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xyz823
20-11-2009, 08:59 AM
http://www.maximumpc.com/article/features/8_things_you_need_know_about_chrome_os

http://www.maximumpc.com/article/news/google_explains_chrome_os_3_minute_video

It really is an OS built into the cloud.

xyz823
20-11-2009, 09:12 AM
I would like to try it out but...


Chrome will have very specific platform requirements. It won’t run on machines with physical hard drives, only SSDs. Only certain Wi-Fi chipsets will be supported. Chrome OS will also have requirements for screen size, a full-sized keyboard, and a decent sized touchpad. They demoed Chrome OS working on an eeePC today, and said that you'd be able to upgrade some netbooks on the market today using a screwdriver.

Chilling_Silence
20-11-2009, 10:06 AM
Keen as mustard .. bummer that I sold my EeePC's!

Seriously though I know it's going to have a very limited application, but damn it's appealing, and they *truly* have foresight to be planning everything "from the cloud" like that. Sure people may get sketchy about their data not physically being right there on their machine, you can't always teach an old dog new tricks, but regardless, they're pioneering something cool in my books!

Chilling_Silence
20-11-2009, 10:39 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A9WVmNfgjtQ

Good stuff :)

Nice to see they're taking security well. I could envisage this being a corporates dream! You've got 1,000 employees on the road with "dumb" devices, it doesn't matter if they're lost or stolen as the data isn't stored on the device itself, and what limited data *is* installed on it is password-protected and then encrypted on the SSD. That's a freaking dream for IT managers!!

pcuser42
20-11-2009, 10:56 AM
Chrome will have very specific platform requirements. It won’t run on machines with physical hard drives, only SSDs. Only certain Wi-Fi chipsets will be supported. Chrome OS will also have requirements for screen size, a full-sized keyboard, and a decent sized touchpad. They demoed Chrome OS working on an eeePC today, and said that you'd be able to upgrade some netbooks on the market today using a screwdriver.

That's ridiculous. Some netbooks have hard drives.

convair
20-11-2009, 11:05 AM
I like the look of google Chrome.

Will anybody on here be trying it out?

xyz823
20-11-2009, 11:11 AM
They really are pioneering the way for online integration with your OS.

wainuitech
20-11-2009, 11:11 AM
Chrome will have very specific platform requirements. It won’t run on machines with physical hard drives, only SSDs.


Google doesn't anticipate Chrome OS being used on your desktop PCs (at least, not yet). Dual-boot will not be possible, and it won't work with your third-party peripherals that use non-standard drivers. Keyboards, mice, and USB hard drives will work, but it's extremely unlikely that you'll be able to sync your iPhone with Chrome OS. They say that they'll have a novel solution for printing in the future.

:lol: :lol: :lol: So read as a total waste of time for the average home user = CRAP OS.

As per one of the comments:
It'll be a cute fad, but a completely crippled OS does not a good idea make. So basically stick to either real operating systems that work most of the time, Windows, REAL linux Distro's, MAC OS.

gary67
20-11-2009, 11:14 AM
Re the printing option does it involve pen and paper? :sleep

xyz823
20-11-2009, 11:15 AM
:lol: :lol: :lol: So read as a total waste of time for the average home user = CRAP OS.

I don't think the home user is their target market.

gary67
20-11-2009, 11:16 AM
I don't think the home user is their target market.

Pity as the home user is the one who really drives the market

Sweep
20-11-2009, 11:18 AM
Nope.

They have progressed to quills and papyrus.

Looks like a backward step in any event.

Chilling_Silence
20-11-2009, 11:56 AM
What makes you say that it's useless?

External Keyboards / Mice / USB HDD's (And possibly USB CD drives) will all work. Digital Cameras usually have a "USB Drive" mode, or you can whip out the storage card. That leaves printers, USB networking dongles, USB Webcams (Most Netbooks have them built-in, though no word on their driver support), Firewire (?), gamepads / joysticks, PDA's / GPS (Though sync'ing over-the-air may be possible), bluetooth, tablets / barcode scanners, and USB Audio output / Video capture devices.

