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Digby
30-08-2009, 11:16 AM
Hi Guys,

Sorry to be a bit depressing, but my father just died and was cremated the other day, after a short illness.

My mother (and I) want to know what happens to the casket - we paid for a wooden one - and my fathers ashes ?

Eg surely if the casket is burned (as it is supposed to be) then there would be a lot of ashes. (far more than a small urn ?) So what are the ashes we will get ? What percentage of those will be wood and what will be of my father ?

I checked out Wikepedia and they did not cover this in detail.

Regards
Digby

qazwsxokmijn
30-08-2009, 11:23 AM
My condolences, Digby. :(

I do not know the exact details, but when my grandmother's remains were dug up (her grave was being unmaintained by the people we paid to maintain) to be cremated, it was only her remains that got cremated. No casket or any container. It wasn't in NZ as she isn't in NZ, though, so I don't know what happens here.

Trev
30-08-2009, 11:30 AM
http://www.google.co.nz/search?hl=en&source=hp&q=cremation&meta=cr%3DcountryNZ&aq=7&oq=crem
:)

Sweep
30-08-2009, 11:32 AM
Sorry to hear that. Here is a link that may help.

http://www.funeralsnewzealand.co.nz/index.cfm?objectid=DF3DBD7A-1321-AE99-69761B9CBE193F24

qazwsxokmijn
30-08-2009, 11:35 AM
Or you could try weighing the casket and gain a percentage from that.....say, if the casket is 10kg and your father is 80kg, that means 11.1% of the ashes would be the casket.

Terry Porritt
30-08-2009, 12:56 PM
Or you could try weighing the casket and gain a percentage from that.....say, if the casket is 10kg and your father is 80kg, that means 11.1% of the ashes would be the casket.

It doesn't work that way. Wood and bone are entirely different. Most of the wood ash is consumed by the intense heat and is turned to CO2, so if one is bothered by this question, rest assured that most of the ash will in fact be the residual remains of the body.

Cremation ashes are surprisingly heavy.

We had a large Labrador cremated last year, and the ashes we received weighed , from memory, nearly the same as my Dads.
There may not be the same controls though over animal cremation as human cremation.

qazwsxokmijn
30-08-2009, 12:58 PM
It doesn't work that way. Wood and bone are entirely different. Most of the wood ash is consumed by the intense heat and is turned to CO2, so if one is bothered by this question, rest assured that most of the ash will in fact be the residual remains of the body.
Ah....didn't think of it that way.

Cicero
30-08-2009, 02:01 PM
It doesn't work that way. Wood and bone are entirely different. Most of the wood ash is consumed by the intense heat and is turned to CO2, so if one is bothered by this question, rest assured that most of the ash will in fact be the residual remains of the body.

Cremation ashes are surprisingly heavy.

We had a large Labrador cremated last year, and the ashes we received weighed , from memory, nearly the same as my Dads.
There may not be the same controls though over animal cremation as human cremation.

And that Ter is where we end up and not that far away,now isn't that morbid.!

Terry Porritt
30-08-2009, 02:14 PM
And that Ter is where we end up and not that far away,now isn't that morbid.!

Not long to go now Cic, who will get there first ? :clap

Sweep
30-08-2009, 02:17 PM
I don't see anyone jumping up and down and saying, "Me first!!"

Myself included for that matter. :-)

Renmoo
30-08-2009, 02:56 PM
Sorry to hear about the news, Digby :(

Cicero
30-08-2009, 03:34 PM
I don't see anyone jumping up and down and saying, "Me first!!"

Myself included for that matter. :-)

The fact is,the end will come when it will come.

pctek
30-08-2009, 03:35 PM
So what are the ashes we will get ? What percentage of those will be wood and what will be of my father ?


It's all burnt, coffin, lining, clothes etc etc.

So, no disrespect but it's why I went with my second choice in my will of having the bare minimum, a cardboard coffin, no fancy bits, no ceremonies. Burn it and be done.

The point is to remember and mourn the person anyway, you can do that without knowing the percentage. To be honest though bone is the part that is the hardest to burn and most of the remains (apart from bits of metal etc) would be that.

prefect
30-08-2009, 03:42 PM
The fact is,the end will come when it will come.
The end is nigh lol

prefect
30-08-2009, 03:44 PM
It's all burnt, coffin, lining, clothes etc etc.

So, no disrespect but it's why I went with my second choice in my will of having the bare minimum, a cardboard coffin, no fancy bits, no ceremonies. Burn it and be done.

The point is to remember and mourn the person anyway, you can do that without knowing the percentage. To be honest though bone is the part that is the hardest to burn and most of the remains (apart from bits of metal etc) would be that.

They would take the handles off wonder if the cremators give them back or do they sell them to the scrap man for social club money?

SurferJoe46
30-08-2009, 03:44 PM
I still have the ashes from my first born son and the box weighs about 4# or almost 2 kilos.

The volume of the container (rectangular/square) is about 10"x6"x8" or 25.4cm x 15.2 cm x 20.3 cm.

I scattered my wife's ashes and believe me they are rather stone-like in texture and color - ashen white-ish gray and smaller than a small fingernail.

By law in the US it is required that the casket of a suitable burial container be cremated with the body, so it too is in ashes, but I believe that they use a special container that is totally mass-less after the fire.

My dad has now been scattered (this weekend) and my buddy will be scattered next.

Cicero
30-08-2009, 04:03 PM
I still have the ashes from my first born son and the box weighs about 4# or almost 2 kilos.

