PDA

View Full Version : "Your right to download - could it be legislated away?"



somebody
06-08-2009, 07:29 PM
"Your right to download - could it be legislated away?" - Quote from the Close Up promo on movie/music piracy.

It seems Mark Sainsbury thinks that downloading pirated movies is legal. This quote has been repeated in at least the last two Close Up promos this evening - seems like a blatant attempt at misleading the public.

convair
06-08-2009, 08:00 PM
I guess that means that any programs that we buy online we can't download if this comes into law.

somebody
06-08-2009, 08:08 PM
I guess that means that any programs that we buy online we can't download if this comes into law.

Downloading pirated movies and TV shows, regardless whether or not you could buy them online, was always illegal - it's nothing new.

Speedy Gonzales
06-08-2009, 08:31 PM
Well no nothing wrong with buying whatever online. Whatever the law is and if it becomes law, it has nothing to do with it. If you couldnt download anything at all, there would be no point in being on the net, or paying an ISP to get onto the net.

I hope whoever does deal in pirated software (if they use P2P programs, most do use some kind of P2P program) they get infected (most do) because they dont have a clue (what theyre doing, what theyre getting, or whether they're getting infected files or not). It doesnt matter if you've got a firewall , or AV program, it'll get disabled, and you wouldnt know. Until your PC comes to a crawl

limepile
06-08-2009, 09:16 PM
There were some good suggestions by the panel assembled for the show. I particularly liked the Apra guys one that we could all micro pay- that is, pay a license fee and have unlimited access to content.

The ISP's don't want a bar of any of it, as the guy put it, one industry has a problem and they are asking another industry to fix it. The bussiness model is broken, its time for creative thinking.

My son and his friends share music via hard-drive, usb and iPod..how will the govt stop that ?

A recent survey ( I'm vague on the numbers so excuse my educated guess from memory ) found that in the UK around 80% of under 28 year olds watch less than 3 hours tv a week, choosing the internet as the place they get their entertainment.
This seems like the future and a huge market that the advertising dollar is missing.
Web delivered tv is the future, free view in a different form. Revenue via content delivery is the only answer I can see.

I also think fibre optics is a waste of money, better to build a wireless network to cover the whole country.

somebody
06-08-2009, 09:22 PM
I also think fibre optics is a waste of money, better to build a wireless network to cover the whole country.

There are numerous countries that have tried municipal WiFi, with very limited (if any) success. They simply don't work - even with technologies like WiMax, there are still problems.

Fibre is a future-proof option, which won't see even a fraction of its full capacity utilised today - but in 20 years, who knows what we will be able to do. Your idea of a web-based Freeview is exactly where the industry should be heading - high definition, on-demand video or music served locally, either supported by ads or sold at a low cost (say, $2 a movie rental or whatever). The technology to support it needs the bandwidth, and currently the best (and most future-proof) option is fibre.

R2x1
06-08-2009, 11:56 PM
I - - - - flatly refuse to pay a fee just so some unknown brat can download tripe music(?) that will never see the light of day again.

Chilling_Silence
07-08-2009, 08:43 AM
+1 for somebodys thoughts :) totally agree!

EDIT: Fibre to the road-side sounds good, then pay a local tech / worker of your own to roll you fibre from the roadside to your house / PC

pctek
07-08-2009, 09:18 AM
There were some good suggestions ........... pay a license fee and have unlimited access to content.

My son and his friends share music


I read an SF story a while back.
It went along the lines of in the future when everyone gave up trying to stop it, the musicians gave up too.

They retired or got jobs and there was no new music produced. Because it was impossible to make a living doing it.

Digby
07-08-2009, 03:53 PM
Re the Close Up program last night, the guy from Telstra kept saying the music companies should make it easy for people to buy the music they want at a good price. Then the idiot from Appra kept saying he thought that the Internet was great and that we should pay for our music. But he did not say that they should get together and set up a NZ music online shop where every NZ song was available for a pay download.
Until they try it they can't knock it. I know many people who feel guilty d/ling NZ music and who would pay for a good quality copy.
Sure some people will copy them, but they are now so whats to lose ?

R2x1
07-08-2009, 03:58 PM
I read an SF story a while back.
It went along the lines of in the future when everyone gave up trying to stop it, the musicians gave up too.

They retired or got jobs and there was no new music produced. Because it was impossible to make a living doing it.
That ain't SF, it is history.
They stopped producing music quite a while ago.

Cacophony should be banned, not downloaded; free or otherwise. ;)

Twelvevolts
07-08-2009, 10:12 PM
I read an SF story a while back.
It went along the lines of in the future when everyone gave up trying to stop it, the musicians gave up too.

They retired or got jobs and there was no new music produced. Because it was impossible to make a living doing it.

If they're so useless they can't figure out how to make money at it - they should give it up. Close Up is getting worse by the week, I'm expecting an interview with a concerned diabetics cat owner any day now. Sainsbury proves Holmes had talent.

Metla
07-08-2009, 10:36 PM
I read an SF story a while back.
It went along the lines of in the future when everyone gave up trying to stop it, the musicians gave up too.

They retired or got jobs and there was no new music produced. Because it was impossible to make a living doing it.

The music will never stop just because some giant organisation of suits are upset their business model doesn't rake them in so much money they cant count it.

Hell, It would probably improve the music immeasurable, I'm all for the fail of the "recording industry".

Kindel
10-08-2009, 08:17 PM
That article annoyed me with incorrect information or misnomers at least once every 10 seconds. It was like nails grating on a chalkboard for someone who is actually computer-literate. "THEY'RE NOT SITES, THEY'RE APPLICATIONS, YOU STUPID WOMAN!", I cried inside my head at the reporter.

Also of course Tim Finn (or Neil, whichever one it was) and Bic Runga weren't bothered by it; it's not THEIR music that gets pirated. Also I agree with Metla, any musician worth their salt can do their own recording. The only exceptions would be manufactured American Idol-style pop. That actually requires the suits to work. Not that I'm particularly concerned; it can go and continue to die a slow painful internet-initiated death.

porkster
10-08-2009, 09:13 PM
I believe the popular model
CwF+RtB (Connect with Fans + Reason to Buy)
is the way music should be going. Read up on it at www.techdirt.com

CD music sales are declining and its not due to piracy. Those large shiny discs are just too big to carry around when you can carry 40 albums on a card no bigger than a postage stamp.

Movie theaters don't sell movies, they sell experiences (the reason to buy).
One of the largest pirated movies of all time was also the 4th largest grossing movie of all time.

Metla is spot on about the poor business models. And very little of the money makes it back to the musicians.

Gobe1
11-08-2009, 09:39 AM
We have enough music to keep us going for years, we dont need more
I listen to what i like, and most of it is 20 years old

Nyuuji
11-08-2009, 02:26 PM
Movie theatres don't sell movies, they sell experiences (the reason to buy).
One of the largest pirated movies of all time was also the 4th largest grossing movie of all time.

Porkster has hit the nail on the head as far as theatres are concerned.
I like going to the cinema for the large screens, great audio and overall experience of a night out.

BUT, I am slowly seeing the erosion of this enjoyment because of a lack of social consideration from patrons these days, i.e. loud talking, texting, mobile phone calls etc. And the cinema multiplexes will only have them self to blame. When is the last time you saw an usher inside the theatre asking someone to pipe down.

All of which lends me to stay at home and watch it on dvd or "other" means so I can actually enjoy the latest Hollywood dross.

Rant over.:D