I dunno about you, but your netbook is named that for a reason, it's for use as an online-only portable device. If you want a laptop, buy a Toshiba L300 with Windows on it. If you have a Netbook that you almost always use as an online-only device, then yeah ChromeOS is going to be perfect for you.

Reading some of the comments on the article, some people are so narrow-minded... It is not a Desktop-OS replacement! It's for NetBooks, not your 3Ghz Quad-core, Triple SLI gaming rig. Morons...

pcuser42
20-11-2009, 11:58 AM
I dunno about you, but your netbook is named that for a reason, it's for use as an online-only portable device. If you want a laptop, buy a Toshiba L300 with Windows on it. If you have a Netbook that you almost always use as an online-only device, then yeah ChromeOS is going to be perfect for you.

To be honest, the main reason I bought my netbook was for gaming (admittedly older games), so Chrome OS may not be right for me. (Oh, and also because it was cheap. :p)

wainuitech
20-11-2009, 12:04 PM
Looking at the Home user, which is 95% of my business, in its current format and limitations it would be useless.

Out of all the home users I deal with I would guess on 1 or 2 have a netbook ( note Netbook not notebook/Laptop), that it would run on.

Hell according to the article you couldn't even try it out unless you have the right hardware.

As much as a shock it may sound, NOT every one has to be mobile :rolleyes: Meaning at least 90% of the hardware I sell is desktop PC related. (excluding usb devices, flash drives etc)

At least with a real OS, Windows and full Linux distros they will run on most hardware.

Chilling_Silence
20-11-2009, 12:08 PM
True it will run on most hardware, but I know that when I'm out and about on the road, I do 95% of my work straight from the browser, including supporting VoIP systems. What can't be done already, I've been writing ways that it *can*...

Anyways as it stands, we may find that this won't be used by the majority of home users, but by businesses? Time will tell, but there's no denying it is a specialist OS. Hell, nobody's forcing the masses to change. Good on Google for trying and putting something new out there IMO!

gary67
20-11-2009, 12:08 PM
I don't actually know anyone with a netbook, oh wait I did know someone but she had it stolen while travelling in the Philippines. And since you can't dual boot you can't try it out without losing all your data unless of course you back it up. That is why Linux has slowly got it's place due to being able to be dual booted or run from CD

Chilling_Silence
20-11-2009, 12:21 PM
How much data do you actually keep on a netbook anyways, with their generally limited hardware. Sure the lines have been blurred somewhat as manufacturers add in varying screen sizes, physical HDD's instead of SSD's etc ... but look at the original EeePC with a 4GB SSD. Perfect!

http://www.chromium.org/chromium-os

See the Fast Boot video, Security ... aah heck, watch them all ;)

pcuser42
20-11-2009, 12:22 PM
How much data do you actually keep on a netbook anyways, with their generally limited hardware. Sure the lines have been blurred somewhat as manufacturers add in varying screen sizes, physical HDD's instead of SSD's etc ... but look at the original EeePC with a 4GB SSD. Perfect!

More than you think. ;)

wainuitech
20-11-2009, 12:25 PM
Dont have a netbook - no use for them, laptop will do every thing mobile I require and desktop PC's.:D

It will be more for the business user for sure, but I think there will be a lot of disappointed people world wide that wanted to try it if they dont have the hardware.

Agent_24
20-11-2009, 01:07 PM
Looking at the Home user, which is 95% of my business, in its current format and limitations it would be useless.

Out of all the home users I deal with I would guess on 1 or 2 have a netbook ( note Netbook not notebook/Laptop), that it would run on.

Hell according to the article you couldn't even try it out unless you have the right hardware.

I recall reading an article about how if Google tries to support as much hardware as Linux and Windows does, they will have a very tough job ahead of them.

I guess they solved that problem!

I won't be using it, I don't need to. It also wouldn't do anything useful for me even if I could run it

xyz823
21-11-2009, 12:57 AM
Who said we couldn't run it in a VM?