The volume of the container (rectangular/square) is about 10"x6"x8" or 25.4cm x 15.2 cm x 20.3 cm.

I scattered my wife's ashes and believe me they are rather stone-like in texture and color - ashen white-ish gray and smaller than a small fingernail.

By law in the US it is required that the casket of a suitable burial container be cremated with the body, so it too is in ashes, but I believe that they use a special container that is totally mass-less after the fire.

My dad has now been scattered (this weekend) and my buddy will be scattered next.

Seems that we like to spread ourselves around.

SurferJoe46
30-08-2009, 04:16 PM
Digby:

There's one thing that might bother you a little, but don't let it get to you as people mean to say something, but they can some times not say the right things.

One that bothered me at first until I understood the reason for the statement was: "I know just how you feel" - which of course, they do NOT.

It happens and we tend to say to ourselves "No you don't! I feel this way and there's no way YOU can feel like I do".

I know the feeling as I've been there a number of times already myself.

Please accept my deepest feelings for you at this time and remember that the memorial is for those who survive the passed one, and it should be a time of closure, not being upset when people try but don't really know the right things to say in the circumstances. They mean only the best of things for you at this time as do I.

This too, will pass.

.

blanco
30-08-2009, 09:33 PM
My local crem carries out more than 20 per day and I have
often wondered how they ensure good seperation of the ashes.
In other words, do you get a mixture of ashes?
Any of you work in a crem to answer this?

wellyg33k
30-08-2009, 10:33 PM
Blanco: I would like to think that they do a decent job at clearing it out each time. I do know for animals unless you go to a good place, they'll do a few animals at a time so what you get will only be part your friend. This is why we've had a look around already (even though our dogs are about 1 and 2) to make sure we know what we're going to be in for before that time comes and end up just going to the most convenient/first option.

If a crematorium did anything like that I don't think they'd be around very long after it was made public. But, uhh, if it is common knowledge and that is in fact true, I think I might buy some thermite and make my family do it for me.

Marnie
30-08-2009, 10:49 PM
Deepest sympathy on the loss of your Dad.

blanco
31-08-2009, 12:11 AM
wellyg: Let,s face it - not everyone is consciencious and
thorough in their workplace, so I just wondered if
there was a foolproof system in place.?

SurferJoe46
31-08-2009, 09:15 AM
You can always practice the Viking Funeral arrangements if you need to know that your loved one is the only person in the pyre:


1) Place recently deceased person ("recently" is the preferred operative here) in long wooden rental boat, lashed to the foremast or rudder is the prescribed position but is immaterial to final effect
2) Load fire wood, gasoline, diesel fuel and other fire accelerators into boat around passenger
3) Place small candle with a 15-minute wick in the boat, inside a pan of fuel,
4) Light candle, protected from drafts and splashing water.
5) Push boat into prevailing wind to ensure it goes away from land.
6) Watch for smoke
7) Hoist multiple flagons of fermented mead (Mjöd) in final respect

Or the Aleut-Eskimo practice:

1) Take one village old person who should be most likely to die next
2) Place said person on a small ice floe, about two times larger than the height of the old person when lying down.
3) Obtain 5lbs of comestible blubber, a knife, some firewood, three matches and place all on ice floe
4) Push ice floe with entire cargo including old person into current to insure that it goes away from shore.
5) Go whale or seal hunting in final respects.

Various cultures had their own funerary processes:

Muslim funeral biers,
Roman "cena novendialis",
Entombing in sepulchers,
Mummification,
The Japanese act of Matsugo-no-mizu and then the six coins on the deceased's chest to pay the fee to cross The River Of Three Hells,
The Zoroastrian excarnation - like the American Indians - (who) left the dead exposed to be eaten by wild animals and insects since the Zoroastrian believes that fire is sacred and should not be defiled by cremating a human body. I think the Indians were just too lazy to dig a hole.

My mom, (until she died first) was worried that my dad would precede her (but he didn't) and thought that there was only one way to keep his retirement and Social Security checks coming in - she'd have him stuffed in a standing position and animated with a beer glass in his hand.

She would - on alternate days - then push him to the front window of the house and plug him in and he'd hoist the beer to his lips, simulating his favorite pastime.

The neighbors would see that and think he was still alive - and so would the authorities and that way the checks would still come in the mail.


|~~~|

I remember going to my uncle Ed's funeral - Olde Italian-type who had the whole "Piatto di spaghetti": an open coffin, hired wailers, 24-hour wake, crying, screaming, shaking the body and placing mirrors under his nostrils to see if he might somehow still be breathing.

When the casket was being lowered into the grave, the top was still opened and all the relatives threw coins, rosaries, prayer books and such into it.

The brothers (he had four) were all trying to out-do each other with larger and larger dollars - it started off with $10s, then went to $20s and then $100s.

Finally one brother "Charlie" wrote a check for twenty five million dollars and tossed that in.

He won but Uncle Ed never cashed it for some reason.

Digby
31-08-2009, 06:21 PM
Thanks Guys
Thanks for the sympathy and kind thoughts.
My Dad had a good innings 86 years, the last 10 or so as a PC user ! with my help and from here - eg Hi-Jack This etc.
Thanks also for the comments and links on how the cremation process works.

Regards
Digby

wellyg33k
31-08-2009, 11:18 PM
wellyg: Let,s face it - not everyone is consciencious and
thorough in their workplace, so I just wondered if
there was a foolproof system in place.?

I would really damn hope so! D: