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View Full Version : Installing to D Not C drive



gary67
13-09-2009, 12:22 PM
If I install programs to my D drive does that mean I can reinstall my OS to the C drive without having to reinstall the programs or would I still need to reinstall them after I reinstall my OS?

I want to install Win 7 on my new comp and use the RC then when it comes out next month install the final bought version and not have to reinstall all my programs is that possible?

:thanks:thanks

Speedy Gonzales
13-09-2009, 12:25 PM
No, because you'll probably have to reinstall Win7 anyway (not upgrade from the RC version)

gary67
13-09-2009, 12:27 PM
Cool that's what I wanted to know, I'll wait a month then thanks Speedy

gary67
13-09-2009, 02:05 PM
If once the machine is set up I install to D will reinstalling the OS be able to be done without re installing programs? Or would they still need reinstalling?

Speedy Gonzales
13-09-2009, 02:13 PM
Probably not. The programs need to have info in the registry, (so they'll work) and doing the clean install, it wont have anything in the registry, for whatever program

gary67
13-09-2009, 02:16 PM
I was thinking that but didn't know for sure, so can't see any advantage really of installing to D

SolMiester
13-09-2009, 02:51 PM
I was thinking that but didn't know for sure, so can't see any advantage really of installing to D

A lot of games dont need to install registry settings, which is why my games have their own partition G:, I use S: for storage and point my documents back to that partition. My M: is for music and V: for video....If I lose C: its not a big deal...!

Blam
13-09-2009, 04:23 PM
I want to install Win 7 on my new comp and use the RC then when it comes out next month install the final bought version and not have to reinstall all my programs is that possible?

:thanks:thanks

It is possible to upgrade from the RC to the RTM. I have done it myself on 3 machines already using this method.

http://www.askvg.com/how-to-upgrade-from-windows-7-rc-to-rtm-build/

Blam

gary67
13-09-2009, 05:17 PM
So if I bought Win 7 I would need to copy the disc to my HDD and change the file then copy to another disc and run setup is that right Blam, Thanks for the site looks useful

Blam
13-09-2009, 07:44 PM
So if I bought Win 7 I would need to copy the disc to my HDD and change the file then copy to another disc and run setup is that right Blam, Thanks for the site looks useful

Yep, using something like imgburn you would create an image of the DVD, then modify the created iso file using something like PowerISO or UltraISO and then burn it back to a DVD or better yet, to a flash drive(faster installation) using WinToFlash (http://wintoflash.com/)

There are pretty much no free ISO editors, but you can get UltraISO free through a promo here (http://www.raymond.cc/forum/freebies/12282-free-ultraiso-v9-full-license-key.html)

Alternatively, you could mount the ISO, modify the files then rebuilt the ISO, or extract the files from the ISO using 7zip and rebuilt the image using ImgBurn.

Cheers
Blam

Agent_24
14-09-2009, 03:10 PM
You will lose any registry entries, start menu shortcuts etc

You may also have to delete the old programs before you reinstall them, I did a repair install on my windows XP once, when I tried to reinstall programs, the installers would go nuts because everything was already there in the folder, yet according to XP registry, the program was not installed

gary67
14-09-2009, 05:36 PM
As I suspected so why do people install programs separate to the OS?

Agent_24
14-09-2009, 06:05 PM
Better performance than having programs + windows + pagefile all on the same drive

Also, you could easily upgrade the "programs" drive to a bigger one without having to reinstall windows.

Only things I can think of

fred_fish
15-09-2009, 02:17 PM
Having a (smallish) separate system partition also allows easy backup by imaging the partition.
If you have your data & progs stored/installed elsewhere it is very easy to go back to a recent image in case of probs.

Sort of like "System Restore" but actually works!

gary67
15-09-2009, 06:17 PM
Welcome to PF1 Fred fish, I already use Acronis and do daily backups of my whole system but good point

fred_fish
15-09-2009, 06:45 PM
Cheers. Been lurking for a while, just signed up.

The image backup is ideal for system partitions as it gets the whole 'state' of the system.
The problem is that restoring it nukes everything since your last backup which is not so good for constantly changing data.

I prefer to keep my data on a separate partition and do incremental file based backups of that. That way you can easily pull previous versions of single files to restore.

It is easy in most Linux dists with a separate /home partition but is also quite achievable in windows.

gary67
15-09-2009, 07:56 PM
Yeah I have an OS partition and a data partition now and just image them once an week and then daily incremental backups so hopefully always up to date

mzee
17-09-2009, 12:27 AM
When you have installed your W7, make an Image of it with a back up programme, I use Acronis but there are many, Norton 12, paragon etc.

This way you should be able to restore the system in a few minutes. You will also be able to disable 'System restore' which wastes space & stores malware etc.