Doubters (http://gdgt.com/google/chrome-os/download/):D

Interestingly the VirtualBox version didn't work in VirtualBox but the VMware did!

http://i697.photobucket.com/albums/vv334/darkstar2009_album/ChromeScreenshot1.png

http://i697.photobucket.com/albums/vv334/darkstar2009_album/ChromeScreenshot2.png

http://i697.photobucket.com/albums/vv334/darkstar2009_album/ChromeScreenshot3.png

http://i697.photobucket.com/albums/vv334/darkstar2009_album/ChromeScreenshot4.png

GameJunkie
21-11-2009, 05:35 AM
what da ya mean virtual box version didnt work?

notechyet
21-11-2009, 05:52 AM
Who said we couldn't run it in a VM?

Doubters (http://gdgt.com/google/chrome-os/download/):D

Interestingly the VirtualBox version didn't work in VirtualBox but the VMware did!

http://i697.photobucket.com/albums/vv334/darkstar2009_album/ChromeScreenshot1.png

http://i697.photobucket.com/albums/vv334/darkstar2009_album/ChromeScreenshot2.png

http://i697.photobucket.com/albums/vv334/darkstar2009_album/ChromeScreenshot3.png


http://i697.photobucket.com/albums/vv334/darkstar2009_album/ChromeScreenshot4.png

which install steps have you followed?

Chilling_Silence
21-11-2009, 08:12 AM
I recall reading an article about how if Google tries to support as much hardware as Linux and Windows does, they will have a very tough job ahead of them.

You must not have been reading the articles, it *is* running Linux, and as the Linux kernel contains the drivers, they're not supporting any "new" hardware, with the exception of custom stuff that they're trying to get hardware manufacturers to build.

I'm hanging for an all-day-on-battery ARM device that costs ~$400-500, but maybe that's just me ;)

Anyway here's an interesting article on it which addresses many of the concerns the posters here have had thus far, and acknowledges them as problems:
http://arstechnica.com/open-source/news/2009/11/chromeos-announcement.ars/1

Anyways, I'm off to install Virtualbox :D

Chilling_Silence
21-11-2009, 08:33 AM
Interesting from Google:
http://www.chromium.org/chromium-os/chromiumos-design-docs/security-overview

Use cases and requirements

We are initially targeting the following use cases with Chromium OS devices:
Computing on the couch
Use as a lightweight, secondary work computer
Borrowing a device for use in coffee shops and libraries
Sharing a second computer among family members

xyz823
21-11-2009, 08:34 AM
which install steps have you followed?

I didn't follow any, I just made a new virtual machine in VirtualBox and made the harddrive the .vdmk file. But when I tried to use the .vdi file it wouldn't work. I think the download may have been corrupted though.

I could get it running in VMWare but it wouldn't connect to the internet, so thats when I tried VirtualBox.

xyz823
21-11-2009, 08:45 AM
It seems like it would be a really good OS for internet cafe computers.

It is really odd to use because the internet browser -is- the operating system!

The coolest thing is that if someone stole your computer you can just relogin somewhere else and all your stuff is there! Or if you forget your computer you can just login on someone elses!

Anyone else got it installed yet? What do you think so far?

Chilling_Silence
21-11-2009, 10:04 AM
Will be installing after I've got back from some shopping with my lovely wifey...

Anyways, had a chance to watch these during the download:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJ57xzo287U
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ANMrzw7JFzA

Covers some of the "...but what about this?"

wainuitech
21-11-2009, 01:07 PM
It seems like it would be a really good OS for internet cafe computers.

It is really odd to use because the internet browser -is- the operating system!

The coolest thing is that if someone stole your computer you can just relogin somewhere else and all your stuff is there! Or if you forget your computer you can just login on someone elses!

Anyone else got it installed yet? What do you think so far? Out of a scale of 1-10, with 10 being the highest WOW/Great - 1.

Loaded it into a virutal machine on a XP PC that is quite happy to run Vista in the VM without any problems. So its not underpowered.

