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View Full Version : Common sense prevails in some of our schools



somebody
15-08-2009, 04:42 PM
It's great to see a return to letting kids be kids, rather than wrapping them up in cotton wool: http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/education/2756037/Students-let-off-steam-as-bullrush-ban-overturned

Erayd
15-08-2009, 05:15 PM
:thumbs:

Edit: Rather ironically, this (http://www.kiwiblog.co.nz/2009/08/rewarding_achievement_above_effort.html) turned up in my feedreader immediately after reading this thread...

user
15-08-2009, 07:53 PM
I used to enjoy our games of bullrush in primary school in the sixties, until they banned it. Part of the reason was the damage to clothes but this may have been simply the reason given to the kids at the time.

Interestingly, we always knew it as barbardor, not as bullrush. This was in Chch. Did anyone else know it by this name?

R.M.
15-08-2009, 08:14 PM
We called it 'Running across' - in the '50s. Same game, but not banned...

Sweep
15-08-2009, 08:57 PM
We used to call it Bullrush.

Not bannned.

1959 or so.

I had never heard it called by another name.

Kindel
16-08-2009, 04:19 AM
I used to enjoy our games of bullrush in primary school in the sixties, until they banned it. Part of the reason was the damage to clothes but this may have been simply the reason given to the kids at the time.

Interestingly, we always knew it as barbardor, not as bullrush. This was in Chch. Did anyone else know it by this name?

I enjoyed it in primary school in the late 90s/year 2000. Also in 3rd and 4th form in 01/02.

At primary it was banned in my final year but we still played it, at secondary there were no issues with it to my knowledge.

John H
16-08-2009, 07:46 AM
Interestingly, we always knew it as barbardor, not as bullrush. This was in Chch. Did anyone else know it by this name?

I thought it was called "bar the door" in North Canterbury.

user
16-08-2009, 08:37 AM
I thought it was called "bar the door" in North Canterbury.

That name makes sense. Perhaps we got a misheard name for it?

zqwerty
16-08-2009, 09:50 AM
In Northern Rhodesia we called it Red Rover.

gary67
16-08-2009, 10:02 AM
In England we called it British Bulldog I'm sure it's the same game we used to play at scouts and occasionally school through the 70's

Sweep
16-08-2009, 10:58 AM
In England we called it British Bulldog I'm sure it's the same game we used to play at scouts and occasionally school through the 70's

It was called British Bulldog in scouting and bullrush at school in my day. ( 50's )

No more violent than Rugby ( various codes ) are today in my opinion.

Thinking about that one I noticed this today:-

http://home.nzcity.co.nz/news/article.aspx?id=103887&fm=psp,tst

Cicero
16-08-2009, 11:05 AM
They expect boys to cook and vacuum these days,can you believe?

John H
16-08-2009, 11:34 AM
That name makes sense. Perhaps we got a misheard name for it?

Possibly. Perhaps I misheard the name! I hadn't thought of it for years until your post rang long unheard bells for me. Sigh.

From somewhere in the deep recesses of forgotten memories, I have dredged up the notion that bar the door was Mainland usage, and bullrush was the term used on that offshore island to the north. Probably fantasy on my part.

John H
16-08-2009, 11:45 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_bulldogs_%28game%29

http://www.victoria.ac.nz/lals/research/playground/docs/lip65.pdf

No reference to bar the door, or any particular regional variations in NZ.

Ah, it is referred to in "Children's Games In Street And Playground: Chasing, Catching, Seeking" by Iona Archibald Opie; and Peter Opie.

Games in which a player attempts to intercept other players who are obliged to move from one designated place to another (often from one side of a road to another), and who if caught either take the catcher's place or, more often, assist him:
(snip)
Bar the Door. The catcher names a player to attempt the crossing on his own.
British Bulldog (1). The catcher has to use force to stop a player from crossing
British Bulldog (2). As `Bar the Door', but catcher has to use force to stop player from crossing.