irresponsibly bad quality control.

prefect
11-12-2009, 09:26 AM
Always thought the Spitfire saved the world didnt know it had control problems.

R2x1
11-12-2009, 09:38 AM
Spitfire was highly regarded by the press gallery, but one of the most unserviceable aircraft even the British could cobble together, although if they could have jammed a Bristol radial in there it could have been almost 100% out of service.

convair
11-12-2009, 09:39 AM
I nominate myself as being a bit difficult. I don't put all of the information in some of my posts that require assistance

prefect
11-12-2009, 09:46 AM
Funny everyone is destroying my long held love for spitfires. Didnt Galland say he wanted spitfeurs ?WTF is wrong with Bristol radials the sleeve valve ones were reliable and had an incredible power to weight ratio. Safe was using them up to the eighties. Beaufighters were the one ww2 plane the pomes used up to late fifities albeit target towing so the engines must have been good.
The only bad thing I heard about spitfires was the complexity of the curved wings took a while to make.

R2x1
11-12-2009, 09:52 AM
SAFE could afford to use Bristols as long as they were heavily subsidised. Do you know of any unsubsidised user that lasted longer than a few weeks?

Cicero
11-12-2009, 10:12 AM
SAFE could afford to use Bristols as long as they were heavily subsidised. Do you know of any unsubsidised user that lasted longer than a few weeks?

We are talking engines,not subsidies.

wratterus
11-12-2009, 10:22 AM
I nominate myself as being a bit difficult. I don't put all of the information in some of my posts that require assistance

Ah, but you are honest about it! :D

Marnie
11-12-2009, 10:23 AM
We are talking engines,not subsidies.

Actually I thought we were talking about The world's worst thing about PressF1 Chat persona... ;)

Cicero
11-12-2009, 10:32 AM
Actually I thought we were talking about The world's worst thing about PressF1 Chat persona... ;)

No,that is natural progression,when I do it;)

SurferJoe46
11-12-2009, 10:34 AM
My difficult-ness goes unannounced but obvious.

convair
11-12-2009, 10:56 AM
Ah, but you are honest about it! :D

Well its true. Sometimes I forget to add the required information and end up posting it later in the thread.