Chrome crashes, locks up, Their own errors (http://www.imagef1.net.nz/files/Chrome.jpg) :groan: , loaded vista and this is a pre SP1 Vista and it runs fine.

The OS would be OK for people who need to be mobile, and thats already been said, but apart from that - they can keep it thanks.

I'll stick to laptops if I want to be mobile. If I want a free OS I would use a linux Distro, prob Ubuntu.

One thing that is really annoying is you HAVE to log into google to even run the damn thing - I wouldn't trust google with all my personal work data.

At least with a real OS you can do work without the internet. An example of that was last night, we lost ours for about 30 minutes - if I had Chrome I couldn't have done a thing, but instead I did some bookwork - no internet required.

Chrome OS is basically using the idea of a dumb terminal with the exception the data is on the net instead of a local server.:sleep

Chilling_Silence
21-11-2009, 01:38 PM
I fired mine up, the VirtualBox image from the aforementioned download links didn't work but the VMWare image worked fine in VirtualBox (.vmdk).

Runs fine, not super fast, not slow, nice to see the latest 4.0-dev build of Chromium that support extensions. Tempted to try it on some real hardware, as even inside the virtual machine it only takes a few seconds to boot!

Very limited application, but that said everything I have open at the moment on my Win7 box is a browser, with the exception of Pidgin which can also easily be done in the browser (Meebo etc).
Watching those YouTube videos (Especially that 11 min one) it seems they're trying hard to make it as functional as possible.

I tried to use my USB Thumbdrive with Chrome OS, but VirtualBox wasn't loading the Win7 drivers that it needed to fast enough...

I'm excited about the possibilities, but as it stands yes, it does almost seem like it's a dumb-terminal with data stored on the web...

wainuitech
21-11-2009, 01:43 PM
Just looking on the main home page of PC world I saw an article today re MS impresion and Chrome.

In there it mentions another project that when looking at it demo in the site could be a LOT better than Chrome OS, a PC / Laptop has the ability to run a normal OS & one called Hyperspace (http://www.hyperspace.com/community) - with the touch of a button you can switch between the two - so you will have the best of both worlds.

When you think about it, we already have a similar app now, its in most Asus motherboards - called Express Gate. and that works fine.

jcr1
21-11-2009, 01:50 PM
It seems like it would be a really good OS for internet cafe computers.

It is really odd to use because the internet browser -is- the operating system!

The coolest thing is that if someone stole your computer you can just relogin somewhere else and all your stuff is there! Or if you forget your computer you can just login on someone elses!

Anyone else got it installed yet? What do you think so far?

This sounds like an extremely good idea and I must try it out on my EeePC. For saving pictures when travelling (it fits in my camera bag, because I just carry a compact) it would fit the bill nicely.
Chill, I agree with your previous comments, absolutely. Problem is, there will always be luddites. This solution will not necessarily suit everyone, but it must be tried. My EeePC fits a niche requirement that I have and I'm willing to give Chrome OS a go, because it could enhance it.

jcr1
21-11-2009, 01:53 PM
Just read this;

http://eeepc.net/old-netbooks-wont-be-able-to-run-chrome-os/

Complications already. I have an EeePC 701:(

Chilling_Silence
21-11-2009, 02:23 PM
http://gdgt.com/google/chrome-os/download/

There's one there for installing on an actual PC?

Im just gutted I sold my EeePC 701 and 900...

xyz823
21-11-2009, 04:01 PM
Hopefully there are some cool changes in a year when it is finished!

jwil1
21-11-2009, 10:37 PM
:lol: :lol: :lol: So read as a total waste of time for the average home user = CRAP OS.


Chrome will have very specific platform requirements. It won’t run on machines with physical hard drives, only SSDs.


Google doesn't anticipate Chrome OS being used on your desktop PCs (at least, not yet). Dual-boot will not be possible, and it won't work with your third-party peripherals that use non-standard drivers. Keyboards, mice, and USB hard drives will work, but it's extremely unlikely that you'll be able to sync your iPhone with Chrome OS. They say that they'll have a novel solution for printing in the future.

As per one of the comments: So basically stick to either real operating systems that work most of the time, Windows, REAL linux Distro's, MAC OS.

+1 I smell an Apple-style lockdown

Chilling_Silence
21-11-2009, 10:51 PM
Not quite. Basically you have a browser, and any plugin you want to write for it you can. Interestingly enough though the security on it is *tight* from what I can see thus far, it's going to be a dream for IT managers with all the encryption and automatic security etc!

Geek4414
23-11-2009, 09:52 AM
Interesting reading ...

http://www.tgdaily.com/trendwatch-features/43308-google-chrome-os-gcrap-reveals-the-next-netscape

Google Chrome OS: Gcrap reveals the next Netscape
Trendwatch By Rob Enderle, Principal Analyst, Enderle Group Monday, 20 July 2009 07:55

Analyst Opinion - It can be entertaining to watch companies that have learned to manage expectations. They set low bars, generally fail at what they attempt, and yet the folks in charge of the programs often get bonuses and rewards as if they had successfully executed. I believe the Windows Vista mess was mainly caused by Microsoft’s behavior. Similar behavior effectively killed a long line of companies starting with DEC and running all the way to Sun. Google’s new Chrome OS looks to be another example of people more interested in pretending to be doing something, rather than actually doing it well.

Google’s Chrome OS is largely a copy of what others have done in the past. It looks like an interesting strategic move, but it is being ineptly executed and the metric for success internally appears to simply get the product out the door. This was very similar to the initial release of Windows Vista and we all know how that turned out. Let’s have a closer look at Google Gcrap 1.0.


Opportunity

A blind man could see that the opportunity for the Google Chrome OS is huge. The Windows market stalled on Windows XP, Apple has been gaining share, and the migration from Windows XP to Windows 7 could be ugly. All someone has to do is have something compelling in the market as an alternative during the Windows 7 launch and taking share should be as easy as 1-2-3. When I say something compelling, I mean a product that embraces the Windows XP installed base and promises to save those users from future painful migrations while allowing them to enjoy most of what they enjoy now.

Snow Leopard comes the closest of any Apple OS to doing this and it will hit the market 30 days before Windows 7 does, showcasing a combination of market savvy and technical execution. The problem with Snow Leopard is that it isn’t hardware independent and the related hardware is very expensive during a year when folks don’t have a lot of extra money. This will cut down on how much share Apple will take sharply. But it is clear that Apple will take share.


Google Chrome Late and Lame

The initial strategy that Google appeared to be executing was in three phases. The first was with Google Apps and once a large number of people were on Apps, the second with Google Chrome would have eliminated the hard tie to Windows (you would run Apps and other Google Applications in the Chrome browser). The third, Chrome OS, would eliminate the Windows requirement and promises huge market share gain for Google. The problem is Google Apps didn’t do that well, the Chrome browser wasn’t very exciting either, and now the Google Chrome OS is announced before the foundation moves have been made – essentially alerting Microsoft and giving them a year to think up a response.

If Google wanted to run against Windows 7, which is the ideal target as Windows 7 is no Vista and once users move to it, they are unlikely to move again. Google needs to be in market this year. There are several products that are virtually identical to what Google is planning on building, suggesting they could have simply bought one. The best is Phoenix Hyperspace , a product that was designed to emulate the Apple experience. It would have worked well with Google Apps and had a fast and compliant browser. Designed by the firm most famous for selling BIOS, they could have acquired the company cheaply and gotten a suite of products that would have strengthened their much needed OEM relationships for the coming fight with Microsoft. With Hyperspace, they could have had a product in the market now and be ramping during the time when Microsoft is weakest and before Apple’s own program started. Granted, initially they would only be on netbooks - not ARM based Smartbooks (which aren’t ready yet anyway) - but they would have hit the market at the ideal time for their now accelerated strategy.

Instead, Google is going to reinvent the wheel a year after Windows 7 (and about the time Windows 7 SP1 is due) window opened and that typically doesn’t end well.