You should only have to install Windows once. I have just restored Vista on a Lap top, it took 15 minutes, including all software.

gary67
17-09-2009, 07:45 AM
I already use Acronis on this XP machine and both the other ones in the house, was just wondering why people install programs to another partition and what benifits if any there were, which it seems there isn't really it's just personal choice

FIAT LUX
17-09-2009, 09:37 AM
I already use Acronis on this XP machine and both the other ones in the house


Great to see how many people that uses (understands the value of) backup around here.


was just wondering why people install programs to another partition and what benifits if any there were, which it seems there isn't really it's just personal choice

Back in time when drives were smaller it were more often used as people simply didn't have the drive C: capacity.

Nowadays You might be able to use "Installing to D Not C drive" as some sort of "trick" if you want to use more than one "installations"/"setups" on drive C: and you wanted to save time making and loading different partition C: image based harddrive backups, then you could for speed reasons on one of the C: "installations"/"setups" install the programs to D: if you did not need the programs on the other C: "installation"/"setup". Doing so might enable you to take a smaller image based harddrive backup of the C: "installation"/"setup" partition where programs were installed to D: . (all this if you wanted to use 2 "installations"/"setups" on drive C: and switch C: "installation"/"setup" through loading harddrive-images)(With small enough amount of data on a drive C: partition + using the right software + haveing fast enough harddrive/s one can load an XP backup in a couple of minutes or less? - which makes switching O.S. blazingly fast!)
However , it should be duely noticed that one has to be aware of the (as far as I know undocumented or not widely known) fact that M.S. Windows when booting (sometimes?) looks for certain folders on other drives and one can make a real mess of things if not knowing this (one only finds out if one notices that something has gone wrong!!!) - I've seen some pretty weird stuff with M.S. Windows in my time !!!

Generally the principles I myself apply(/applied) and recommend(ed) is(were) to put the O.S. plus all programs that one would want installed onto drive C: and take image based harddrive backup(s) of that. And then put or keep much of the "personal content" that one just want "laying around on the harddrive" (pictures sound and movie files, ecetera) on another partition.
I then use(d) and recommend(ed) the priciple to understand what "personal content" on drive C: that changes and then take a file backup to optical storage (CD/DVD) of that once in a while. This also because most people don't understand how to take backups or use them and because I always (did) recommend to make atleast one complete image based partition C: backup to "optical storage" in case of hardware breakdowns/loss . Nowadays however one has acess to high speed external storage devices , such as USB attached harddrives and partitions/installations has grown so big (plus newer software with newer capabilities has arrived) that it's often preferred to keep one or more backup on internal drives and the same to external drives. (thus having a copy in case of any of the drives breakdown).
Also nowadays Internet Service Providers (and other companies) often provide people with the opportunity to use internet based storage and sometimes also equip people with accompanying to-internet-backupsoftware that people can install and use to have taken constantly backup of alterered personal drive C: content in the background wheter they know how to use this or understand it or not (that is once it is installed and running), then if they got a "basic" image based drive C: backup they got their stuff backed-up and only needs assistance in case of breakdowns (if they do not understand how to use the backups - optical/USB/internet/whatever) .
Ofcourse it should go without saying that if one keeps "personal content" (pictures sound and movie files, ecetera) on another partition than drive C: then one ofcourse should make a backup of that if one wants to be sure not to loose it.

Personally I will however "change strategy" as the the emergence of Microsoft Windows Home Server makes it possible to have all drive C: patitions backed-up automatically over home-network. This will minimize the workload of having to making extra backup to external storage and combined with on-computer-kept-one-time-backup and periodical, to optical storage, backup of "important personal content" I think that would be an "OK" "solution".

For those of you that do not know this then Microsoft offers 25GB of free webspace (called "Skydrive (http://skydrive.live.com/)") to people in connection with Windows Live ID . (max file size=50MB) Once one understand how to use it one can transfer large amount of files to "Skydrive (http://skydrive.live.com/)". ("Skydrive (http://skydrive.live.com/)" does at present not support "folder backup" but only "file backup") .

fred_fish
17-09-2009, 10:06 AM
For those of you that do not know this then Microsoft offers 25GB of free webspace (called "Skydrive (http://skydrive.live.com/)") to people in connection with Windows Live ID . (max file size=50MB) Once one understand how to use it one can transfer large amount of files to "Skydrive (http://skydrive.live.com/)". ("Skydrive (http://skydrive.live.com/)" does at present not support "folder backup" but only "file backup") .

Hmmmm.... "All your data are belong to us ...."

FIAT LUX
17-09-2009, 10:33 AM
Hmmmm.... "All your data are belong to us ...."

Quite Right :D (I agree with you)
But should I let all my personal views or preferrences influence my "conversations" with others these conversations would be impossible.
I just mentioned the information - what people wishes to do with it is up to them.
Also - you didn't see my write that I uses any kind of internet-backup/storage personally (though I might consider it in the future for non personal stuff/semi-non personal stuff) (I don't even use "net-banking" yet - an attitude that is considered rather "backwards" by others - also never uses "plastic" to pay with except "when can't be avoided" "on-line" - don't even know the "pins" for my "plastics" !!!!)