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Colpol
18-08-2009, 10:04 AM
How do opticians test people who have intellectual disabilities and are unable to communicate or understand?
Also I sometimes see babies wearing glasses. Obviously to young to communicate and say when it looks correct when being tested.

R2x1
18-08-2009, 10:08 AM
When communicating with seriously "comprehensionally challenged" people, it is easiest to ask the party whips to deal with them.

With babies, at least in Ponsonby, it is only important that the frame be fashionable.

Sweep
18-08-2009, 10:21 AM
I have only been to the "Gluepot" twice in my lifetime.

Perhaps this explains why I don't wear optical enhancements even now.

Trev
18-08-2009, 12:44 PM
Are you a bit of a sniffer Sweep ?
:)

Sweep
18-08-2009, 03:10 PM
Nope. It was a famous pub in Ponsonby.

Once the three lamps.

http://mytudorhouse.blogspot.com/2009/06/iconic-gluepot-in-auckland.html

It ain't a pub or music venue now I see.

One less reason for me to go to Auckland.

somebody
18-08-2009, 03:17 PM
How do opticians test people who have intellectual disabilities and are unable to communicate or understand?
Also I sometimes see babies wearing glasses. Obviously to young to communicate and say when it looks correct when being tested.

A lot of opticians have a machine that can detect the level of correction necessary for each eye. They basically get you to look into a machine, then the machine prints out the prescription for your glasses. They will then manually check it by setting up the machine which you look through to the same prescription, and make minor tweaks to see whether it's better or worse with astigmatism correction and so on.

Presumably, people with intellectual disabilities (or otherwise cannot communicate) would simply use the machine, without the follow-up check.

R2x1
18-08-2009, 03:22 PM
I think that Ponsonby's only reason for existence is to give people somewhere to point at when they look where the Gluepot used to be. Otherwise it is just a road obstruction.

Terry Porritt
18-08-2009, 03:26 PM
And adding a bit to somebody's explanation Google says: they use an instrument called a 'retinoscope'

http://www.framesdirectblog.com/vision-prescriptions-for-babies-how/

In fact there are a number sites that Google throws up explaining how they do it.

R2x1
18-08-2009, 03:29 PM
When dealing with "seasoned practitioners" is it safe to assume we should take what they say with a grain of salt, with no need to put any on them?

Colpol
18-08-2009, 04:15 PM
Thanks Terry and SB.
Amaising what technology can do.

Terry Porritt
18-08-2009, 04:28 PM
For some history on the topic visit this site, it's very interesting:

http://www.college-optometrists.org/index.aspx/pcms/site.college.What_We_Do.museyeum.online_exhibition s.optical_instruments.retinoscopes/

The first retinoscope yielding actual quantitative prescription measurements goes back to 1880.

Jen
18-08-2009, 06:19 PM
Interesting question Colpol, something I've wondered myself.

Poppa John
18-08-2009, 06:26 PM
So there is some hope for me then? PJ

Nomad
18-08-2009, 06:45 PM
I was in Malaysia when I got some $120 prescription sunglasses or with a hard coat for $150 - where as in NZ would of been $400+. :D

They have a machine that measures your eye's reaction by just looking at it and the machines will just come into focus - ideally for children or those who cannot speak the local lang I guess. Then I went into a dark room for fine tuning.

To get glasses overseas is easy. You walk in without an appt and you do the eye test straight away. You come back the same evening or next day and it is all done - lenses cut / tinted / framed up.

bk T
18-08-2009, 07:45 PM
...

To get glasses overseas is easy. You walk in without an appt and you do the eye test straight away. You come back the same evening or next day and it is all done - lenses cut / tinted / framed up.

Interestingly, one doesn't have to pay a single cent to the "Professional Optician" who performs the vision tests. Whereas in NZ the cost of the eye test is around $40 + (correct me if I'm wrong as haven't been to the Optician for ages now.)

Nomad
18-08-2009, 07:47 PM
Interestingly, one doesn't have to pay a single cent to the "Professional Optician" who performs the vision tests. Whereas in NZ the cost of the eye test is around $40 + (correct me if I'm wrong as haven't been to the Optician for ages now.)

Yep it was free eye test. In NZ they want $40 eye test or abouts, $120 for frames rock bottom, $120 for the lens or $180 for the hard index. All up ..:horrified Then when I get the frames I like cos in NZ the cheap ones aren't much selection, the frame itself could be $400+ My last pair I got in NZ 2006 was $600. After my pair from Hong Kong broke.

Bugger I may need to get some disposable contacts soon in NZ cos I don't wear them often enof to justify the liquids for perm lenses. That I was told I need a $40 eye test cos it has been a yr since I had it even if my prescription is stable. Then I need to pay another $150 or such to try diff lenses out and for the specialist's fee.

Nomad
18-08-2009, 07:54 PM
Interestingly, one doesn't have to pay a single cent to the "Professional Optician" who performs the vision tests. Whereas in NZ the cost of the eye test is around $40 + (correct me if I'm wrong as haven't been to the Optician for ages now.)

Many places in NZ tend to run via suppliers. The Optometrist in NZ is really just a showroom or another shop. If you request frames in the brochure they tend to order from supplier. If you go to another and order they cannot cos the supplier may have one in stock. Then when you do your eye test, the front of the shop with the frames and stuff is really just a showroom, the Optometrist has no say in it, the sales assistant run that department. Pick your frames that they try to up sell to you, then they up sell the high index 9% more clarity lenses to you, then they send it away for a week to have it cut and stuff, cos most of them don't have their own opticians.

If on the other hand, you have your glasses scratched up or broken and want new lenses, even if you did your eye test with them and paid $40 they still charge your $30 because you didn't buy your frames from them (!) - my experience. Then they send them away for a week to somewhere else to get them installed and lenses cut for you.

robsonde
18-08-2009, 08:12 PM
How do opticians test people who have intellectual disabilities and are unable to communicate or understand?
Also I sometimes see babies wearing glasses. Obviously to young to communicate and say when it looks correct when being tested.

an optician can get a good idea of what is needed by using a ophthalmometer. (look in to the magic box.)
this lets then measure dioptric power using an estimation of refractive index.
depending on the skills of the optician they can get to about 0.5 or 0.25 of a diopter.

many opticians have a "instant" test setup in a shopping mall.
this is just using a ophthalmometer to get a quick idea of if the person needs glasses, and if they do then a detailed test can be done.



BTW I don't work in the trade but I do spend a few hours a month in the opticians chair, getting my contacts worked on.
after 15 years you pickup on what all the toys are, how they work and such.

and yes that line says "a few hours a month"...