Google’s disaster

This circumstance has revealed three critical weaknesses in Google. They don’t fundamentally understand either marketing or PR, which goes to the core of why Apps and the Chrome Browser have failed and why Chrome OS is likely to fail. They apparently have “not invented here” as a policy, which is why they are building and not buying an OS, and they are awash with executives who are avoiding doing their jobs and have developed an expertise in managing expectations instead (inside Google, I’m sure, both Apps and the Chrome browser are seen as brilliant successes.)

This isn’t to say that Microsoft doesn’t have many of the same problems. You and I could probably go down a list of things like Mira, Origami, IE, MSN, and even Windows, which have been either killed or badly hurt by some or all of these behaviors. But Microsoft is the dominant vendor and it takes a lot to kill a vendor once it is dominant. Google is a challenging vendor and in the one place where they are dominant, search, Microsoft has suddenly begun to take share largely by hitting Google with an excellent marketing campaign.

The idea that simply building a product will get people to move to it, which appears to be the core of Google’s strategy on everything, is common to an engineering driven company where no one has studied or understands human behavior. It is the polar opposite of Apple who has taken share from Microsoft. This is ironic given that Google’s primary revenue source is advertising. But it is clear that Google simply doesn’t understand to advertise itself. If every company advertised like Google, Google would be broke.

“Not Invented Here” is why HP doesn’t have a more compelling competitor to the iPhone, it is partially why Palm didn’t have the iPod, and it probably goes to the core of why the PS3 was such a disaster for Sony. It is not an uncommon problem and you wonder why Google didn’t just take over Firefox or buy Opera, or in this latest case, buy Phoenix to get what they wanted in a working product quickly.

Finally, I think the real company killer is staff that knows how to game Google’s management system rather than doing their jobs. Google is bleeding key people, cutting benefits to contain costs, because the folks that are left are increasingly not getting the job done. And a death spiral is likely next on the list for this company as a result. They only have to look at DEC, Netscape, and Sun to see how much fun one of those is. Granted the people who caused it will be long gone by this time and living the good life. But the remaining Google investors and employees won’t be thinking kind thoughts of them.

For instance, where is Android really? Right now, in terms of interest, it follows Apple, RIM and Palm. 4th place like a bullet is hardly a winning proposition, but I’ll bet there are folks in Google getting bonuses for it.


Wrapping up: Google may be the next Netscape

Google has been an amazing success story and, to assure their success, they could learn something from Apple that has executed sharply in most areas this decade. However, they seem to be learning from Netscape and the result will be painful for a lot of people unless this is corrected. See Netscape as an example of the things that are company killers which include an inability to market, an unwillingness to consider existing work outside the company, and executives who are more interested in building empires, income, and getting higher titles than making their company more successful.

Google could have made a difference, and it still can, but is currently on a path that suggests they may have some very tough years ahead, unless their folks roll up their sleeves and get the job done.


Rob Enderle is one of the last Inquiry Analysts. Inquiry Analysts are paid to stay up to date on current events and identify trends and either explain the trends or make suggestions, tactical and strategic, on how to best take advantage of them. Currently he provides his services to most of the major technology and media companies.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the writer.


HyperSpace and Splashtop instant on/off demo on YouTube ...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WhBboztKSt8&NR=1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hw08_mCsc58&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yChLjTuM9Z8&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qd_kZhbXkXA&feature=related

Geek4414
23-11-2009, 04:41 PM
More interesting reading on the InstantOn OSes ...

Google Chrome - an introduction through a comic bookhttp://www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/small_00.html

The Death of Windows
http://www.slate.com/id/2220371/pagenum/all/#p2

Phoenix’s 1-Second Instant Boot Bios Really Works
http://blog.laptopmag.com/phoenixs-1-second-instant-boot-bios-really-works

Can Phoenix's HyperSpace Become the Ultimate Instant-On OS?
http://techgage.com/news/can_phoenixs_hyperspace_become_the_ultimate_instan t-on_os/

Chilling_Silence
23-11-2009, 07:01 PM
Thats a massive amount of fluff for an article that doesn't really state much about Chrome OS :p